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Title: Mortlake Dispatch Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 19,644 items from Mortlake Dispatch, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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THE LARGEST ICE CAVE. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 14 February 1914

THE LARGEST ICE CAVE. A few years ago some members c'' the Austrian Speleological Society dis covered in the Dachstein mountains some oaverns which aro amongst the largest in Europe. Ono of these grot toes, the longitudinal axis of which is fully. 6500ft. long, moreover, turned lout to offer additional interest by its truly enormous ico masses, and was found to be the largest known iee cavo in the world. Though a scorching sun may bo burning outside on the bare, mountain rock, there is always an icy wind blowing through this underworld, freezing everything within its reach. Only sometimes, when (he outside tem perature ranges between 32 and 41 deg. Cut., and a comparatively warm rain penetrates through the fissures of the rook, entering right into the cavern, will there bo a temporary cairn and dis tinct melting of tho ice. Tho Dach stein ico cavo comprises several domes filled with ico, which communicate with one another through a number of fro zen galleries. An ice orovice S9 ft. ...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
RAISING CROPS WITH GUNPOWDER. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 14 February 1914

RAISING CROPS WITH GUN POWDER. Tho old brown gunpowder, formerly standard in the United States navy, but disused since tho introduction of smokeless powder, lias been found by the Navy Department to possess value a a fertiliser, we arc told by the In ventive Age. Says this paper : "Brown powder contains about SO per cent, of potassium nitrato, both of which arc constituents of fertiliser?. The au thorities at Indian Head, the navy proving station, wroto to tho Agricul tural Department and asked tho cx pei'ts if they did not want to experi ment with the gunpowder as fertiliser. The offer was refused. Then tho navy officials determined to use it themselves on the truck patoh in connection with the proving ground. The result is re ported to bu most promising. The garden truck succeeded beyond all pre vious records. Tho plan is to bo tried on a larger soale."

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CREAM IN HOT WEATHER. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 14 February 1914

I CREAM HjOT WEATHER.,' . Hoards.' tDfairynian sayjs:-In order to m;ike good butter in the summer it is accessary to take tlio very best of oaro of cream while it is being saved for a churning. No gleet to do this is 'per-' haps 0110 of tlie chief causes of poor butter in the summer. ]3utter from properly kept and ripened or earn will have a more desirable flavor, it will keep sweet longer, and bring a, high er jjrieo ju tiny market. Naturally, the first essential is to take* proper care of the milk in tilio stable and separating room. It must be kept away from' undesirable odours, if taints ard not wanted in the but ter. It is preferable to skim a rather heavy cream in hot- weather, one test ing about 35 per cent. It ought to be skimmed beforo tho milk has cooled or set around for any length of time. .One of "tho first essentials is to cool it. as |soonv (niter separation as pos sible. When it caiii be arranged, a desirable method is to have the cream can set in a tank of ice water...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BRITISH FOOD IMPORTS. DECLINING SUPPLIES EVER-GROWING-MARKETS [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 14 February 1914

BRITISH FOOD IMPORTS. DECLINING SUPPLIES EVER-GROWING- MARKETS Ihe report of tho Board of Agricul- I turo on the farm products imported Jnto Great Britain gives an impressive idea of tho value of that country as a market for our supplies of meat, but ter , cheese, wool, trait, grain, or lor anything useiul which our settlers cay raiso iroin the generous soil of this Do minion. The average annual value of agri cultural commodities of all kinds im ported into Great Britain during the last livo years is given as £268,311,000, and the increase over the same period twenty years ago is no less than £93,351,000. Tho report dealing with meat shows that Great Britain noiv imports 110 less than 21,1203,000 cwt. of meat during tho year, and consumes 32,052,000 owt. raised by British farmers, making a total of 53,255,000 cwt. equal to 131 ib per head of population. During the last twelve years there has beeu an increase in consumption of 1,250,000 owt., of which 800,000 cwt. was in homo supplie...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DEAL IN DALMATIANS. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 14 February 1914

