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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1897

fjpmjvmp w '4pfiyi'iiirv?gHflW''''''l,'''fy'y'' '' "" THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 77 Brought into existence but five years ago, through the generosity of Mother Katharine Drexel of Philadelphia, and the energy and devotion of Reverend Isidore Ricklin and the Sisters of St. Francis, the institution has leaped from infancy to a position of recognized in fluence over the entire reservation. Its progress has been phenomenal, its labors well blessed and its efforts in the interest of religion and education crowned with the brightest jewel of success. To spend a day as its welcome guest, to attend the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass in the chapel with the children, fro witness their respectful bearing and behavior in the presence of the Blessed Sacrament is sufficient to mellow the heart of a heathen and furnish food for a christian soul. On the playground and in the yard the labor of patience is no less apparent; meet the pupils when you will or where you will and up goes the little hand to remove t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1897

ffpmasssssssssKS iir ft Ti 78 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. il Some time afterward, in talking with the Indians about the events of the campaign, the warrior who had spoken with such admiration of Father Craft, referred with the same affectionate enthusiasm to Father Jutz, and said that when the infuriated Indians at tacked the agency on hearing of the slaughter at Wounded Knee, they had sent word to the mission that no one there need be afraid. " We told him to stay where he was and no Indian would disturb him," said the warrior. He told how the priest and sisters had fed the starving refugees and bound up the wounds of the survivors who es caped the slaughter, and then after a pause he said: "He is a brave man; braver than any Indian." Curious to know why this man had not joined the hostiles, among whom were several of his near relatives, I asked him the question. His reply was simple. "I had a little boy at the Drexel mission, he died and Father Jutz put a white stone over him. That is wh...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1897

m u vifi jpjfi THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 79 (53 for fair dealing and liberal-mindodness the malignancy of our enemies has in oculated with the poison of distrust many, alas too many otherwise intelli gent citizens who now look askance and shake their heads dubiously at the least intimation of truth being found in the Catholic Church; for they have long been persuaded that, like Nazareth, nothing good could come from Rome. Through the misleading influence of sectarian intolerance they consider the church as a dangerous despotism, in imical to the Republic, and hostile to all other forms of religion. We re member reading in tho Sacred Scrip ture, II. Peter 2:1, that "as there were also false prophets among the people, even so shall there be among you lying teachers;" and consequently it is not matter for surprise to find puritanical fanaticism and bigotry, for more than a century, slandering the Catholic Church as un-American and condemn ing Catholics as depraved members of the body politi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1897

!gWgBBEJ, 1 J H BHM 80 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. them interested in its contents, is the question that agitated the minds of the pioneer in the work of this Apostolate. Can wo get an attentive and respective audience, full of interest in religious questions, was douhtingly asked. We have but to consult the bulletins of the work, which are issued periodically, to convince even the most skeptical that now, if ever, is the time to put forth the most strenous efforts for the reclama tion of the best element of Protestant tism. The lectures have excited the curi osity and fixed the inquiring attention of the more thoughtful portion of every community thus far visited. Surfeited unto . nausea with one side and that invariably the dark side of the story, the public would now hear the other side, namely: the truth of the Catholic Church, and that from her own duly accredited organs, the priests of the Church. We have mentioned the favorable conditions attending the work of the Apostolate; but is...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1897

TTJ-.l IsflfV J ' 7 f'V vy w?- "-.-"VJT" THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 81 anco of this mission and to perpetuate His work, Jesus Christ established an indestructible society of men and women, which is destinguished from all other societies by its union with Peter and his successors as its visible official head, and to which society he committed the instruction of mankind in all matters pertaining to faith and morals under a guarantee of infallibili ty, so as to effectually preserve it from all error both in believing and teaching; that this society still exists, and still believes and teaches without fear of error the truths received from its divine founder; and that thereforo in this society man possesses and will possess to the end of time an infallible teacher from whom he can obtain a knowledge of the facts and laws which constitute the spiritual world. This fact is a matter of simple human history. It resolves itself into three questions, 1. Did Jesus Christ come into the world as the t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1897

