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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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FAMOUS ACTRESSES. THEIR MODE OF LIVING. THE SECRET OF ETERNAL YOUTH. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

FAMOUS ACTRESSES. THEIR MODE OF LIVING. THE SECRET OF ETERNAL YOUTH. The best known actresses and singers of Paris   have just been asked to reveal to the world the   secret of eternal youth, and explain how each   of them manages, while expending an amount of   activity which two average women, not of the   profession, could hardly furnish between them in   other walks of life, to keep as fresh and as ener-   getic as though her existence were a perpetual   holiday.     As a matter of fact, all play and no work would   be the very last combination to suit, among other   actresses, Madame Sarah Bernhardt, who says   that "the secret of her endurance is that she   never rests." "Fatigue," she adds, "is my stimu-   lant. Instead of pulling me down, it spurs me   on." She goes to b...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE FIRST YACHT RACE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

THE FIRST YACHT RACE. What is said to be the earliest of recorded yacht races took place on October 1, 1661. John Evelyn, in his diary of that date, mentions that he sailed with his Majesty (Charles II.) in one of his pleasure boats or yachts, "vessels not known amongst us until the Dutch East India Company presented that curious piece to the King, being very excellent sailing vessels." "It was on a match between this and his other new boat," con- tinues Evelyn, "built frigate-like, and one of the Duke of York's, the wager of £100, and the race from Greenwich to Gravesend and back, the King lost it going down, the wind being con- trary, but saved stakes in returning." The word yacht is itself Dutch, but the vessels which the Merry Monarch sailed were little similar to the racers of the present day. Mention is made of other yachts and races, but the details are very meagre.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A BRASS BAND. COMPOSED WHOLLY OF WOMEN. A CHICAGO INSTITUTION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

A BRASS BAND. COMPOSED WHOLLY OF WOMEN. A CHICAGO INSTITUTION. Chicago has a brass band composed of 20 women. There is not a man in the organisation. There are in the United States only two other brass bands composed wholly of women—one in Boston, and the other in San Jose, Cal. The organisation is the result of several months' work, and is expected to make a na- tional reputation for itself when it has been trained thoroughly. During the winter months the women are meeting for rehearsal weekly. With this training it is believed the players will soon be in a condition to compete with the veteran members of the older bands of the country. Chicagoans are told not to be astonished when they see a trim military lot of petticoated musicians armed with brass tubas and shrill cornets and rattling drums marching along the bumpy, muddy streets in parades next year, 1902. When the sight of a brightly-uniformed band becomes familiar to citizens of Chicago, the band will start on a tour of the ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CANDOR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

CANDOR. Miss Featherhead: I hope you are feeling better to-day, Mr. Boreham?   Mr. B.: No, I'm very dull and low-spirited.   Miss P.: Ah, but you seem more yourself.   —"Punch."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FIFTEENTH CENTURY WAR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

FIFTEENTH CENTURY WAR. When Lisbon was besieged by the Spanish in the 15th Century such Portuguese as were cap- tured were maimed; their eyes were put out, their noses, lips or ears were cut off, their finger nails or fingers amputated, and in this miserable plight they were sent back into the city with the announcement that when it was taken all the defenders would be similarly treated.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WEDDING RING OR BULLET. A SWEETHEART'S OPTION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

WEDDING RING OR BULLET. A SWEETHEART'S OPTION. A remarkable letter was read at the South Western Court a few weeks ago. Decimus Smith   (29), grocer's assistant, living at 16 Colliston-road,   Wandsworth, London, was charged with threaten-   ing to murder Evelyn Ethel Esther Palmer, a   young woman residing with her father at 18   South-side, Clapham-common.   The complainant said she had known prisoner for four years, and during a part of that time   they had kept company. He broke off the engage-   ment a year ago, and shortly after asked her to   renew the acquaintance. She refused, and he   said if she did not make up the quarrel he would   shoot her. She met him again, and consented to   walk with him. He asked her to marry him, but   she said she could not. Thereupon he produced   a revolver, and t...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BALLOON VERSUS FLYING MACHINE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

  BALLOON VERSUS FLYING MACHINE. The subject of aerial navigation has received   much attention of late, and many attempts have   been made to battle against adverse winds in   the navigation of the atmosphere. The "Century   Magazine" publishes an article by Professor King, who has made hundreds of voyages. He says that in spite of a century of rivalry on the part of flying machines, the gas balloon is still the only important means of aerial flight. Some time in the not distant future its prerogative will be re- cognised. The problems of the navigation of an ocean and of transportation across a continent have yielded to man's inventive talent; why not, also, those relating to the navigation of the atmo- sphere? There is no corner of the earth that will not eventually be reached by aerial routes. The gas balloon has now been used and improved for a century; aeronauts of great experience and ambition are at hand. Must ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The World's News. A RECORD OF NOTABLE EVENTS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