DEAL IN DALMATIANS. A gentlemen went into a shop in I Birmingham and told the proprietor that ho wanted to buy a Dalmatian dog Ui take abroad with him. "Certainly, sir," said the assistant. "I've got the very tiling." j In a quarter of an hour he brought out tho animal; the customer paicl the money and departed. Before his train time, however, a heavy shower fell. Tho gentlemen returned with the dog in a state of indignation. "Look at him!" ho cried. "You told me he was a Dalmatian. Givo roe my money back. All his spots are washed off in.the rain." The proprietor apologised. "It's all that stupid fool's mistake." He called to his assistant. "James, did you sell this dogj to this gentleman?" "Yes, sir." j "Well, von ought to bo ashamed o ] yourself. Don't you know an 11111 ! brella goes with this dog?"

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WOMEN'S INTERESTS [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 14 February 1914

WOMEN'S INTERESTS (By "Ambrosine.") Tho skirt is going to hall-mark tlie dress-is, in faob, doing til's now. I can only offer 0110 opinion: that tho spring-spread, hip is going to bo con demned by all except extremists. Hav ing said that I glance at tho blouso-I refer 10 tho dominating noto. In this department wo havo everything tbat is beautiful, and very littlo that calls for condemnation. The frill has grown like a flowor--bud to bloom. Bit by bit tho Medici has expanded till we aro one remove from an irregularly formed ruff. Tho .swelled front, which is outlined with a frill is to he.exploited, frill to short sleeve in keeping, or to longer in the form of an hour-glass. Tho designers the other side of the world aro nothing if not resource! ul to names. Tho wrist-frill, which is drawn in at centra witjli ribbon, is very aptly described. Buttons are an otcetra wo shall seo in loss striking form. IVhilo plenty may bo used, either i r use or decoration, they will bo of much reduced ...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SCHNAPPS FALSELY LABELLED. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 14 February 1914

SCHNAPPS FALSELY LABELLED. Before a bencli of local magistrates on 29th January at St. Ivilda, Kate J ury (Bay View Hotel, High-street1), ft as oharged with exposing for sale schnapps under a false trade descrip tion. Inspector Roche gave evidence that ho found schnapps exposed for sale en accused's premises iu a bottle labeled Wolfe's Schnapps made by another firm than tho actual maker. Tiie defence was that when defendant poured the schnapps into Uic wrjig bottle she defaced tho label therf-o/:, ami her son relabelled tho schnapps "Draught." Accused's plea was accepted, and the case was dismissed. No costs were al lowed . In tho District Court on 30th Janu ary, before Mr. V. Tanner, P.M., Mary Murtagh, licensee of ;Saracen's HeaiL Hotel, Bourke-stveet, was charg ed, on the information of i.-Matthew Campbell Leckie, inspector of liquor, with having on 22nd November last applied to certain schnapps « fnJso trade description, namely, - " Wolfe's Schnapps." Informant stated that he we...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MAN-EATING FOXES. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 14 February 1914

MAN-EATING FOXES. That tlio fox may bo a man-eater appears from experience in Uppir Piedmont, Italy. A young woman, ac customed to wander in the mountain gorges, disappeared, and after a time som© articles of clothing belonging to her, surrovwided with footprints of foxe.1. j were discovered at a point nearly a mile above son-level. As there were iiO other tracks, it was concluded that, while stajy'fkd by cold or fntigue, the woman must have been attacked and eaten by tlieso animals.

