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Elephind.com contains 4,571 items from Ranche And Range, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 28 October 1897

Ranch and Range. Old Skries, Vol. 4, No. 21.1 New Series, Vol. 1, No. 30. f THE WAYS OF ONE COMHISSION HOUSE. We had something to say about the irresponsible character of the Washington Fruit & Produce Union, of Tacoma, re cently. A representative of this journal, while in Tacoma last Saturday, called at the place of business of the concern. He asked for the manager of the man who came forward. "He is out of town," was the reply. "Let me see the secretary, then." "He's out of town, too." "Well, this is rather strange. Who, then, is caring for the business of this great corporation, capitalized at $10, --000?" "Oh, I have been hired to take care of things while they are away. You see, they have had a sort of reorganization here. The former secretary and treasurer was a fellow by the name of William F. Ryder. He run through with the funds of the company, and got things in mighty bad shape. Well, they have got rid of him, and now A. S. Farquharson has taken his place. Together with...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 28 October 1897

2 MR. DENNY'S FRUIT TREES. The following article appeared in Saturday's issue of the Seattle Times regarding the manner of spraying and pruning of the orchard of a well-known citizen of the same city: Seattle, Oct. 18, 1897.—Editor The Times: Riding into the city on the cars last Saturday morning a very important county official called my attention to the above heading. You a few days ago, in your daily, published a challenge to the public offering 5 cents for every scale insect found on these trees. I was not only disgusted, but ashamed to think that such a diabolical work could be done to an orchard like that. Certainly, the stumps of the trees are there, but wiieie are the limbs? They are non est. No doubt there is enough lye, copperas and lime on those old stumps to kill five acres of insects. But the fact is that orchard is ruined forever. Any prac tical orchardist knows well enough that when you dispossess a fruit tree of nine-tenths of its limbs it at once throws all the natu...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 28 October 1897

REVIEW OF FRUIT PESTS. BY W. H. BROWN (i.'oniiiiue<l from the issue of October 14.) from its ravages. This little pest is unlike the codlin moth in another respect. The larva of the codlin moth chews its food much the same as some of the higher orders of animal life, while the other is a sap-sucker and saps the life out of the tree much the same as a mosquito extracts the Dlood from unfortunate humankind. It is hard to exterminate. The other confines its work to the tree, being somewhat subterranean in its nature. Even the roots are not exempt from the fact that they form colonies on tne roots, trunk and oranches and forms numerous knots, often from the size of a pea to that of a goose egg. In these knots they are found in untold thousands, many being hidden away in the crevices of the cancerous knots, many of which cannot be seen except by a powerful magnifying glass or reached by means of any medicine that may be applied as an extermi nator. There is also a cotton substance tha...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 28 October 1897

4 STRIPPINGS. By M. L. MaTTER.son The typesetter got Prof. Heacker in Maine. He belongs in Minnesota. It is well to wash the strainer after each pail of milk is strained. Just invert the strainer and dash a dipper of water through it. Every dairyman in the state should see to it that there is somebody to look up the fellows who are illlegally selling artificial butter, and see to it that all such partries are taken care of. Some time ago we advised stopping the churn when the butter is in small grains. Now comes the objection "that the butter runs away with the buttermilk." For a small sum you can buy a buttermilk strainer, which will prevent such a waste. The quality and quantity of food given the cow cuts quite a figure in the flavor of butter as well as the amount. We sincerely hope there will soon be a law to prevent branding stock. Ear labels or tags can be had very cheaply and they are better than the brand. Haven't we an officer in this state whose duty it is to look up the m...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 28 October 1897

BUZZINUS. BY MRS. CHAS. LCE. At the close of the honey season the queen will stop de positing eggs to a great extent, but a fresh quantity of brood will be kept up for some time. Beekeeping in Hawaii is confined to a narrow belt of land along the coast. Bees can be kept inland, or up in the moun tains, but the honey is dark and of poor quality. Doolittle says that a sugar syrup that will not granulate in the combs is made by using thirty pounds of sugar, five pounds of honey and fifty pounds of water. Of course this is to be fed in the fall. A splendid fuel for the smoker, especially at this time of the year, when the bees are apt to be cross, is old discarded cloths from the hives. They are smeared up with propolis and make a very pungent smoke, which the bees do not like. One of the advantages of having your queens clipped is that at swarming time the apiarist can go to his other work, leaving wife or child in charge. If a swarm issues they have only to cage the queen, note the hi...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 28 October 1897

