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Elephind.com contains 12,833 items from Waynesburg Messenger, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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WashWton Oity Items. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

WashWton Oity Items. WASHINGTON CITY, Sept. 29.—Early this forenoon, the p ickets from Gen. Smith's position advanced to and now occupy Falls Church. Neither this nor the preceding movements met with any opposition whatever, as the rebel army had on Friday night retreated from the whole line of their position fronting Washington. Upton's Hill, this side of Falls Church, is necessarily included among the points now held by the federal forces. The works ofthe enemy at the p laces they had evacuated were , in a military view, almost worthless , beingnothing more than rifle pits of very common construction. The positions at Munson's and Murray's Hill afforded the rebels nearly an unobstructed view of all our fortifications and other defences. The appearance oftheground deserted by the rebels. indicates that they were deficient in those arrangements which serve to make a camp life comfortable , having no tents but merely shelters rudely constructed. There were no signs to show that...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
-_ -—. ._ • .-» — _ . _ More ofthe Fremont and Blair Difficulty—Blair Eeleased by Gen. Scott. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

-_ -—. ._ • .-» — _ . _ More ofthe Fremont and Blair Difficulty—Blair Eeleased by Gen. Scott. WASHINGTON , October 1.—From facts ascertained here , it appears that on Wednesday last Gen. Fremont released Col. Blair from arrest for using language in the order tantamount to a defiance of the General to present his charges formally. On Thursday, Col. Blair presented charges formally against Gen. Fremont, in response to the defiance. Thereupon, General Fremont immediately arrested Colonel Blair, and sent him to Jefferson Barracks. On Friday night tho telegraph was allowed to communicate the fact that Blair had been freed from arrest tho previous Wednesday, but the offensive paragraph in the order of release was suppressed, and the fact of of Col. Blair's second arrest witheld. The army regulations allow no officer to be arrested for a longer period than eight days without charges being preferred. Gen. Fremont disregarded the regulations in the case of Col. Blair. After this violat...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
&tautN.WB from Jeffeiwn €_ty. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

&_pa_tautN.WB from Jeffeiwn €_ty. JBFFBRSON CITY , September SO.—A special dispatch to the St. Louis Re publican says that Lieut. Col. Thacher;ofCol. Peabod y V Begiment , and Lieut. Tennalt , of Col. Marshall's Regiment; who were at Lexington , have arrived and give some interesting particulars from that place. They say that the rebels can easily turn out, and probably will, three 12 pounders per week at the Lexington foundry, and that they are very busy in making balls of all kinds. They report that the rebels have a large amount of'powder and ammunition of every variety buried in the vicinity of Lexington , and that they have recently dug up a great deal. Two thousand pounds of loaded shell were discovered by the rebels , in Mulligan's intrenchments on the very day of the surrender, our troops having no idea of their concealment , and they were deposited there for three months. It is said that vast amounts of ammunitions are buried in different quarters of the West ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Effects of the Surrender at Lexington. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

Effects of the Surrender at Lexington. A correspondent of the St. Louis Eepublican, writing from Jefferson City, the capital of Missouri, on the 23d inst., comments as follows upon the probable effects of the fall of Lexington. 'The actual loss of Lexington is trifling, compared to the disadvtage of its moral effect in the State, and the renewed hope, strength and confidence it will g ive to the cause of secession in Missouri. "The loyal citizens of ten to twenty counties in the northern and western parts ofthe State will be exposed to new persecutions and outrages, and abused and driven from their homes by the rebels. The fugitives here from variousqwartersfeel entirely disheartened, and know 'not wheat to tarn in the midst of their misfortunes. The Wlierabouts of Senator Breckinrid ge and Other Distinguished Kentucky Secessionists. Senator Breckenridga, with Keene Richards, arrived last S_nd»y night week at Prestonsburg, Floyd county, which joins the" Virginia boundary. ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
A Degenerate Son. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