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Terribly Tempted. CHAPTER II. PHILIP ASHTON. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 14 February 1914

A SEIliAL STORY . BY AM MABEL GRAY. n^smm CHAPTER, II. PHILIP ASM TO Of all tlie many miseries that afflict mankind, surely one of the greatest is the possession of brilliant powers with scanty, perhaps no means to cultivate them. Sueh people crave after tho unattainable, their struggle is hard, they are dissatisfied! with their lot, and feel unhappy. Philip Ashton was a Bian of this description; he was by Je a carpenter, a man of toil, a man The people, 0110 of many thousands tague possibilities of hidden power, Vlio reeogniso the futility of rebel ho could only realise in a dull fa.id that knowledge and freedom must .him by, and submission lie gained ksical toil. Labor is indeed an kit opiat.'. Chance and society pied liii i that knowledge . for 'he hungered with a sort of jLspair, and yet, how ignorant, we y-the supposed wisesi of us! Life at times like a game of blind MjufT, and a number of more or Lcited children dashing aimlessly ^\ie or other of tlieni making ? es and snatche...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOMELY HINTS. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 14 February 1914

HOMELY HINTS. The tangled threads of yesterday Will still unsnarl with toil and pain, To-day, our stubborn fingers play Sad havoc with to-morrow's skein. And yet the pattern grows apace, Despite tlio tangles that distress; And, at the last, it gains a grace, I? rom all our patient clumsinesss. Suet will keep in good condition if well covered with flour. Use a bicycle pump to remove dust from tufted furniture. A slight draft on br.'ad that is rising may cause it to come up very slowly and perhaps spoil it altogether. When roasting a turkey, stuff the breai'v with pared sweet pitoties; they get a, fine flavor from the juice. Try .scraping off that burned sido of your eak<> with a very coarse grater. Much superior to the knife. Before frying liver, try dipping the slices in hot water; the flavor is im proved and much more delicate. When washing flannels, bo sure that the soap is thoroughly dissolved, or it will stick, and the flannels be patchv when dry. When y0ll carry a...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MELBOURNE LETTER [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 14 February 1914

MELBOURNE LETTER (From our Speoial Correspondent). The Indeterminate Sentences Act, which was brought into action some five years or so ago, and from whioh ituujh was expected, lias not fulfilled <;>qice".L!>.um-a. j Tlio idea ^back of it certain] v'^kad wide possibilities, but jijeo nwfiz e/lorts to handle tho criminal eicmcnt oii'-. efcively, it was not design ed on a sufficiently comprehensive [ .'an and there seems to have been lack of .Jctenuinatioii in carrying out even ..vimt was proposed. The intention behind this now law was to secure 'lie adoption of a modern, scientific, and jiiimsno system for the treatmnt of criminals, which would distinguish sharply between incorrigibles, who are menaco to society, and youthful of fcmler.s, who needed only to be set tho right tvnek, to become use ful and law abiding members of the community. i''or ibis purpose, it was proposed that special reformatory pris ons should be established, where of fenders con Id be detained ...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
REMEDY FOR GLARING LIGHT. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 14 February 1914

REMEDY FOR GLARING LIGHT. A novel device has recently been perfected for overcoming fclie danger from glare .in motor-car headlights. This device consists of a rack of alum inium plates, placed behind the main glass and in front of tho lens and turner. These plates are placed hori zontally, ono above the other, about one-eigth of an inch apart, and have their lower surfaces' highly polished, and the upper surfaces painted a dead black. The effect is that from a dis ! tance of about 150 yards, the full light is seen without any apparent shading, i hut as tho ear approaches, tho light and glare becomo weaker and weaker, until, I when a few yards away, nothing can J bo seen but a faint grey glow. »

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
POULTRY NOTES. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 14 February 1914

POULTRY NOTES. It is surprising more poultry-keepers do not keep a well-filled dust bath, which is the best of all cures against insect troubles. It is little trouble or expense. Dry earth or road dust, to a depth of 9in. to 12in., in a deep box, kept in a dry, sheltered position, is nirthat is required. A little pow dered sulphur should be added occas sionally, whilst carbolic powder is very useful in bad cases. Some'hens are so infested with insect life0 through neglect of the dust bath, that it is sometimes necessary to dip them bodily in a batli made of a decootion of quassa chips «nd tobacco water, afterwards placing; in a warm coop to dry. Such insect troubles are generally confined to fowls which cannot'liave their liberty and are kept in too close quarters, as poultry running on fields will find tlieir dust bath under hedges and other places. Prevention is better than cure, and whether young or old, fowls kept in confinement must have a dust bath, or parasites wilt rapidly b...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 14 February 1914

