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Elephind.com contains 3,586 items from Hawkesbury Advocate, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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POINTS IN GOOD MANNERS. IT IS CORRECT [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 3 November 1899

POINTS IN GOOD MANNERS i IT IS CORRECT | j For a bride to retain her family- name after her marriage; for example, *' Miss . Mary Smith " after her marriage to Mr. Jones may properly sign her name " Mary . Smith Jones." To omit a wedding torn* if the parties most concerned prefer to do so. When calling upon a guest to leave cards i for the hostess also,although the hostess be a stranger. j For a lady when making a call lo send her ° name up by the servant and leave ber card j upon the hall table. j To bow once only to the same person on a I public drive or at any public function j where people constantly pass each other. To remember that the first law of courtesy I consists in avoiding ali that will make one ; disagreeable or irritating to others, j To keep one's temper upon all occasions. I To call personally upon strangers before ; sending them an invitation to a social func tion. j To write *' the favour of an answer is re ' quested " at the lo Wer right hand of an iu i vitation ...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A LONG-DELAYED SHAVE. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 3 November 1899

A LONG-DELAYED SHAVE. < The celebrated French poet. Saint-Foix, who, io spite of his large income, was always in debt, sat one day in a barber's shop wait ing to be shaved. He was lathered, when the door opened and a tradesman entered who happened to be one of the poet's largest creditors. No sooner did this man see Saint-Foix than he angrily demanded his money. The poet composedly begged him not to make a scene. " Won't yon wait for the money until I am shaved ?" " Certainly," said the other, pleased at the prospect. Saint-Foix then made the barber a witness of the agreement, and immediately took a towel, wiped the lather from his face, and left the shop. He wore a beard to the end of his days. Boarder (warmly) rOh, I'm knowing to the tricks of your trade. Do you think I have lived in boarding houses twenty years for nothing ? Landlady (frigidly) : I shouldn't be at all surprised. * ... *; Dear," she said softly, " I have cruelly deceived you." - His brow darkened. He ha...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SOMETHING LIKE A MISER. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 3 November 1899

SOMETHING LIKE A ÍMSER Some rather good stories are told about a very wealthy old miser who lived in one of the English northern counties. Some years ago, evidently in a weak mo ment, he gave £10,000 or £12,000 towards the j support of a foreign mission, and since then numerous people have called upon him with the object of obtaining sabecriptk na On one occasion twv ladies eueceede" tn ; faining admittance-a by no jjueauc Maey task, ? for every visitor if. .doeely questioned through j M little aperture in the door befti--e ti* ' bolts Í are drawn-and weiv ushered a room] aod left alone foi abcuta quarter ox an br.tr. j At the md of that time the " gentleman r; ! of the ho-iso entered the room, and- glancing j at the table., ^aid:- j ** Wh¿ stole ray pin ?" jj One oí cbc 1 adi ce blushed, and saii shb J had iakej it CJ faster, lier bonnet-strings, j " Then tat- yjv go ! Any me wh. would ; steal my pin has no right in my hous^ " and j j h<-. ,onceremoai>.csly showed the...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ORIGINAL POETRY. OFF TO THE CAPE. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 3 November 1899

. ORIGINAL POETRY. OFF TO THE CAPE. If in tbe solitude of. night I dre iru of others far away. I wake to bless ilie morning light, And dream alone of thee by day. I dream at night of ttiose I love, Of mother, father, sisters, aye Of kind dear friends from whom I rove. But 'tis of thee I dream by day. Happy visions of the past Around my very head do play ; Beyond the dawn these do not last, . For 'tis of thee I dream by day. And past events do flit before Me,5through the moon's soft lambent ray, And pictures bright of days of yore, Yet 'tis of thee I dream by day. The past is then not all that's bright, The near and far off fature may Be more so, if these dreams are right ; For 'tis of thee A dream by day. When life's stern duties bid we work And chase the dreams of night away, Thine own sweet form doth round me lurk, Of thee alone I dream by day. And if, perchance in pain and woe, My time is up on'^earth to stay, I'lf gather up my heart to go ; But sure I'll dream of thee that day. ...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
IT IS INCORRECT [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 3 November 1899

