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Elephind.com contains 658,475 items from Columbia Daily Spectator, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 3,306 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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School of Mines. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 May 1879

School of Mines. SEVENTY-NINE will be ready to graduate in " Duck on the Rock," if in nothing else. THERE is a probability of 'BO going to Lake Superior for the Summer Mining School. SEVERAL members of 'B2 have earned laurels for themselves in athletics. MR. RUPP is printing plans of the new college buildings by the blue process, for the benefit of the engineers. MR. LAUDY has hung several transparencies of celebrated pictures in the windows of Dr. Chandler's museum. AMONG the other photographs taken of the college, on the 7th, was one of Dr. Chandler's lecture room, arranged for a lecture on sugar. PROFESSOR ROOD has introduced athletics into his lectures to 'B2. What a sight it was to see the athletes parade before the class. Who says the class is deficient in muscle. THE second year men have ordered for the Machine School work of June a book somewhat larger than, though of the general style of a composition book with fifty pages of drawing paper in the back. DR. CHANDLER'S lectur...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE COLLEGE WORLD [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 May 1879

THE COLLEGE WORLD Cornell: — The Spring Regatta will be held during Commencement week. The races to take place will be given hereafter. The Cornellian has been somewhat delayed on account of its enormous size. It contains about 200 pages, and is replete with news for every student. Mr. F. P. Rundell has been chosen Review editor from the Philalethian society, to fill a vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Mr. J. L. Knapp. The Sage ladies of 'BO, 'Bl and 'B2 gave a reception to the ladies of '79- O ne hundred and twenty invitations were issued, and the entertainment was the social event of the season. The navy directors had their regular meeting on Tuesday, April 29th. The committee on crew reported that three men had been selected, viz : Lewis, 79, Shinkle, 'Bl, and Allen, 'Bl. We are indeed very unfortunate. The United States government seems to have an unsatisfiable claim upon our professors. Three professors have been ruthlessly snatched from us in as many months by this devo...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
OUR EXCHANGES. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 May 1879

OUR EXCHANGES. WE will positively never attempt to classify our exchange Lits. again. Because we happened not to admire a political article in the Hamilton Lit. its editors searched through our columns, found an ungrammatical sentence and quoted it as an example of how utterly depraved a paper that mentioned athletics might become. Our spirits were burdened down, and if The Princetonia7i had not soon arrived we might have yielded to grief. We quote at length from its substantial columns on the subject of " An I. C. P. A." The SMALL CAPS are our own. "Whether it would be practicable to collect in any one place at a time convenient to all representatives of the larger part of the papers is a question which would have to be settled affirmatively before any such association could be formed, UNLESS, INDEED, THE ASSOCIATION SHOULD BE CONFINED TO THE MORE INFLUENTIAL JOURNALS ONLY, BY WHICH COURSE WE SHOULD BE SPARED THE CRUSH OCCASIONED BY THE TWO HUNDRED, MORE OR LESS, REPRESENTATIVES OF...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
SHAVINGS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 May 1879

SHAVINGS. ARURALIST, being asked what he thought ot the recent scandal, replied that it might work very well; but he should still use kerosene. — Ex. SCENE on a freshman surveying expedition. Freshman squinting through the theodolite. Professor comes up behind and adjusts the instrument. Freshman, loquitur: "Take your dirty paws off'n there." Tableau. — Williams Athenaeum. SCENE. —Cambridge High School, class in Mythology. Teacher : " Who was Hebe ?" First Girl: "Wife of Heracles and first cousin of Sir Joseph Porter, K. C. B."- — Crimson. PRETTY Jennie came to me. Earnest, seeking information : " Cousin, darling, will you show What is meant by osculation ?" What could mortal man as I Do in such a situation ? Father, mother, no one nigh, Liberal views, a great temptation ! Jennie is my cousin, too ; So to please my young relation — Ah ! you horrid thing, there ! now ! I referred to occultation. Yale Record. THE following is such an immense joke we must insert it here. " The Junior c...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1879