6 BREEDINQ GOOD POULTRY. The following timely article is from the pen of a chicken fancier at Salem, Or., who has made the matter a close study. This supplements strongly the train of thought started in these columns a few weeks ago by William A. Conant on the value of good blood in live stock and followed up by S. M. Shipley, the Seattle breeder of egg machines, who ap plied the text to the poultry yard. Here is what the Salem man says: We are told by many of our farmer friends that it does not pay them to raise chickens. We admit this is true, but that part which we refer to as not paying in the poultry business is, poor poultry. When we say poor poultry we mean the mongrelized feathered tribe of this country; the chickens that go it on the farms like the wild boar on our mountains and foothills. Those that are not bred and cared for properly; those that are simply tolerated on the farm, a nuisance as it were, and simply kept on the frm because the "old woman" insists she must hav...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 28 October 1897

experienced in our markets, but it is tasted by the consumers to the tune of about 25 per cent of the whole poultry produc tion that reaches the market. Our cities is the dumping ground for this diseased and unwholesome poultry, made so by the dealings of the country merchants with their houses in that city. Country store trading of goods for diseased poultry has been in order for years among us. This has been brought about by the wholesale dealers accepting in payment for goods bought anything that has feathers, from their country debtors. The farmer gathers up quarterly, or oftener perhaps, the culls and diseased fowls from his flocks, takes them to the country store and .swaps them off for sugar, cof fee, tea and calico. The country merchant in turn pushes this off on his wholesale house to liquidate a portion of perhaps, a very bad debt. The wholesaler is indifferent, and pushes it off on the market for just what he can get. This is the market system of poultry in our leading ci...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 28 October 1897

s Ranch and Range. ISSUED EVERY THURSDAY. In the interests of the Farmers, Horticulturists and Stockmen of Wash ington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Utah and British Columbia. Official organ of the Northwest Fruit Growers' Association, embracing Washington, Oregon, Idaho and British Columbia. Subscription (In advance) ------ $1.00 per year MILLER FREEMAN - Editor Address all communications to 634-535 Pioneer block, Seattle, Wash. Branch office at North Yakiina, Wash. M. L. Matterson, North Yakima, writes: "My father will be here this month with his family and bring along more stock of good breeding. Also, my brother-in-law and his wife (my sister) and an uncle and iris family. So you see I am well pleased with the Yakima valley, or I should not have advised them to come." Mr. Matterson writes that he is planning to put his butter on the market as gilt-edge stock with a private trade mark. That is business. New light is thrown on the standing of the Washington Fruit & Produce Company,...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 28 October 1897

FARM WASTES. The unnecessary loss of time is a common farm waste and one which not infrequently is responsible for financial disas ter. Detestable as is the practice, there are various other and harder ways in which time may be wasted than by whit tling store boxes at the corner grocery or elsewhere. Some of the most abject farm drudges, and there are a few such, are among the greatest wasters of time—slaves to their work, because they never have it systematically planned before hand. When a task forces itself upon them they go at it rough and tumble; a natural and necessary result being a serious loss of time and labor. The pernicious habit of putting off loses much time to the average farmer. A friend put up a large rick of excellent hay. One day in passing he noticed one of the weights had become detached and the hay was being blown slightly by the wind. Five minutes time would have replaced the weight and made all snug, but he "hadn't time just then,' and it was left for a more ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 28 October 1897

10 SHEEP IN UMATILLA COUNTY. Among the prominent sheep men of Umatilla county, Ore gon, may be mentioned John L. Scales and Henry Scales, father and son. The latter gives his experience in dipping sheep, which we publish for the benefit of sheep men and at the same time will interest many others not familiar with the mode of procedure in such cases. They have recently dipped their sheep, two bands on Beaver creek, Union county, and one near Lehman Springs, 5,800 head in all. First of interest is the vat, 24 feet long and 5 feet deep, 2 feet wide at the top and 8 inches at the bottom. The sheep are compelled to pass through the vat and immersed or ducked completely beneath dip with which the vat is filled before they are allowed to come out. They are driven in at one end of the vat, eight or ten at a time, according to size. A gate in the center and another at the exit, prevent them from getting through before the men have had an opportunity of ducking them. Each sheep absorbs and ca...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 28 October 1897

.A-TTEITTIOIsr Wool Growers, Dealers f Owners of SHeep JaZE PHY PROMPT CHSH FOR SHESEjP PELTS and WOOL WOOL SACKS FURNISHED IF DESIRED SEATTLE WOOLEN MILL CO. - - Seattle, Wash. HOPS. Salem Statesman: There is absolutely nothing doing in local hop markets as there seems to be no offers from the Eastern firms. Where the growers were offered 12, 13 and 13 cents a few days ago for choice lots, it is doubtful that they could get even 10 cents at the present time. However, many of the growers are inclined to think the slump was occasioned by the buyers to force them to sell at prices lower than they at first demanded, and there will be a dullness to the market for a few weeks, no doubt. Yakima Republic says the top price for hops is 13V& cents. J. J. Metzler, representing Phil Neis & Co., reports that last week he purchased 600 bales of hops at 12, 13 and liy 2 cents in Chehalis district. Metzler hastens to add that the latter figure was for a specially choice lot on orders and b...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 28 October 1897