82 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. she is a pervert, a renegade to the di vine trust which Christ reposed in her when he launched her forth on her glorious mission to all ages. This must be so we must have more or less ex planation of dogma and refutation of errors, but not so much nor in such a manner as to pall the taste for that in terior life of the church to a more inti mate acquaintance with which the Apostolate of the Word earnestly and cordially invites our non-Catholic brethren. In Holy Writ it is said of heaven: "that eye hath not seen, nor ear heard the joys nor hath it entered into the heart of man what things God hath prepared for them that love him. If the veil were drawn and our non Catholic friends could see; if they could but know the foretaste of heav enly joys reserved to those who live the inner life of grace and union with Jesus; knowing they would admire; and, admiring, ardently yearn to be absorbed and lost to themselves and the misery of this world in the fathomless aby...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1897

r 'wfgTggHpyiiijyjwij-ifjir iiyy"yyw-y-'itp ' wk!!4'!lJ$y?v'l,-l, tmvw TT THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 83 divine truth. The spirit of the age cannot be said to be markedly religious and, although Archbishop Ireland be lieves, and perhaps rightly, that the instinct of religion is implanted in their hearts, the American people are not free from the materialistic tenden cies which much of modern thought, miscalled scientific, gives to the minds of men. The age is not an age of rev erence. A wide-spread skepticism has promoted the growth of scoffing un belief. Speaking aside of the Church Catholic, religion, through its ministers and preachers, shows a sad subser viency to the demands of infidelity that the mysteries of faith be accounted for out of natural causes proceeding from natural rules. The Protestant pulpit in America either discards the super natural entirely, or speaks of it with hesitating and bated breath, fearing the worldling's ridicule. It has more respect for the opinions of me...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1897

" i' sTtrcp'JTr v """v pij 84 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. "Kamloops Wawa." AVondorful has been the success of Catholic missionary work among the Indians. But when we consider the zeal and self-denial of the missionaries the results are not so wonderful These missionaries have made use of every means to spread the Gospel and to teach the Indian, but perhaps the most unique missionary enterprise occurred at Kamloops, near Vancouver. A number of years ago a French priest named Jean Marie Raphael le Jeune came to that region to labor among the Indians. Beginning after the manner of the old time mission aries, who had made for themselves places in the history of N.orth America, this priest learned the language of each of the twenty tribes who were found in his spiritual domain so that he could freely communicate with them all. This great task he accomplished, be cause of a natural apUtude as a linguist, after a brief residence with each tribe. This done he started in to educate the entire numbe...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1897

'-"Tnr vr-f TfRT- VTIfrffW- X """".'"iWJP!" THE INDTAN ADVOCATE.' 85 Nevertheless the missionary got out the first number of his periodical in 1890 and since May 2, 1891, it has ap peared monthly. lie called the paper the Kamloops Waiua, wawa being an Indian word meaning both to spGak and to echo. Translated the title is Echoes from Kamloops. Having no type the missionary wrote out the entire paper and then mimeo graphed it. By this process enough copies were struck oil to circulate through all the tribes of the district, the white paper being furnished by be nevolent people interested in the work. The paper had four pages, each a trifle more than four by seven inches largo, including the white margin. The success from an educational point of view of this little periodical was vory much greater than the mis sionary had hoped for. Not only did it interest and please his wards but it was approved by the Bishop under whom the missionary labored and copies of it were sent to Home and to...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1897

5953XBER3 86 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. and was the founder of the Missoula Mission. This, to-day, is one of the greatest missions in the west and is still in the charge of the Jesuits. For seventeen years Father Hoecken was stationed at Missoula visiting all the surrounding tribes. These trips were made on Indian ponies oftimes lasting six or seven months and were attended with fearful hardships. The mission aries living among the Indians, away from civilization were compelled to live like the Indians, using the same food and wearing the same garb. They learned the language of the tribes and Father Hoecken was a master of no less than six Indian dialects. Afterward Father Hoecken worked for several years among the Indians of the Osage nation. Immediately after his return east irom the Rockies, Fath er Hoecken's field of work was Cincin nati. There he labored among the negroes of Saint Anne's parish and also served as chaplain of the prisons and hospitals, a position in which he was succe...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1897