The World's News.   A RECORD OF NOTABLE EVENTS. Issued from the office of "The Daily Tele-   graph," Sydney, every Saturday morning,   and sold by all newsagents throughout the   Commonwealth at One Penny per copy.   Communications intended for publica-   tion should be addressed to the Editor.   Business communications should be ad-   dressed to the Manager of "The World's   News," 147 King-street, Sydney.   <

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NOTABLE PLACES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

  NOTABLE PLACES.   Brief descriptions, properly authenti- cated, of notable places throughout Aus- tralasia, with accompanying rough sketches or photographs, will be accepted by the Editor of "The World's News," and paid for at current rates.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE WEEK. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

THE WEEK.   The year just ended began in cloud cast   by the termination of the long reign of Queen   Victoria. It ends in humdrum and com-   monplace, though   during its course it was darkened by the assassina- tion of President M'Kinley. Al- though we have all through been waging a great war, the year has left upon the me- mory the impres- sion of being un- eventful. It has disclosed no new great personality, and has not much changed our esti- mate of those with which we were familiar. It has been marked by no great dis- covery in science, the chief progress of this   kind that has been made being in applying   science to industry, as, for example, by the   methods of electric communication worked   out by Signor Marconi. Perhaps with these   should be bracketed the advance in aerial navigation effected by M. Santos-Dumont. We have had no great book, t...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SIGNS OF THE TIMES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

SIGNS OF THE TIMES. O, come, let us chortle of Cricket! Let's sing of the swift-driven sphere! Let's follow the way of the wicket! For are not the Englishmen here? The Senate's of interest barren, The "House" has nobody to heed; The man of the moment's MacLaren, And Darling's a darling indeed. "Who thinks of "The Bill" and its clauses? Who cares what's exempted or "barred? It's cricket, aye, cricket, that causes Existence just now to be hard! Thermometers climb to the tropic, And no one remarks that it's hot. In the face of the prevalent topic That fact is completely forgot. What Reid is remarking at present We haven't the time to peruse; While Barton's enjoying a pleasant Immunity now from abuse. The veriest growler will grumble No more at his personal luck; As he hears of the failure of Trumble, When Trumper gets bowled for "a duck." The bounds of the schoolboy's ambition— The budding Australian's dream, Is but to obtain a position In our representative team. A frequent reminder o...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PERSIAN CARPETS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

PERSIAN CARPETS.   Genuine Persian carpets are mostly made by boys, the foreman of a batch of a dozen young- sters so employed being often under fourteen years of age. He calls out from memory the different colors and number of stitches to be used.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ROASTED TO DEATH. A GRUESOME BENDIGO STORY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

ROASTED TO DEATH. A GRUESOME BENDIGO STORY. A man named Michael Kinsella was burnt to death in his hut, near the Botanical Gardens, Bendigo (Vic.), on Christmas Eve. The circum- stances surrounding the case are somewhat pecu- liar. Deceased was a laborer, 48 years of age, and a native of South Australia. He and a wo- man named Nellie Magee had been living together for about five years. On Monday they came into Bendigo to make their purchases, and the woman remained in the city with some friends. She returned home about midnight, and on entering the hut a shocking spectacle met her gaze. Lying on the floor of the hut was the charred and almost unrecognisable body of Kin- sella. She aroused a neighbor named Monti, who accompanied her to the police station, where the occurrence was reported to Constable Green- shields. Dr. Hinchcliff, who made a post-mortem exami-   nation of the body, stated that the whole of it, with the exception of the ankles and top of the head, was b...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FASHIONABLE DRESS IN PARIS. A Paris correspondent of a London society paper says:— [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

FASHIONABLE DRESS IN PARIS. A Paris correspondent of a London society paper says:—   "If there are now few or none of the all- conquering 'belles' and 'toasts' of olden days, it is equally certain that the plain woman has be- come an extinct species in Society. The health craze makes for beauty, as it enjoins exercise,   early hours, fresh air, and temperance in eating and drinking. The plain woman, dowdily dressed, has been left behind with the dead and gone nineteenth century. We are all moderately beau- tiful in 1901. 'It is not the cowl that makes the monk,' says the old proverb, but we have to acknowledge that dress plays a very important part in a woman's life. It is not pleasant to insist upon, but there is no doubt that a well- dressed woman, be she even plain, has a great advantage over the prettiest of her sex with in- differently-made clothes. "For the moment simplicity reigns. Skirts are severely plain, and many bodices claim for their only deco...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
KILLED A MAN TO GET BACK TO PRISON. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