The Columbia Spectator. Published Semi-Monthly by the Students of Columbia College. VOL. IV. NO. VIII. NEW YORK, JUNE Ist, 1879. WHOLE NO. 37. Board of Editors, 1879-1880. WILLIAM S. SLOAN, 'Bl, Managing Editor. WILLIAM F. MORGAN, 'BO, Business Editor. WILLIAM H. TAYLOR, 'BO. WILLIAM B. MCVICKAR, 'BO. J. DUANE LIVINGSTON, 'BO. REGINALD H. SAYRE, 'Bl. GEORGE H. TAYLOR, 'Bl. WILLIAM K. OTIS, 'B2. C. D. STARR, 'Bl, S. of M. A. GERALD HULL, 'B2, S. of M. CHARLES E. CALDWELL, B. A., S. of L. TERMS. Per annum, (18 numbers.) in advance, - $2.00. Single copies, - - - - - -15 cts. Remittances by mail should be addressed to HENRY G. PAINE, Treasurer, No. 26 West 30th Street, N. Y. Exchanges, contributions, and all other communications should be addressed to THE COLUMBIA SPECTATOR, Columbia College, N. Y. Students and graduates of the various departments of Columbia are requested to contribute articles, verses, letters, and information.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CURRENT TOPICS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1879

CURRENT TOPICS. IT has been deliberated lately whether it would not prove advantageous to have the Law School moved up town to the new buildings. This has been so seriously thought of, that the Literary Societies are not to have rooms in the new buildings as was first suggested, the Trustees knowing that there would be no waste room if four or five hundred young men met there every day for the purposes of law education. If such a step is taken, from a social aspect, it would be very pleasant. Students do not realize that Columbia is a University, and, in fact, few know where the Law School is situated. The college spirit would be strengthened, and the effect of so large a body of young men being thrown together, would develop a more manly spirit. By all means let this moving be done and done next fall, when the academic department moves. EIGHTY-TWO has placed itself in a pretty fix. In a rash and hasty manner, amidst great clamor and talk, the Harvard challenge was accepted. Unfortu...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE CRIBBER AND THE GRIND. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1879

THE CRIBBER AND THE GRIND. AN IDYL OF EXAMINATION WEEK. THE cribber sits in his room at night, And mysterious scrolls of paper, white And long and narrow, as best he may, He covers with writing against the day Of his examination. The grind, as he studies Latin and Greek, Or Calculus till his eyes are weak, With study and continuous strain, Prepares himself with an overworked brain For his examination. Oh ! who will get on the better, think you, The cribber whose cribs won't work and who, Fearing detection, and hopelessly sunk In ignorance, is expecting to flunk In his examination ; Or the grind whose sole ambition is marks, Who has crammed with nonsense and aorists and arcs In wild confusion, his weak little brain ; All which to unravel, he'll try in vain At his examination ? The answer truly is hard to find— Whether the cribber or whether the grind Is the better man ; but best of all Will he pass who grinds not nor cribs at all Through his examination. C.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE CLASS OF '79. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1879

THE CLASS OF '79. THE course of '79 is almost run. Her sons, brave and true (and good looking), are making their final preparations to step from the calm dignity, and quiet of academic life into the wild struggles and noisy bustlings of the world. It would not be hard to trace the future course of some of the members of this famous class. Some will doubtless become great lawyers and go to Congress, where, you may depend on it, they will begin by abolishing the Fourth of July and Washington's Birthday, for fear G. W. may have been a society man, or the leader of some grand combination, you know. They would also think it hardly safe to elect a President, for the same reasons ; indeed they will exercise their ingenuity in every possible way to discover new lines of originality. One or two may become judges in the Supreme Court, and then won't their Burgess' cribs be useful ! Some will start out in their course of law and will get rich, some will never be heard of again after the brilli...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
LINES FROM SHAKSPEARE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1879

LINES FROM SHAKSPEARE. CORRECTED TO DATE. HONOR is the subject of my story, Of which Crane also spoke at Semi-Annual — I cannot tell what you and other men Think of this life ; but, for my single self, I had as lief go up the spout as grind In these old stuccoed walls, only to scoop in zeroes. I was born free as Caesar ; so were you : We both have fed as well, Tor we have both Put up at the same house with Caesar ; And we can both endure the winter's cold As well as he, and better too If we had Prof. M-rr-m's gloves. For once upon a raw and gusty day, The troubled Harlem chafing with its shores, Caesar said to me, " Dar'st thou, Cassius, now Leap in, and swim to yonder point?" Accoutered as I was, with a new spring ulster And straw hat, I plunged in. But ere we could arrive the point propos'd, Caesar cry'd, " Help me, Cassius, or I sink." I, as Frank Rees, our former captain, Dicl from the waves of Harlem Bear forth the noble Brown, So did I the tired Caesar. He had the ague when he...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
EIGHTY-ONE'S CLASS SUPPER. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1879