IT IS INCORRECT j For those who have been invited to a wed i ding to ignore the newly married pair the season following. To depart upon a bridal tour in costumes that at once make the recent marriage obvious to all fellow passengers in trains and guests at hotels. * For a person to call upon a lady on any one of her reception days unless he has been specially invited to do so. ¡ To enter a drawing room with one's card in one's hand and to offer it to the hostess, j To talk or to laugh loud so that the attea Î tion of the public is attracted, j To use the expressioñ " table manners " or " tabie behaviour. " I To scold or give vent, in any way, to one's temper, either to one's equals or inferiors. I To send an invitation to afunction.enclos I ing a visiting card, to strangers. I To write " ILS.V-P.** upon an invitation. It is now considered better form to make a request for an answer in English. ITo use a seal if you cannot do so properly. To break eggs into a glass or cup is con side...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MR POTTS'S IDEAL IN PORK. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 3 November 1899

I MR pons's IDEAL IN PORK " I think, my dear, March pork is a good : purchase," said Mr. Potts, taking another , pancake ¿nd skimming over the paper. " I guess we don't need any, thank you," said Mrs. Potts. "If you see any good October butter anywhere, you might send up a jar." " Ton don't understand me, my dear, I mean a little speculation. Let me show you how it works. Now J buy 250 barrels of pork at 12dols. 37¿ cents, a barrel." *' Heaven and earth ! Mr. Potts, where are you going to put it all ?" " Don't be so fast, wife. I don't see the pork myself, or have anything to do with it." " I thought just now you said you were going to send up 250 barrels ? " No, I didn't. The pork I'm going to buy is way off in Chicago." " How do you know whether it is good or not, then ?" " Dear me, wife, what do I care whether it is good or bad ? I merely go long." " You mean you go long minding your own business ?" ^ " No, no. That's a technical phrase, bet me explain it to you. You see, when I ...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"DEADHEADS. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 3 November 1899

} DEADHEADS Very few readers are probably aware of the origin of the word "deadhead.'' which is so frequently used in connection with theatrical representations. It is stated to be as follows:-Many years ago, at the time of turnpikes, the principle avenue of a town passed close to the entrance of a road lead ing to the cemetery. As this cemetery had been laid out some time previous to the con struction of the road, it was arranged that all funeral processions should be allowed, to > pass along the latter free of toll. One day, as a well-known physician, who was driving along this road, stopped to pay the toll, he observed to the keeper, " Considering the benevolent character of our profession, I think you ought to let ns pass free of charge." " No, no, doctor," said the gate keeper, *: we can't afford that, you send too many deadheads through as il is." The story travelled around the country, and the word " deadhead" was eventually applied to those who obtained free admission to ...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TO MY SWEETHEART. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 3 November 1899

TO MY SWEETHEART. j ON HER SIXTIETH BIRTHDAY. This ie your birthday, dearest? Dearest wife, Fond sweetheart of my youth and of my prime. Lover and friend and comrade, in whose life I live unconscious of the flight of time ! Three score? and must we grant it so? Why, then Thank heaven we have tasted life thus long, For life is rich, and shall grow sweeter when Like mellowing wine, age renders it less strong. We (shall grow old together, count the years, Welcome each sunrise and each setting sun; Together laugh our laugh or weep our tears, Wait, act and suffer till the sands be run. I owned Golconda and the Coast of Pearl, Being a boy-it was but yesterday: One shared my fortune, giving hers-one girl Whither, my darling, fled youth's dream away? Where are the morning and the wealth of spring?"' Gone with the ai'-built castles! vanished, gone The dew ri y mt fi veu sun v<»ro, ami the wing Is Dix kee Bt>w ¡hst b:*n>c at golden dawn. What can I give hm giv* myself aotw? A...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Lord Kelvin. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 3 November 1899

j Iiord Kelvin. j In an illustrated account of Lord Kel vin's life and home in Glasgow in the " Pall Mall Magazine," Mr. Arthur War ren says : " Lord Kelvin is one of the most kindly-natured men I have ever known. His manner is very gentle and pleasant and winning, but for all that his utterance is decisive. As a teacher he is simply delightful. He is at the furthest remove from your grim pro fessors. It is always a great treat to hear Lim lecture, either before his Uni versity class, or before the Boyal So ciety, or any other learned body. He speaks in a. low conversational tone, which is clear enough withal, and plea santly Scottish in its accents, and a smile plays over his face as he delivers some difficult scientific truth. When he cracks a very hard philosophical nut he pauses for an instant, looks at his audience, gives a merry little laugh, as much as to say, 4 This is the simplest of pastimes, yet you appear to think, and the world thinks so too, that it is a difficult, eve...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Genius and Disease. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 3 November 1899