KILLED A MAN TO GET BACK TO PRISON. At Bari, in Italy, an old man named Gissi Vi- nenzo has just been sentenced to five years' im- prisonment for manslaughter. Gissi had only been released from prison a few days when he committed the crime. He declared in court that his object in killing the man was to get back to prison. On hearing his sentence accused said: "It is too little. Fire years pass quickly. Sen- tence me for life, otherwise I shall have to kill another man when I leave prison in order to be taken back." Gissi has spent 30 of bis 78 years in gaol.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOW TOMMIES "JOLLY" ONE ANOTHER. NICK-NAMES THAT STICK TO REGIMENTS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

HOW TOMMIES "JOLLY" ONE ANOTHER. NICK-NAMES THAT STICK TO REGIMENTS. The Life Guard is not oblivious to the fact that     he is the "Gentleman of the Guard," but to his     fellow-soldiers he is simply "a feather-bed sol-     dier in tin waistcoat." The Household Cavalry     do not recognise the existence of the cavalry of     the line, whilst the latter in their turn disdain to     notice the artillery and foot soldiers, terming   infantrymen "gravel-crushers." The dragoon     looks down upon the hussar, to whom he is known     as "ornamental rather than useful."     "Second to None" is the proud title of the 2nd     Dragoons (Scots Greys), whilst the 17th Lancers have long been universally known as "Death or Glor...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WAX ON THE SKIN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

WAX ON THE SKIN. Few or none of us are aware that our skins are coated with wax, apparently the same as bees' wax, which is also secreted by the skin of the bee, and melts at the same temperature as human wax—namely, 35deg. Centigrade. Cold cream, glycerine, lanoline, and other unguents are merely an artificial substitute for what the skin itself produces to guard itself, and keep out water and other liquids. Cold, it seems, has the effect of stopping the formation of this wax, and of freezing it, thus giving rise to "chapped" skin.     To be perfectly proportioned, a man should weigh 28lb. for every foot of his height.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHY SHE HELD ON. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

WHY SHE HELD ON. Ex-Congressman Cable, of Illinois, has a charming young daughter who is receiving her education in France. When she was several years younger than she is now her father took her on his knee one day and said to her:— "To-day a man asked me if I would not sell little brother. He said he would give me a whole room full of gold. Shall I let him have little brother?" The child shook her head. "But," persisted her father, "think how much money this room full of gold would be. Think how many things you could buy with it. Don't you think I'd better let the man have little brother?" "No," said the daughter; "let's keep him till he's older. He'll be worth more then."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LIVING ON HER SKIN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

LIVING ON HER SKIN.   A young San Francisco woman makes a living by selling her skin for grafting purposes. A year ago she first contributed a little skin to a friend who was in need of a whole hide, and, finding that she could stand the pain, and that her skin was particularly healthy, she concluded to profit by it. She sent a letter to nearly every physician and surgeon in San Francisco and Oakland, calling their attention to the fact that she had healthy skin for sale. Since then the young lady has had all the orders that she could fill at her very reasonable rates. She charges four shillings a square inch, and usually parts with twenty to thirty square inches at a time. Altogether, she has had nearly seven square feet of her skin removed from her body, and has now got round to the second growth.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WORTH KNOWING. TO CLEAN A SPONGE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

WORTH KNOWING. TO CLEAN A SPONGE. Wash in a strong solution of permanganate of potash, rub and squeeze well. It will be much discolored. Then take a lemon, cut it in half, and squeeze the juice on the sponge, and rub it well with the cut half, when the stains will be removed, and the sponge will appear in all its pristine freshness. If a large sponge, two lemons will be required. Then well wash in fresh water. FOR A COLD. For a cold in the head take a penny square of camphor, stick it on the point of a hat pin, hold the camphor in the flame of a candle for a minute, blow out the flame of the camphor, and inhale the fumes. If this be repeated several times when the cold is first felt it will entirely remove it. "—!" There is a word, a little word, Itself a perfect epigram. Whose accents day by day are heard In palace, hovel, train, and tram: 'Tis heard when on your corn, alack! Some giddy nursemaid drives her "pram," When braces break, when on the tack An unsuspecting foot you jam: I...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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