A Degenerate Son. On die 25th inst, , a Federal detachment captured James B. Clay, with sixteen of his men, while on their way to join the forces ofthe rebel General Zollicotfer. To what infamy has a great name been reduced ! The son of Henry Clay taken in rebellion against the Union—plotting treason against Kentucky—plotting the ruin of all that his iminorlal father loved best, of all which adorned his name and will approve his gloiy to distant ages! There is a refinement of wickedness in the disloyalty of this man. which throws even John C. Brcckenridge into the shade, dwarfs all ordinary traitors into pigmies.— This attitude, too, must startle the country, for he is the son of gallant ' Harry of the West, Beyond that I he would be a common rebel, for he I l is not greatly blessed Avitb brains, i and has no influence save that name , I which he now draggles in infamy. — \ We are glad that he is arrested— i glad that the blood of Henry Clay, j even in the veins of a degener...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
-?— i The Enemy Falling Back on Manassas, &c. ! [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

-?— i The Enemy Falling Back on Manassas, &c. ! WASHTNOTON , October 2.—Contin- j ued evidence has been received here! to-day that the enemy is falling back ' on Manassas, making that permanent-1 l y his centre of operations. It is the impression here that a part of the Manassas force is going' to Kentucky, and the absence of a j large rebel force on the Upper Potomac confirms this. Hon. John A. Gurley is here on business connected with Fremont's command , of whose staff he is a member. The New York 37th denies having burned any of the property at the time ofthe advance to Munson's Hill, and charges it on the rebels. A Mr. Haley, just arrived from Charleston, says that Fort Sumter has been prepared for a siege in anticipation of an attack on Charleston.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
When the Battle May be Expected. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

When the Battle May be Expected. The public must not be impatient for the clashing of the two great armies now approaching each other in ihe centre of Missouri. The best information from Lexington is to the the effect that General Price will make his stand at that city with the main bod y of his army, and perhaps choose as his vantage ground the very entrenchments which were so gallantly and successfully defended b y Col. Mulligan. To reach him , therefore, and give him decisive battle even within ten days time , will require extraordinary exertion on the part of General Fremont. He has forwarded to Jefferson city an immense quantity of army baggage, including artillery and ammunition , the transportation of which will be comparativel y easy and rapid by railroad to Sedalia, but the movement of which across the country by wagons will necessarily be difficult and slow. If the enemy therefore should not advance and give battle "at some point South of Lexington , we must not lo...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Eeported Movement Against New Orleans-More Men For McOulloch. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

Eeported Movement Against New Orleans-More Men For McOulloch. ST. LOUIS , October 3.—The "Eepublican" learns that a letter has been received here from New Orieans , date not g iven, that a fleet of seventy vessels, large and small, was then comingup the Balize to attack that city. The "BepuWican" also learns from a citizen of this State who left Richmond a week ago last Monday, that he 8aw,% ina paper on the route, a proclamation from Ben. McCullochi calling on the citizens of Mississippi, Tennessee and Arkansas for fiftoes. regiments of men for sei dec •irrMissouri.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
McOlellan and His Generals. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

McOlellan and His Generals. Bayard Taylor, in describing a recent review of the Union troops, says:—I had an opportunity of contrasting McClcllan with a score of Generals and princes. There was McDowell, Porter, Keyes, Blenker, Smith and Marcy, all manly, gallant faces, and figures of true military bearing; Cols. De Trobriand and Salm Salm, with their dashing, chivalresque air; thePrince de Joinville, twisted and stooping, lounging on his horse ; the Orleans Princes, with their mild, amiable faces and aspect of languid interist—in all, a most remarkable group of figures. A horse's length in advance sat the smallest man ofthe party, broad-shouldered, strong-chested, strong-necked and strong-jawod, one hand upon his hi p, while the other, by an occasional rapid motion, flung some communication to the passing squadron of cavalry. The visor ofhis cap was well pulled down over his eyes, yet not a man in the lines escaped his observation; his glance seemed to take in at once the w...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
1 »» 1 From Missouri. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

