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Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - ... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 382,303 items from Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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You're the Fellow [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

You're the Fellow     You're the fellow people pass     To share some other's brim-     ming glass; You're the fellow men forget When skies are bright and     sunny yet, But, when friends have need of   you,   You're the fellow who comes   through. You're the fellow doing more For men than those who rant   and roar, You're the fellow making earth     A place of brotherhood and     worth.   Many men are known to me—   You're the kind I'd like to be.    

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

Wolfe's Schnapps is a Necessity for Women at any Stage of Life FROM mother to daughter, down through three generations, has   been passed the knowledge of the benefits to health that follow the occasional use of Wolfe's Schnapps. For health reasons you should keep Wolfe's Schnapps in the home against the time when you will certainly need its aid. Wolfe's Schnapps is obtainable in Handy Quarter sizee, as well as Half and Large sizes. AROMATIC SCHIEDAM "As Good for Women as for Men."

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

LADIES' TAILORING To the Smart Tailored Woman our newly-opened Ladies Department offers Stylist cutting and individual treat- ment backed by a sound reputation. Every order cut and made on premises. Costumes made to measure from £6.6.0 LADIES'AND GENT'S TAILORS KING STREET, SYDNEY

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
GHOSTLY SOLDIER [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

GHOSTLY SOLDIER   M. JEAN BAPTISTE ORNAUX, 57, a roadman, of Maubeuge, France,   served in the army during the war, but when he applied for papers to show that he was an ex-serviceman he was told that records showed he died when he was a few days old.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
BATS CAN SEE [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

BATS CAN SEE BATS ARE not blind. They have poor eyesight, and see best at dusk. * * * THE TARDIGRADA, a water bear, can live for years without food. It shrinks to almost pinhead size, but wakes up when placed in water.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

FORRESTER'S FUR SALE Owing to the late Winter we are compelled to Reduce our Stock of Exquisite Furs— All of which have been made for the 1933 season. SPECIALLY PRICED FOR SEVEN DATS ONLY. Marmot Necklets, extra long Super Pelts Our Guarantee has made   Your Inspection the Leading Furriers. Stand Lay-Byes Accepted on Sale Prices. FORRESTER'S Furriers. Peschaniki Coats, exclu-   sive styles, fully guaran- |126 PITT STREET, teed, full length . . £11/11/ |Between King Street and Martin Place. WE CANNOT ACCEPT CASH ORDERS DURING THE SALE.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
DIET—But Don't Annoy Your HOSTESS! [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

DIET—But Don't Annoy Your HOSTESS! From Nell Murray, Our Special Repre- sentative in Europe. LONDON. WITH a "No thanks, m'dear. I'm diet- ing," many a guest at many a table has given many a hostess a pang of mortification or irritation or plain bad temper. Dieters are nuisances! But I know one woman who is both a determined dieter and a perfect guest, and this woman always eats whatever is put before her when away for a week- end for instance. But she follows this up with a real day of penance, as follows:— Tea and slimming rye bread only for breakfast. Fruit only for lunch. For dinner, salad only—a really fresh salad, with plenty of everything included ex- cept potatoes. Her own special non-fattening salad   dressing is also of interest: Mix to-   gether the yolk of a hard-boiled egg with dry mustard, salt, paprika, and a crushed saccharine tablet. Blend with vinegar and a little tomato catsup or walnut sauce, and add some chopped parsley or mint. From ano...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
LOUISE MACK'S DIARY [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

LOUISE MACK'S DIARY "Give me my moments, you may have your years." —Richard Middleton. GERTRUDE FINISHING On and on she wanders. The first night of "Evensong," still playing to packed houses, and the tremendous suc- cess of Edith Evans. The curtain went up and down for Edith Evans. Up and down, up and down, up and down, it seemed forever. Then they called for Beverley Nichols, who by then had dis- appeared from his box and was not to be seen. But the crowd demanded him. They wouldn't desist. They made scenes. At last the stage manager came out and said: "Ladies and gentlemen. I am very sorry, but to get Mr. Beverley Nichols here would mean a free fight in   the wings!"   Overcome by shyness, Beverley could not even be dragged on to the stage. As for the heroine being Melba, Bever- ley loudly and unceasingly and on every possible occasion declared that he never meant "Evensong" to be a portrait of Melba. It was not! It was not; It was   NOT! The...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
CAREER THAT GIRLS DREAM OF [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