Correct Wolfe's Schnapps lia.ri'isoii, me! :WKS MERCHANTS, AND SUPPLY I10TJSE FOR Brewers, Aerated Water Manufacturers, Hotel Keepers, Bakers,. and Refreshment Rooms. Correspondence invited on All Articles- used in the above trades. . Koto Address 304 Flinders STREET, ? MELBOURNE. m STUDYING YOUR DRESS, STUDY YOUll POCKET TOO ! ! 1 Don't Pay Higher I'riccs for Suits no Bettor than. Mine,! I deal strictly for Cash, con sequently 1 linvo no bad debts for which you have to pay. 2 import all my materials direct from the manufacturer, and make all Suits on my own promises. I can give you a largo <) assortment. of \Jj- siiados to choose T"'c. from in |fan<:y designs And /('if !>"?Vw\ the very I,'test it! WM 5 ? I* I 11 d i g o D y <? ? # tweeds, worst A i! cds, Vicunas, '10 hJtf V^.V^viHs, and the 5v fi; i i; 11! ?- w;fam<n,s Gcelong Jfe ill I i i SAC stjit o tlfmiiiL / MEASXIll1? pillar ;:A ?«,sorfc *iii ii 5 "£'. y iimonfij .of Ovor tfl I|-...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ENGLISH FARM PRODUCTS. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 14 February 1914

ENGLISH FARM PRODUCTS. Part II of tho Agricultural Statistics for 1912, issued by the British Board of Agriculture, floals with the produce of crops, and brings out the deficient yields csi' wheat, oats, and potatoes, ow ing to the wet Reason. A table is given, showing ilia hypothetical value of crops. Wheat is put at £l0.88i5-000 :u: compared with £12,210,000 in l'Ul; barley, CS.-to2.000, against £8.614,000 oats, £9,108,000. against £9 .<>77,000; potatoes, £8.908,000, against CIO.118.000. On tho other hand, clover, etc.. bav is given at £10,2.57.000, , against £0.800.000; and meadow hay, £29.710,(100, against .021,173.000. Hops ore estimated at £'2,259.000. against £3.12S.OOO. tho drop in this -;aso being duo to tho de creased price. Hi is noted as re msrkablo that tho market prices were ,.o nearly similar, in three instances identical, in tho two seasons, and ex cept for wheat, potatoes and hops, tho nominal value of the crops of 1912 is said to compare favorably wit...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TURNIPS AND NITROGEN. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 14 February 1914

TURNIPS AND NITROGEN. Mr Thomas Jamiosou, Director oi' the Agricultural lteocarch Association ot .Scotland, hay made u carol ui con sideration of tile turnip, winch ex perience and. experiment show does not, require artificial nitrogen, but is spec ialiy supplied with means lor tiding tlio necessary qualities oi this element, iroin the open air. The rape plant has a structure practically identiiical with the turnip. The special examin ...un of the turnip and rape was brought about irotii the fact, that a better crop of oats was secured after ploughing rape than resulted l'rom oats after clover. In this connection, Air Jaimeson declares, "iSrot to carry the turnip leaves olf the held cannot be too strongly repeated. The benelit to the succeeding crop is well-known, though it was not realised that the absorption ofi nitrogen was by the teuves, and that provision of this ele ment to tho succeeding crop is the ex planation. The turnip shows in a dried plant per 100 parts 2.25 of nitroge...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ACTION OF GRASS ON TREES. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 14 February 1914