1 »» 1 From Missouri. JEFFERSON CITY, October 2.—A special dispatch to the St, Louis "Eepublican" says: Gen. Fremont continues to be actively occupied, and the various division commanders have had interviews with him to-day. His programme is said by those in his confidence to be excellent in every particular, and to have met the approval of all the military authorities to whom be has disclosed it. Since his arrival here, confidence in the Federal cause has greatly increased, and it is now believed that before tho end of the month Missouri will bo purged of her secession foes. The steamer Emma left for Lexington this evening to convey our wounded to the hospitals in St. Louis. Col. Phillip St. George Cooke, ofthe 2d United States Dragoons ' arrived hero this evening, and had a lengthy private interview with General Fremont. His force of regulars from Utah will no doubt be ordered to this vicinity for service. It is said that a Brigadier Generalship will be conferred upon him....

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
People in New Orleans Terribly Alarmed. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

People in New Orleans Terribly Alarmed. A letter has just lieen received from I an officer on board the U. S. steamer ! Niagara, ofthe blockading squadron, I which states that the latest news i from New Orleans represents that ' there is much suffering and distress j there. Placards were posted on the ! streets, a few nights ago. inscribed ! " Lincoln and Bread .'" "Jeff. Davis and Starvation!'' There are great I apprehensions of Fremont's descent [ down ihe Mississippi river, and if he comes many are ready to join him. The blockade of New Orleans isclosed, and becoming closer every day.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
1 «» 1 Fiffhtin Western Virginia. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

1 «» 1 Fiffhtin Western Virginia. CINCINNATI, October 3.—A Kanawha correspondent ofthe Commercial says four companies ofthe First Kentucky regiment, four companies of the 34th Ohio, and one company of the Fifth Virginia, under Lieut. Col. Enyart, surrounded and attacked the rebels at Chapmanville, and after a short engagement completely routed them, killing sixty and taking seventy prisoners. The rebels in escaping were interrupted by Col. Iliatt, who killed forty and took a large number prisoners. The country between Charleston and the Guyandotte river is now freed from secession power.— This is the most effectual blow given the rebels in this part of the valley. When the Kanawha left Charleston, there was a report of a battle going on between Cox and Floyd and Wise, at Jewel Mountain. The rebels were getting the worst of it, and falling back upon their entrenchments at Lewishnr «-.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
4 « ».«¦. » ——NOTICE. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

4 « ».«¦. » ——NOTICE. Dr. WHITTLESEY will make his next visit to Waynesburg, on Monday and Tuesday, the 4th and 5th days of November. It is desirable, upon hispart, that as many as conveniently can, (of those now under his care ,) will call upon the first day, as upon the second I am sometimes so thronged that it is impossible for me to do justice to all, and my visit cannot possibly be prolonged.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Maysville Eepoitcd Occupied by Rebels, [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

Maysville Eepoitcd Occupied by Rebels, CAIRO, October 1.—The troops stationed at Norfolk , Mo., have been ordered to Bird's Point. There are reports in circulation to the effect that General Polk , with twenty thousand men, has taken possession of Maysville, Kentucky. Eyerything is quiet here and at Paducah.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Blair's (Barges Against Fremont. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

Blair's (Barges Against Fremont. The charges preferred by Colonel B»ir against General Fremont have been seat to Washington. Among them are, that Gen. Lyon was unnecessarily sacrificed, and that Colonel Mulligan Could have been reinforced before Gen. Price made his presence known near Lexington. The matter was discussed in a Cabinet meeting, and the rusult will probabl y be made known through the medium of a General Order. The Administration, and especially Gen. Cameron , desires to give Gen. Fremont every opportunity consistent with the public interest to restore Missouri to the Union cause.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