CAREER THAT   GIRLS DREAM OF     MISS ELIZABETH HUNGER,     of New York, has realised the     dream of a million girls who     take a commercial course and     enter business. According to a     cable she has married her em-     ployer, and he is a millionaire—     Matthew Brush, America's rich-     est bachelor.     Just what a commercial career     offers to a woman will be dis-     cussed in a future issue of The     Australian Women's Weekly     under the "Careers for Women"     feature. Meanwhile, see Page 9.    

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
TURNING the PAGES of YESTERDAY Album [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

ITURNING the PAGES of YESTERDAY SOME evening when you have nothing better to do, dig out the old family album and turn over the pages. You will enjoy it, especially if you have a catty old aunt to sit by and give you the "low- down" on your relatives. This is what we did the other night, and here are a few pictures taken haphazard from the album, to- gether with aunty's comments:— 1. This is Aunt Emma and her husband. She is my father's sister, and always said, "I am not going to get married yet," but she did. 2. And this is old Mrs. Jones. Can you imagine her being as slim as in this picture? 3. I have torn it out at least three times already. This time I will burn it. That is Aunt Elie. 4. The boys are Uncle Will and Henry. Henry married an actress who later eloped to America with another man. He never had any luck, Uncle Henry. 5. This is my brother Paul. He is a shop-walker now. If you ever want to buy collars, he can get them for you at wholesale prices. 6. This is a picture of...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Red Bedrooms Are DANGEROUS [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

  Red Bedrooms Are DANGEROUS Dr. Donald Laird, of Colgate Uni-     versity, for many years has studied   the sleeping habits of all kinds of   people.   In his report, which he has just   completed, he states that people   should be taught how to sleep just   as babies are taught how to walk.   "Sleeping is not a simple accom-   plishment that anyone can do   well!" he says, and adds:   If your body is awake your mind will not sleep. Red in the bedroom may keep you awake. Older persons sleep longer, but not so well. There is no substitute for sleep, but the loss of two hours of sleep-     ing time can be slightly recom-   pensed by substituting a generous supply of carbohydrates, particu- larly sugars.  

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

HE FELL IN LOVE WITH HER SMILE HER VOICE WAS THE   SWEETEST   MUSIC TO HIS EARS.     HE WORSHIPPED THE GROUND SHE WALKED ON . . TILL . . .   DUTIFUL DAUGHTER. THAT SHE WAS . . HER HANDS BEGAN TO TELL THE WORLD THAT SHE HELPED MOTHER WITH THE HOUSEWORK BUT SOON . . . HAPPINESS AGAIN ! SHE STARTED   USING SOLVOL . . AND THEN . . . HOW HE SUFFERED TO SEE HEB. SWEET HANDS LINED AND STAINED. . . ..AND NOW HE'S DYING TO SLIP THE RING ON THAT     SOFT WHITE FINGER. !   "CINDERELLA HANDS" can regain their attractiveness. No matter how grimed and stained the housework makes your hands, a few moments with SOLVOL'S rich lather will     make them soft and white, and lady-like once more. Away come the deepest stains, the most obstinate grime in that safe, gentle, but thorooughly cleansing lather. Give your hands soft whiteness in spite of housework—— use ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

As all you girls know, wo-       man's fashions are mostly de-     signed hy men. I should     imagine thal they are all     single men. The average     married man's idea of the     perfect frock for a woman is     a large chaff-bag with holes     cut in it for the head and     arms. Wool-bales for the     winter.  