ACTION OF GRASS ON TREES. In tho latest number of Science pro gress is an article by Mr Spencer le ering, F.R.S., director of tho "Wobtirn Experimental -Fruit Farm. En}t'«:i:! givinjs tho results of & series of ex haustive experiments todeti rmiii<? .!: . effects produced by growing grass above the roots of fruit trees. In', this country, tho deleterious effect of grass on trees is generally recognised, and commercial orchards are, as a rule, carefully cultivated, but in England, tlioro is considerable differenco of opin ion awl practice, grassed orchards be ing not uncommon, although intensive fruit growing, with clean cultivali- n. : tho latest plia.se of the industry. 7lie chief reason for this divergence of opin ion Mr Pickering believes to lio in the fact that effect produced by grass vanes greatly according to tlio nature of tho soil, and. in some few cases, may lie negligible; tho grassing of the laud is also generally carried out gradually which materially...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE NEW FARMER. SCIENTIFIC ADVANCE [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 14 February 1914

THE NEW FARMER. SCIENTIFIC ADVANCE If thu .'transition oi' '-agriculture 'which is thought to bo in progress a to reach the more intensive suite de sired by reformers, it can onl> be m dueed bv tho tarn tor. Landlords nwi> lead ami persuade, but t.io ^ belief in the form oi cultivation uhlth pavs him best is the deciding ac-oi. \Yo have signs 111 plenty thai, the farmer is advancing along the lints oi scientific theory (says a. currc.-ii)un dent oi i he '.Loudon 'limes, J. On paper and in the abstract, tho lac farming tho greater the proius toi all concerned. Iho idoiiL to ami aiJ_ is that Danish farm, muen visited English banners and landowners, which yields an average prout of -k-l an acre. It is clamicd that a neb in come of JL'2U,UUU a year is »"«de lrom its oOUO acres. At tho other end or the scale we may take a score of pio parties . 011 iinglisli avoids itii-tu iicavy lands, as well as on iNorlolk sands, which do not yield a/ profit of 0/ an acre or near it. I11 theory,...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
POTASH AND CROPS. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 14 February 1914

POTASH AND CROPS. Ono of tlio most striking effects ot potash manures is the remarkable way in which lliey promote the growth o! clover.-; and other leguminous plants. Tims when potasli is applied to a iiekl of mixed herbage, it encourages the growth of the clovers to such an ex tent that tlio general aspeet 01 the vegetation is entirely changed. It also encourages the growth of the finer and more nutritious grasses. A fur ther effect of potash is that it renders, the plant more resistant to the attacks: of fungoid parasites, well soon in tlio jase of rust on wheat, leaf-spot fun gus on mangolds, and even in some cases "finger and toe" in turnips. Potash is tlio dominant manurial in gredient for potatoes, where it not only improves tho quality, hut gives a high er yield, which contains a larger pro portion of marketable* size potatoes.

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A NEW JERSEY CHAMPION. [Newspaper Article] — Mortlake Dispatch — 14 February 1914

A NEW JERSEY CHAMPION. "What is the highest record wo can expect a dairy cow to mako?" is a query that has often been made. As it was'with tho trotting horse, 20 or 30 years ago, when animals began to ap pear that could trot a mile in Jess than thrco minutes, for instance, Maiulo S., making a record of 2.10, many thought that tlio speed limit of the horse liad been reached, and so it was with tho dairy oow. When Yeksa Sunbeam, a Guernsey, made her phenomenal re cord of S57 pounds of i'at in one year, it was doubted by many who had not studied thct breeding of dairy cows closely that her record would scarcely bo equalled, if ever excelled. Not long alter this. Colantha 'Lth's Johanna, a Holstein, made 99S pounds of fat, excel ling Yeksa Sunbeam's record by 141 pounds of fat. Here the world's re cord remained for several years, but it. was finally displaced by. Banostino Belle Do Kol, who made in one year 1058.34 pounds of fat. Jacoba Irene, with a yearly record of 9o-l lbs of fat hel...

Publication Title: Mortlake Dispatch
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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