EIGHTY-ONE'S CLASS SUPPER. TWENTY-SIX members of Eighty-One sat down to a subscription class-supper at the Union Square Hotel on Wednesday evening, May 28th. A feeling of relief, that is experienced at no other time of the year, was felt by all, as on that very day Stubbs' Constitutional History had been consigned to a grave of forgetfulness by the solemn rites of examination. Jollity was the order, and at ten o'clock the table was cleared for the feast of reason that was to follow the flow of . The toasts were excellent, and responded to by some very good speeches, that of Mr. Vail, which was last, being deservedly listened to. In the absence of Mr. Forster, Mr. Garr responded to the first toast by reading a letter from that gentleman. Between each toast an appropriate song was sung. The Committee of Arrangements were Messrs. Rambaut (Chairman), Mills, Sullivan Smith, and Montgomery. Mr. I'eck arranged the toasts, but unfortunately was not able to be present to answer to the toast ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE BURIAL OF THE ANCIENT. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1879

THE BURIAL OF THE ANCIENT. ;r PWAS the night of Decoration day; a day on -L which millions, all over this vast Republic, had been decking with garlands the graves of slaughtered heroes. What fitter time than this, in sooth, to go through once more, sad, crematory exercises over the grave of slaughtered Bojesen ; Bojesen, the bogy of the giddy fresh, the bane of the otherwise jolly soph ? Accordingly at ten at night, summoned by lugubrious, black bordered invitations, embellished with emblematical and harrowing designs (as witness cut at head of this article), worded in language which must have filled even the expired soul of Bojesen himself with envy, came to the Worth Monument crowds of more or less sorrowing mourners, according as thoughts of grief or beer had gained the mastery. Giving way to their feelings in loud cries and howls, they donned the insignia of mourning and formed the line of march. First came a platoon of Capt. Williams' Minions next the Grand Marshal, in all the ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
RECENT COLLEGE LEGISLATION. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1879

RECENT COLLEGE LEGISLATION. THE two notices given below are entirely self-ex-planatory and we commend them to the most careful perusal of every student. TUITION FEES—IMPORTANT NOTICE. By an amendment to the statutes of the College, adopted, by the Trustees, May sth, 1879, the discretionary power heretofore entrusted to the President and Treasurer jointly, to extend the time of payment of tuition fees to a date later than that at which the student begins to attend, is withdrawn. As the statutes now stand, no student can attend any College exercise, until his tuition fee has been paid. The ensuing academic year will commence on Monday, the sixth day of October next. All who expect to matriculate at the beginning of the session, will come prepared to make payment on that day. The foregoing provisions do not apply to scholars on foundations, nor to students entitled to free tuition under existing statutes, or under any unrepealed resolution of the Trustees. By order of the Trustees. F. ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Of Absences Form College Exercises. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1879

Of Absences Form College Exercises. From and after the close of the present academic year, excuses for absence from college exercises will not be required or received. Any student whose absences during any session, in any department, shall exceed one-fourth of the total number of exercises in that department for the same session, will be debarred from the ensuing semi-annual examination in that department, and will cease to be a candidate for a degree. Any student, who, for such reason, shall be liable to be debarred from more than two departments during the same session, shall, ipso facto, cease to be a member of the College. In case a student is absent for more than one-fourth of the time, on account of illness or other cause beyond his control, he may be relieved from the operation of the foregoing provisions by act of the Faculty. Every such case must be considered on its own merits. Mr. Merriam, in order to reward the faithful attendance of the students in his volunteer Greek c...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CORRESPONDENCE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1879

CORRESPONDENCE. To the Editors of THE SPECTATOR : IN your last number I noticed an article by " Patriarch," in which he complains that English does not hold so high a place in the College studies as it should, that it is, in fact, "at a discount." Now, we join with him heartily in hoping that in future more attention may be given to this very important branch of college education, yet we think it is hardly fair to say that it is at a discount. A great deal of trouble has been spent in the endeavor to make the course in rhetoric, especially in declamation, to which I believe " Patriarch " particularly refers, as thorough and complete as possible. With this view, the College engaged a professor of elocution, in addition to the regular professor of rhetoric, intending to give the students a fair opportunity to become good speakers; but the plan failed, chiefly on account of the bad behavior of the class, for at times it was so frolicsome that the presence of the Professor of English, a...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
ABOUT COLLEGE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1879