Oenius and Disease. Whether or not men and women of genius are more frequently than others the victims of physical disability, the fact remains that a very large per centage of the more illustrious ones have been so afflicted. It may be that the "Omaha Medical Journal" attaches to some of its Hst of diseased geniuses maladies that have not heretofore been generally known to have afflicted them. A list, summarised, is as follows : Whittier is said never to have enjoyed one half-hour's immunity from the suf ferings of his heart disease. Darwin's beautiful life of prodigious accomplish ment was an hourly battle with ill health. Robert Louis Stevenson's pathetic warfare in the same line has made a deep impression on many, even of those who have not come under the spell of his literary genius. Everyone knows of Cowper, the nielancholiac, possessed with the demon of self destruction ; of Charles Lamb, with his heredity acute mania, his alcoholism, and his confirmed melancholy ; of De Quin...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advice to New Riders. A Nuniber of "Dont's" for Beginners on the Bike. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 3 November 1899

Advice to New Riders. A Nuniber of '« Dents" ter BeginnerJ< on fbe Bike. Don't scorch. Don't get nervous. Don't run over a dog. Don't minc! a "header" or fall. Don't ride immediately after luncheon. : Don't try to ride without touching the ] handle bars. * j Don't monkey with your machine, screws, bolts, or tires. ? Don't get frightened when you see a . horse approaching. i Don't try to make a century run the ; tirst Week you ride. Don't place your handle bars too low or your saddle too high. Don't try to break world's records on the first day you ride. Don't worry about punctures. They come when least expected. Don't ride too near the kerbstone. Tour pedal will certainly collide. ^

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Egg-balls for Soap. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 3 November 1899

Egg-balls for Soap. There are some kinds of soup which are greatly improved by the addition of egg-balls, and for the benefit of those .j/ho are not quite sure how to get about them a simple recipe ls given. Rub the yolks of three or four hard-boiled eggs lc a smooth paste with a little oiled butter, and a dash of pepper and salt. Now add two uncooked eggs ; beat all together lightly, and sprinkle in just enough flour to form a paste. Flour your hands, make the mixture Into balls, and set in a cool place until a few minutes before your soup is served. Put them into the boiling soup long enough lo heat through.

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Statistics of Houses. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 3 November 1899

Statistics of Bouses. i _ i Some one has industriously made a compilation cf the number of houses in Europe and North America. This is placed at seventy millions <says the " Pall Mall Gazette"). Paris seems to be the most densely populated of the capitals, with 90,000 houses and an ave rage of twenty-five persons per house. New Tork is not far behind, for the number of houses is 115,000, and there are eighteen persons to a house. L>ondon, which is always supposed to be so crowd ed, has one house to every seven people, and contains 600,000 houses. But Tokio is even better off, for there five persons is the average. Perhaps these figures may partially explain why London is more healthy than most other large towns. The enormous number of houses, merely used for business purposes, in and out of the city is probably the cause of the sparseness of our population. It is said that the wild lettuce of the United States is " one of the two well marked compass plants," and that i...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Table. Four Ways of Cooking Potatoes. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 3 November 1899

I The Table. Four Ways of Cooking Potatoes. Potato Loaf.-Take some mashed po tato, season it with pepper, salt, and a dust of powdered mace, and in a baking dish which can be sent to table form a round-shaped mould. Scatter fine bread crumbs over, with a few bits of butter on them, and bake in a quick oven till a good brown. Croquettes.-Take butter the size of an egg, beat It to a cream, add to lt ?gradually two eggs, two teaspoonfuls of flour, haif-teaspoonful of salt, and six heaped tablespoonfuls of mashed potato. Form this mass, after mixing- well, into sausage-shaped croquettes, dip them into beaten egg, then into fine bread crumbs, and fry in plenty of hot lard till a golden colour. Stewed Potatoes. - Cut the potatoes into dice quarter of an inch thick, and drop into boiling milk thickened with flour and seasoned delicately wtth but ter, pepper, and salt. When the sauce just boils serve at once, with a dust of chopped parsley over. If you have any remains of cold boiled fish a...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Bismarck's Head. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 3 November 1899