12 HALTER-BREAKING BRONCHOS "One of the great disadvantages in the sale of range horses during the time when horses were in such great demand by outfitters for the Klondike, was the fact that so few of them were broken to the halter," said O. H. Holcomb, the well known dealer, to a representative of this journal the other day. "Those eastern people coming in could see nothing attractive about a horse that they could not handle with the same easi as Mary did her little lamb. The suggestion made by the veterinarian of the state of Montana in this respect I think a good one. He calls the attention of ranchers to the fact and says that if they were broken to the halter while young their market value would be considerably enhanced and they could be delivered to the purchasers with relatively little trouble and without injury which is not always possible where they can only be taken wth the lariat and forced into submission by the most cruel measures. The suggestion haa a commercial as we...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 28 October 1897

SOW DESTROYING HER YOUNG. A correspondent asks if we can give any reason or explana tion why a sow will sometimes destroy and eat her young pigs. The Western Swineherd says there may be several different causes for this trouble. In some cases we have seen a sow evidently suffering from a form of hysteria, simi lar to what is known as puerperal mania in the medical pro fession, and in such cases the trouble has been very much ag gravated, generally, by injudicious handling. If a sow is inclined to be wild and nervous as the time of parturition approaches, the best plan is to leave her alone. Do not go into her pen at all; it will only aggravate her. Handle your sows as much as possible while young, and nine times out of ten you will have no trouble at farrowing time; but if you have, make it a rule not to interfere unless absolutely obliged to and on no account allow strangers to go near the pen. In other cases we have been satisfied that the sow was induced to eat her pigs by an unn...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 28 October 1897

14 SEED DISTRIBUTION. Under the practice inaugurated by the late Secretary of Agriculture, Mr. Morton, congressmen as well as their con stituents were required to take pot luck and accept such packages of seeds as the dealers and the secretary chose to furnish, without regard to their wishes. A man in Illinois wishing to experiment with some "rare and valuable" seed would call upon his congressman under the old regime and receive in response, after tedious delay, may be a package of turnip seed, may be radish, watermelon cabbage or cucumber seed or may be a bag of peas or beans, according to the smile of fortune, but in few cases did he obtain what he specified and in none were "rare and valuable" seed forthcoming. Secretary Wilson proposes to expend the available appropria tion in the purchase of many new varieties of seed and will devote at least four-fifths of the sum to the introduction of really rare and valuable seeds. He had planned to have the seeds all brought to Washington...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 28 October 1897

BOLLM WHIMT Richer than Klondike IF you could get it every year. Or 70 cent wheat, or 50 cent wheat every year, would make your hill ranch profitable. BUT you don't get either figure more than one year in five. NOW that your are 11 ahead of the game," ask your wife and children about securing a HOME and a FRUIT FARfI in Vineland, the new irrigated tract in Asotin County, Washington, opposite Lewiston, Idaho. Great success the first year with corn, berries, sweet potatoes, peanuts and all vegetables; orchards and vine yards are developing wonderfully on scores of fine two to ten acre places. Winter temperature twenty (20) degrees warmer than your hill ranch. Best of SCHOOLS. Regular church services. Easy payments for lands. Low taxes. Pure water at every door. Many families from the hill ranches are making homes in Vineland on account of the schools and pleasant winter climate while keeping and working the ranches. Others change entirely, pre ferring fruits and high-class vegetables ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 28 October 1897

i 6 808-SLEDS BUILT ESPECIALLY FOR THIS TRADE OF BEST EASTERN OAK SUITABLE FOR THE FARMER, LOGGER AND MINER i MITCHELL FARM AND SPRING WAGONS, BUGGIES AND CARTS Send for Catalogue and Price List MITCHELL LEWIS* STAYHt CO. 308-310 First Avenue South Seattle, Washington WILSON'S ♦ MODERN ♦ BUSINESS ♦ COLLEGE SEATTLE, WASHINGTON ~y \f*uft 4** \. Is but one of the departments of this school. • Q \ V .![ ~ aa /^\\ Here those of neglected education, or those V«^ Ak^\ £J\\\V 0 V W\4\\^\\ wishing to review common English branches are *& VVW^ VVVV VVW\VV/VW accommodated. We also have the following de- Bookkeeping, Shorthand and Typewriting, Penmanship and Drawing, Individual Desk b usi U Eess«^ ournose love for the work, aud a recognition of the demands of a business career, have developed here an up-to-date, practical busines?training school *our practical business men as teachers. Send for the Practical Fellow. Address: JUDSON P. WILSON, President. to secure HIGHEST CASH PRICES FORYOUR...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 28 October 1897