ABOUT COLLEGE. THE future member of 'B3 that has fallen asleep in his examination chair dreams a very enjoyable future. After the Burial, for every sub-freshman goes to that, his mind naturally refers to the urn of '69 that adorns the campus and in the smoke issuing from this, the ideal picture of Columbia points out to him—the Rush where soph, and fresh, contend for supremacy, and where he sees the cane and high hats broken and longs to be in it and shout for '83 —next he sees the Columbiad and Miner and the faint outline of the Goodwood, fit emblems of his junior year—then far off he notices the seniors listening to their Valedictorian and the vision of that beautiful monogram of' 79 with its appropriate motto "Opcc TE\6s is naturally associated with it. Of course he takes THE SPECTATOR and with a copy of that near him he slumbers, dreaming he is a college man. We will leave him there and not disturb him. OF all sad words of youth or lass, The saddest are these, "you did not pass....

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Sub-Freshmanne's Dreame. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1879

Sub-Freshmanne's Dreame.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
School of Mines. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1879

School of Mines. FABULOUS sums have been lost and won during the past two weeks at pitching pennies. THE machine class will probably commence operations on June 3d. Seventeen men have enlisted. DR. CHANDLER and Dr. Waller are members of the University Club. The former is one of the Directors. THE books to be used for the reports of the work to be done at the iron works next month have appeared, and give general satisfaction. WE are compelled to retract certain obituary remarks we made a month or two since. '7s's ivy, whose death we deplored, has, under the influence of the May sun, bloomed out in all its pristine vigor. HIGH times in the Qualitative Lab. last week. One of the men who passed in Calculus has estimated, bv the method of infinitesimals, that there were not less than two thousand pounds of broken glass on the floor. IT is a settled thing that the Mining Engineers of 'BO are to go to Lake Superior for their summer work. They will go to Buffalo by rail, and the rest of the...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
School of Law. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1879

School of Law. THE students of the Law School are to be congratulated on the addition of Judge Dillon to the faculty, as Professor of General Jurisprudence and Lecturer on Federal and Municipal Law. Judge Dillon has already sent in his resignation to President Hayes, of the United States Circuit Judgeship in the lowa District, now held by him, to take effect on September ist. The association of so distinguished a jurist with Prof. Dwight, cannot but raise the already high standard of the school, and must be regarded as a new evidence of the liberal spirit of enterprise now pervading all departments of the college. IN one way, the addition of a popular professor to the faculty will be regarded as a calamity, inasmuch as it will render the lack of suitable and comfortable accommodations of every kind, if possible, more painfully apparent. IN this connection, we may add that it is rumored on very good authority that on the erection of another new building on the college grounds, to rep...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE COLLEGE WORLD. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1879

THE COLLEGE WORLD. Amherst:— Class of '69 will probably have a decennial reunion this year. The junior class of Troy Polytechnic visited the cabinets recently. German division of the juniors just began Hermann and Dorothea. The nine played the third game of the season, with the Sharps, Saturday, May 10. It was a very close contest, and resulted in a score of five to five after thirteen innings. The Olio editors report a deficit of $6O, with copies enough on hand to reduce it to $5O. This amount seems small when it is remembered that the Olio contained double the usual number of cuts. If college nines are going to indulge in such little eccentricities as Harvard has shown, would it not be well to form an Inter-collegiate B. B. Association with an executive committee, to whom such cases shall be referred ?— Amhei'st Student. Harvard: — At a recent meeting of the H. U. B. C., it was decided to have Harvard represented at Saratoga by a four and single. A special match between H. H. Lee,...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE LIBRARY. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 June 1879

THE LIBRARY. HHHE SECRET OF SUCCESS ; or, How to Get X on in the World. With some remarks upon True and False success, and the art of making the best use of life. By W. H. Davenport Adams. American edition edited by P. G. H. New York, 1879. G. P. Putnam's Sons. While, as the author says in his Preface, that he has no peculiar or wonderful " Secret " to unfold, yet the "Secret of Success" is vividly portrayed in its pages. The book is summed up in the line from Longfellow, which appears on the title page, "The talent of success is nothing more than doing what you can do well." It is an interesting work, and the reader will feel repaid by its perusal. The chapters are nine in number, and their titles will show the character of the book. 1. " Time, and Its Uses ;" 2. " Aims in Life 3. " A Steady Purpose 4. " The Three P's—Punctuality, Prudence, Perseverance;" 5. " Business Habits ;" 6. " Business Men and Business Notes ;" 7. " The Race and the Athlete 8. "Self-Help;" 9. "Reasonable Ser...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
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