Bismarck's Bead. The famous, and a fitly named, German sculptor, Schaper, who executed the statue of Bismarck at Cologne, was privileged to be on more familAr terms than anybody now living, probably, with his sitter's head. He had that head in his hands for days, and surveyed, and measured, and manipulated it to his heart's content. The results of his ob servations and mensurations he sub sequently placed at the disposal of Science, and Science has proceeded to institute comparisons between the Prince's head and others-not only in point of size, but in point of brain weight also-very greatly, as may be imagined, in the great man's favour. The Bismarck head measures 212 and 170 in millimetres. This, it appears, is colossal. In Baden, where heads run big, out of 2500 they measured, only one ran to 206 millimetres from forehead to occiput. The most extensive head they could find upon a savant gave a cubic capacity of 1800 centimetres only. Bis marck's goes this 165 cubic centimetres be...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Interesting Experiments in Photography. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 3 November 1899

Interesting; Experiments in Photography. According to the experience of an emin ent photographer and-naturalist, it is a somewhat difficult matter to get a photo of a tigress yawning. You have to at tend the royal lady, he says, when she is asleep, and have to wait hours and hours until she awakes and yawns. Then, when she opens her royal jaws, you may very likely get a snap-shot at her with the camera, but more likely she will get a snap-shot at you, in which event yours will be nowhere, nor you either ; while her yawn will be changed to a smile. This is not encouraging certainly for persons who want photos of yawning tigers, and it is not surprising that such persons as a rule prefer to let some erne else take the negative, while they make sketches of the finished production when published-as has happened to the artist in question. It seems to us, how ever, that this operator doesn't go the ri gilt way to work. If, now, he was to wait upon her feline" "majesty when she is awake, a...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Lemon Toast. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 3 November 1899

Lemon Toast. You must first beat up the yolks of six eggs, and add to them three cups of ri weet milk. Now cut a stale loaf into slices, dip these into the egg and milk, drain them for a minute, and fry them a nice golden brown in boiling lard or fresh dripping-those who can afford to do so may use fresh -butter, but that is rather extravagant. Now, while the fried bread is kept hot, whisk up the whites of the eggs, add a. cup of "white sugar and the juice of two lemons ; beat up carefully in a small saucepan, adding two cups of boiling water, and pour ali over the toast.

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
More Living Pictures. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 3 November 1899

Kor« Living Pictures. From America, the land of wonders, comes the report of a moat marvellous new invention, lt is a kind of muto Biope cimera, bat is designed especially for a certain kind of picture-making that has never been attempted hitherto. For example, the contrivance is set up in front of a stalk of corn just sprouting and takes a photograph of it every hoar for six mouths. Subsequently the film ts pat into a magic-lantern and ran off at the rate of thirty a second, thus giving to the spectators in five minutes a view on the screen of a corn plant grow ing oat-of the earl!:, putting forth leaves, exhibiting the ripened ears, and finally decaying. It is believed that this idea may be so employed as to have great educational value. There are almoßt infinite possi bilities, obviously, for the utilisation pf the method, and one may easily imagine it applied to ¿he study of the growth of any kind of plant. Place thiB new camera in an open apace ; attach it to an electric wire, ...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HUMOROUS COLUMN. HE STILL HAD A THIRST. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 3 November 1899

HUMOROUS COLUMN. HE STILL HAD A THIRST. 1 A poor woman iu a couutry village had a son, who was a notorious drunkard. She reasoned with him very often shoot his dissolute habits, and, at last, in despair, went to the village clergyman with her trouble. He sympathised with her, and readily undertook to try what he could do to affect acare, and, dismissing the woman, told her to let him know at once when her son was drunk again. In the meantime, the clergyman had a coffin made, and at the same time made arrangements for opening a vault in the village cemetery. It was not many days before he re ceived the news that he was waiting for. The man was again helplessly drunk, and while in this state he was shrouded, placed in the coffin, carried to the vault, and a man, also dressed in grave-clothes, set to watch beside the coffin to report on the drunkard 's awakening. After a deep sleep, the man awoke, tried to stretch his limbs, but failed, owing to the narrowness of bis prison. He next ya...

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MIND YOUR COMMAS. [Newspaper Article] — Hawkesbury Advocate — 3 November 1899

MIND YOUR COMMAS. Thia instance is ail old one-«it nsed to amuse os as schoolboys-of «hat the vant of a comma will do : Caesar entered on his head His helmet on his feet His sandals in his hand His trusty sword in his eye An angry glare. Mr. Carrington Dey, a schoolmaster, of Maidstone, says he once asked some children to write out some lines (which they had learned orally) from Scott Where's Harry Blount, Fitz Eustace, where Î Linger ye here, ye hearts of hare f The result was as follows : Where's Harry Blount which nsed ter swear Linger ye here ye hearts of air.

Publication Title: Hawkesbury Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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