TflCOmfl BUSINESS COIiIiEGE 4 'i. School of J Shorthand and Normal Institute _i - Business Department. ■■</•'■' .;•';:.. ;, Normal Department. '";■■! .■. ■ ■ '-:■ ." Shorthand Department. : Unexcelled fine America. -■ The best > facilities. ; Thorough' course in S all branches required for Most rapid and legible system. Business practice from first day, ' Book-keeping, county and state certificates. Optional branches. *,' '* *'■*£k~4 r*i Transcribing, Manifolding, etc. Correspondence, Business Forms, ~ • f. '■"';'•• r-; *',*! " * - ~™Z~'-' V • • •'-''■ ■''""- .'/ ' •'■ ''a " ' ,' ' •■" ' - ■'** ':•' ' m\ SEND FOR CATALOGUE TO B. J. IT AIT. PRINCIPAL, TACOMA. WASH. JOHN B. HCEN — ~ -^ - - MANUFACTURER AND DEALER IN , i Butter, Eggs ayid Cheese Sole Agents for the State of Washington for Ashton's Dairy Salt. The best Salt for Butter. i . »• ■ ■'-.:,' ~ ■--~, --~ v" Ship your Eggs to us.V We pay Cash for Goods on Arrival. No Commission. ~. , 820 West Street, Seattle. :.^^,::.^:^....

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 28 October 1897

PRICE AND QUALITY" — Figure Largely when you are buying your FALL AND WINTER SUPPLY OF PROVISIONS. Our stock is . complete in infinite Variety and unexcelled in Quality. We sell everything in the GROCERY- LINE. WINSHIP BROS., Inc. 920-922 West Aye., Seattle, Wash. R. CAMPBELL Telephone Main 158 . J. A. CAMPBELL THE CAMPBELL CO. •••Brokers and Comtnision Mercliants... FRUITS, FARM PRODUCE, HAY, GRAIN, ETC. Consignments Solicited. 907 Western Avenue, SEATTLE, WASH. AMERICA'S GREATEST EGG MACHINE Of course it is the old reliable ...... "EMPIRE STRAIN" SINGLE COMB BROWN LEGHORNS ' Prize Winners at Seattle and Tacotna 1896 and 1897, under Felch and Butterfield. A number of extra fine \ - . , Youngsters for sale. Terms reasonable. S. M- SHIPLEY 434-435 Pioneer Building SEATTIiE, umSfl. SEATTLE SALE AND FEED STABLE J^ O. H. HOLCOMB & CO., PROPS. ~~ ♦— -* I fe y® x>j£Aivi£ii£St iiv horses ©v H| WESTER AYE. and SPIRING STREET Heavy Draft Horses a Specialty Horses Sold on Commission - ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 4 November 1897

Ranch and Range. Or,n Skriks, V 01.4. N0.22. 1 NkwSekiks, Vol. I.No. 31.f NORTHWEST FRUIT GROWERS' ASSOCIATION. The fifth annual convention of the Northwest Fruitgrow ers' Association is called to meet in Portland, Or., commenc ing Tuesday, January 11, and continuing for tnree days. This convention promises to be the most largely attended and the most productive of results of any in the history of the organization. New and important topics are to be taken up and discussed and the issues will be ably handled by the leading horticulturists of the Northwest. Every fruit-pro ducing district of importance will be represented by piogr:s sive, wide-awake delegates. The Northwest Fruitgrowers' Association is conducted along most practical lines. Its purpose is the co-operation of the horticulturists in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and British Columbia, for the promotion and stimulating of development THE TREES THAT PROF. BROWN PRUNED The above is a view of tli<- orchard of Geo. Bowman, at F...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 4 November 1897

2 FROM II to W Is Six Years KING COUNTY HORTICULTURISTS. On October 21 the fruitgrowers of King county held their monthly meeting in the chamber of commerce headquarters, Seattle. C. W. Proruty served as chairman. Prof. Brpwn gave an interesting lecture on fruit pests and explained their nature, habits of life, and methods of extermination. The wooly aphis he treated at length and reiterated the statement he has made in this paper regarding the fact that it is a pest that has spread very rapidly in the past few years. He told of his activity as fruit inspector and of the many difficulties he had to contend with in his work. He has so far con demned about 3,000 boxes of fruit coming in to the port of Seattle with pests. He exhibited specimens of codlin moth found in apples coming from an orchard within four miles of Seattle, and stated that it was conclusive evidence that this pest did flourish in Western Washington, and he cautioned all orchardists to be on their guard against it. H...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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