,tffi,VffmmiVVmVWVr''m ''wmu WW!' "W '- W&V vi p-r-w vfwpTsysBrrj-rr- THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 87 who applaud his manly stand, and show their own classical education in the use of such expressive phrases as "you're a bully follow, " and the strict, yet proper discipline of the parochial school, dazzle and confuse the boy into the desire of having his name appear on the common school roll. With the experience and observalion of years to guide the Catholic parent, with the right that belongs to his office, with the words of those in authority in the church, the duty of the Catholic parent is plain. No words or coaxing of a child should lead a parent into forgctfulness of his office. The child is not competent to judge for himself in this matter. He has an imperfect knowledge and must be directed. The boy or girl, as the case may be, must be told that a perfect education is only characteristic of Catholic training schools. Here alone are secular and divine knowledge imparted by teacher...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1897

'wi.r.TVfjf wumis liitfgf 88 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Writton for tho Adooatb. The History of Indian Tribes in the Twin Territories. HI. CHEROKEE INDIANS. "The mountaineers of aboriginal America were tho Cherokoes, who oc cupied the upper valley of the Tennes see River as far west as Muscle Shoals, and the highlands of Carolina, Georgia, and Alabama, most picturesque and most salubrious region east of the Mis sissippi. Their homes were encircled by blue hills rising beyond hills, of which the lofty peaks would kindle with the early light, and the overshad owing ridges envelope the valleys like a mass of clouds. There the rocky cliffs, rising in naked grandeur, defy, the lightning and mock the loudest peals of the thunder-storm; there the gentler slopes are covered with mag nolias and flowering forest trees, decor ated with roving climbers, and ring with the perpetual note of the whip-poor-will; there the wholesome water gushes profusely from the earth in transparent springs; snow-white ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1897

PF" THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 89 JWWBPWSfH ft nossee, the majority on the other and in the valley. The former were called Otari, mountaineers, the latter Erati, or inhabitants of the lowlands. Inter marriage between members of a clan was prohibited by strict laws, yet a Cherokee could marry at once a mother and her daughter. The clans often disputed with one a'nother; fights and blood-shed were the results. "In the early days of the Cherokoe people no warrior thought himself se cure until ho had addressed his guard ian angel, and no hunter ever dreamed of success until before the rising sun he had asked the assistance of his God, to whom on his return at eventide, he forgot not to offer sacrifice. And thus the early Indian, though having no es tablished religion, believed in a God and worshipped Him." (Foster.) They acquired these ideas from the faithful Catholic missionaries; still, they did not adopt the religion of the "black robes," or, at most, a very few did. Originally the Cheroke...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1897

mmmmmmmmmmmm-mmmm BMUHIRMi rpTr v ""(TTJtfwTlfiy-r t TfFnrrT; v ?f rvpwr ww -r--Tivfjrw mnsnRn 90 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. massacred. Shortly after Fort London fell into the hands of a skirmishing party of Indians, and its inhabitants were either massacred or reduced to bondage. Several expeditions, sent by the colonial government, forced the hostile Indians to retire. In 17G1 General Grant completely routed them, but during the Revolutionary war, they again caused considerable trouble, so that "it was necessary for the govern ment to detail a large body of troops against them. At the close of these wars their beautiful country was wasted; their habitations destroyed, and vil lages depopulated. But despite these heavy losses the Cherokees derived immense advantages from the recent wars; one of which was their acquisi tion of civilized modos of agriculture from their slaves whom they forced to till and cultivate the ground, while they, themselves, stood by wondering at the many ingenious...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1897

inrnTllTTBlHlraWiBnirTrffffflllBBBIH . VfWWW'v THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 91 1 If It their own and wore publishing a weekly newspaper and numerous religious works. Within five years over half the Chorokees were able to road; eight churches and many schools had been erocted; while all were profiting of the arts and industries of civilized life. But now here comes a power that is bent solely on crushing the original and lawful inhabitants of American soil; a power that has always been en croaching and still continues to en croach upon the rights of the poor Indians, appears once more this time to deprive them of their country, nay, their very homes. It was the govern ment of the United States prompted and even impelled by the Georgian Congress that caused the Cherokee land to be seized and all its inhabitants to be removed by force beyond the Mississippi. In 1830 the Congress of Georgia passed a law depriving them of all privileges hitherto granted them. "Thus," says Drake, "was the axe not...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1897