tUR'.! FAIR!! riMIE Orcein; Ciiun-y Atrfcnhllral SuriiUy will hnlil J. it* .\ hull Annual - air lit C_iruii<;li;i«ts, on Thimitny.-mil Friday, the llllli anil llth of October, lSfil.— Their (iiniincls are lieaiilil'ully located,and well adapted to 1 he purposes of tin; Exliihilion. A large number of stalls and pens for slocK have lieen provided, and an excellent well within tl.e enclosure affords ample water for any ordinary demand. THE TRACK is smooth, solid, and almost entirely level. The Society has erected a large FLORA.!. HALL for the benefit of exhibitor* in this department. E_hihitor* need, therefore, have no fears of their articles beht£ damaged by sudden slornis which not nnfrequent-)y 01-cur at this season. The Society's f*retnium List i* large, and premiumliberal. The friends of Aerictlltuie and the public generally are invited to attend. HENRY JAMISON, President. E. II. IUII.Y, Secretary. Sept. * - _, ISO I. AGRICULTURAL. The Seventh annual exhibition of the J...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
PEES-DEUT LINCOLN AND FEE MONT'B PBOOLAMATION. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

PEES-DEUT LINCOLN AND FEE MONT'B PBOOLAMATION. We clip the following editorial paragraph from the Pittsburgh Dispatch: "President Lincoln has made no mistake since he came into the Presidential chair BO great as that of interfering with the r proclamation of Gen. Fremont. We have refrained all along from finding fault with his war policy, or that ofhis Cabinet, but * the outspeaking of the people is unmistakable. Could he but mingle among them—not among Republicans only, but among Democrats—he would feel that he has committed a very grave error. It is an almost universal sentiment, we believe, that if any property of traitors and rebels is to be confiscated, slave, above ill, should not be exempt." The "Dispatch" is not the only Abolition print that denounces Mr. Lincoln for man-I fully insisting upon the observance of LAW. Nearly every radical Republican paper we have seen, and nearly even' Republican politician, and all "the little dogs," "Tray, Blanche and Sweetheart," ar...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
AHOTHEE COMPANY POE THE WAE [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

AHOTHEE COMPANY POE THE WAE The "Pursley Home Guards," at present under command of our gallant friend, JOHN A. GORDON', Esq., "arc recruiting for active service, and expect to join Gen. HOWELL'S Regiment." There is every probability ofthe company soon filling its \ ranks. This company is composed of No. J 1 men—men who are influenced by pure, patriotic motives—and should they enter the service, will give a good account of themselves. The company will elect officers after they have succeeded in procuringl a full complement of men. They will be men ;of their own choosing. i "Little Greene" is doing nobly in the struggle for the Union and Constitution . A second Company from Waynesburg, de-Bigned for Gen. HOWELL'S Regiment, left for Camp Lafayette at Uniontown on Tuesday last. It is composed of -vigorous and gallant young fellows , and will do credit to the county.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
JEFFEESON FAIB [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

JEFFEESON FAIB The Fair of the Jefferson Agricultural Society, which comes off at Jefferson on Thursday and Friday the 17th and 18th in_t., promises to be a hi ghly creditable exhibition, and will doubtless be attended by "every body and his wife" or sweetheart- The list of premiums is large, and ¦ we trust our farmers, stock-growers and mechanics generall y will contribute something to the exhibition. It will certainly be -A. Fair of the season. EBROKS.—Several typographical blunders occurred in our editorial, last week, in some instances destroying the sense: as "foul eipreuim of disloyalty, " instead of aspersion, "work forth for" the ticket, instead of "workjj*£ *c

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
GEEAT FEESHET [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

GEEAT FEESHET Our Pittsburgh exchanges are filled with details of the losses by the late sudden rise in the Monongahela, Allegheny and Ohio rivers, and their tributaries. The creeks in this county were all much swollen, and a great deal of property was destroyed. At Pittsburgh, the "Post" informs ue "the fall of water was uninterrupted for twenty four hours, and the rise of the water was very rapid. The Monongahela rose first, but in a few hours the Allegheny commenced pouring down and the two rivers joined their powerful currents into an angry and destructive flood. On Saturday afternoon the water was at 27 feet, and it continued rising until it reached between 20 and 30 feet. All day on Saturday and Sunday the surface of the Allegheny was covered with timber, shingles, oil in barrels, and other property which had been lying along the banks of the rivers not well secured. An immense number of rafts of boards and timber have been carried away. In the lower part of Allegheny ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
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