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
An Editorial JUNE 24, 1933. NATURE BALANCES HER BUDGET [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

An Editorial   JUNE 24, 1933. NATURE BALANCES HER BUDGET THESE are eco- nomical times we live in. Governments are cutting expendí- ture, factories are cut- ting costs, shopkeepers are cutting prices, and individuals are cutting out luxuries. Old Mother Nature her- self is doing her bit to balance the budget by cutting down the size of our families! We think of Nature as hostile or at best indifferent to man, but at times she seems to show an uncanny know- ledge of the needs of her human family. The high proportion of male children born after the War was her attempt to redress the disparity of the sexes caused by the disastrous weakening of our man-power.   Nature gives the gift of fecundity where it is most needed. The birth- rate in country districts, where labor is precious and food plentiful, is always higher than in the cities. The birth-rate in Australia has been falling steadily during the depression. In 1921 there were 15 babies born to every 1000 of...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
THE DREAM OF GOD LYRICS OF LIFE. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

THE DREAM OF GOD   LYRICS OF LIFE   I shall not see it nor will you,   Nor will our children—this new earth   That this old earth is coming to,   When worth will be the only worth; And yet the world at last will find   There only is one race—mankind.   I shall not see it, nor will you, Nor will our children—earth one sod; And yet that dream will yet come true, Because it was the dream of God. Turn back to Genesis and scan That dream again: "Then God made man."                

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

Dr. Scott's Compound Glycerine and Linseed The tried and proved remedy for Coughs, Colds, In- fluenza, Asthma, and affections of the Chest, Throat, and Lungs arising from colds and chills. KEEP A BOTTLE IN THE HOUSE! 1/-, 1/6 and 2/6 Obtainable everywhere.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

HIS BRIGHT IDEA A YOUNG man whom I know has both a glory box and a trousseau. He is engaged to be married, and as he gets some spare cash he buys silk shirts, singlets, pyjamas, and similar articles for his trousseau, or else household articles for his glory box. The latter consist of such tools and gadgets that are useful to a man about a house. Some might call him a crank, or even suggest that he is effeminate, but this is not the case. Personally, I think it is a good idea.—5/ to "Bunyip," Woollahra.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
SHE WILL Miss "Lovely Sydney" [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

SHE WILL Miss "Lovely Sydney "     Lady Street has been very busy say- ing "au revoir" to her many friends during the week. First, there was the reception at the Queen's Club, which struck a new note in the decorative use of pomegranates. These came from the North Shore garden of Mrs. H. S. Dett-   mann, the wife of the popular head- master of Sydney Grammar School. Lady Street was one time president of the Forum Club, and was entertained at luncheon by its members. "It will be difficult to find a more beautiful city than Sydney, and I will miss it all, especially the meetings in which I have taken an interest," said Lady Street. Holding her bouquet of red roses and violets, and sitting beside the president, Lady Storey, Lady Street chattered to the members, assuring them she would tell the Forum Club, London, about its Sydney sister. Lady Street, with her husband, the Chief Justice, Sir Philip Street, will leave at an early date for an extende...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Thrills! Glamor! Tense Love Drama! [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

Thrills! Glamor! Tense Love Drama! A sensitive woman, a product   of London art circles, finds her- self on a farm in New Zealand. There is a battle of wits—of love—between the woman and the stalwart young farmer. The scene shifts then to Paris. . . . Glamorous, thrilling, amazing. That is the fascinating novel specially written for The Aus-   tralian Women's Weekly by the brilliant Australian writer, Louise Mack. Miss Mack has just completed two novels. One will be pub-   lished in book form in August.   The other, "Eve's Daughter," will be printed in serial form in this paper, commencing the issue after next.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
I'LL WRITE TO-NIGHT [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

I'LL WRITE TO-NIGHT     I'll write to-night—no, write   to-morrow; But there is many another's   sorrow   That cannot wait another   day.   Yet time's a debt we sel- dom pay,     A thing to spend and not to       borrow.     I'll send a friend a word of   greeting,     But not to-night, we keep re-     peating; And so the words are     never said That might have lifted     someone's head,     Some heart another morn-       ing meeting.      

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
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