1 "i f 92 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. of stock and 150,000 head of cattle. Their schools numbered 7S, attended by 1900 pupils. We quote the Indian report for 1S77: "The Cherokees are well advanced in civilization, and are an intelligent, temperate and industri ous people, who live by the honest fruits of their labor and seem ambitious to advance both as to the development of their lands and the conveniences of their homes. In their council may be found men of learning and ability; and it is doubtful if their rapid progress from a state of wild barbarism to that of civilization and enlightenment has any parallel in the history of the world. What required 500 years for the Britons to accomplish in this direc tion they have accomplished in 100 years." GOVERNMENT. Their Constitution was framed after that of the United States and by the same they are made subject to our gov ernment. Three departments compose the power of the nation, viz., legisla tive, executive and judicial, the expen ses of w...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1897

!JJiT,l,WflM J """WT'f THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 93 Chorokoo Public Schools, now num bering over a hundred, arb under the supervision of a school-board composed of three persons. There are, besides, many private schools conducted by re ligious sects. Religion has not been neglected by the Cherokees. Though not tho first in number of ministers and churches, still the Catholic Church is doing ex cellent service in the nation. She has several churches and thirteen stations. Public buildings of great value are not the least objects of boast to the young Cherokee of to-day. Tahlequah, the nation's capital, possesses a council house, national prison, asylums, semi naries, and other magnificent public institutions. Among the number of thriving business towns we might men tion, Vinitia, Tahlequah, Tulsa and Fort Gibson. As a rule the Chorokees are shrewd in all business concerns; they own very rich and productive farms and cultivate them extensively; numberless head of stock and cattle graze in ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1897

94 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. TlMz ,5 pgel ofjpUrgatory, HOW MANY SWEET REMINISCENCES THIS TITLE RECALLS TO A CHRISTIAN MIND. The Queen of Purgatory Hy Frederick William Fabor, D.D.. Oh, turn to Jesus, Mother! turn, And cull Ilini by His tenderest names; Pray for the Holy Souls that burn This hour amid the cleansing flames. Ah, they have fought a gallant fight; In death's cold arm they persevered ; And, after life's uncheery night, The harbor of their rest is neared. In pains beyond all earthly pains Fav'rites of Jesus, there they lie, Letting the fire wear out their stains, And worshiping God's purity. Spouses of Christ they are, for He Was wedded to them by His blood ; And angels o'er their destiny In wondering adoration brood. They are the children of thy tears ; Then hasten, Mother! to their aid ; In pity think each hour appears An age while glory is delayed ! See, how they bound amid their fires, While pain and love their spirits fill ; Then, with self-crucified desires, Utter sweet ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1897

"WM' T ISW"" " THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 95 n vf "ypy "7"f twww - ft end is furnished by the devotion to the souls in Purgatory. We shall for the present only mention a few virtues, that are cultivated and nourished by this devotion. The devotion to the poor souls quick ens our faith. It continually presents to our mind the great fact of eternity, and ever reminds us of death and of the next world. It is, so to 3peak, a continuous great mission that preaches the great eternal truths to us in a most impressive and effectual manner. Pre cisely because this monition of death is more indirect and gentle, its effect is deeper and more lasting. Thus this devotion is a mild and friendly, yot no less serious monitor of the End of Man. As the remembrance of the last things is a preventive of sin, the same may well be said of this devotion. This devotion moreover greatly furth ers the practice of charity. It proposes all the natural motives and inducements for the exercise of charity. Goodness and...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1897

"jt"1 - wm pymy ' 96 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. glorification of God. Indeed, every form of the love of God prospers through the practice of this devotion. Simultaneously with the love of God His holy fear is more deeply implanted into our souls bjr this devotion. Scarce any other article of our holy faith is so calculated to inspire us with a great fear of offending God, even by the least sin, as this article of Purgatory. Noth ing else reflects the sanctity and justice of God in so radiant and brilliant a light as does Purgatory. No one can familiarize himself with the thought of Purgatory and remain indifferent to sin. Another virtue in the retinue of this devotion is humility. Other good works, that we perform may often prove a dangerous temptation to pride. The missionary may be thus tempted by the success of his preaching, the con fessor by the great throng of penitents, the teacher by the number and attach ment of his pupils, the benevolent man by the gratitude of the poor, but the...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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