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Title: Seymour Express And Goulburn Valle... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 10,508 items from Seymour Express And Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook And Yea Advertiser, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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New Desert Bean. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 6 February 1914

New Desert Bean. professor R. W. Clothier, of the University of Arizona, has dliscovered a new ivariety of bean, well adapted for cultivationiun dry .olimaetes. Dur ga 1300 mile journey over-the deserts and mountains of Arirona, le visited the Papago Indians, and 'got from them sevcral hundred: browmish-yellow 4beans of an unknown variety. •-These he· planted on'.exRerhnentale plots at ·the Arizona" Experimental -Farm. for four yeairs before the-discovery wasannoun ced. It appdars that the new bean. which had been named the 'ttepary bean, is more -prolific, under dry con ditiois. than any other known variety. -It yields-between. 7001b and 8001b to the acre,iwith no -niore' wter than tbo scanty rainfall of Arizonagives. Under :the eaimo oonditioflB ordinary ·beaush yield T-a·y froorm- 66(b tlo to40b.k theD

One Couple, One Home [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 6 February 1914

One Couple, One Ho-le This is what my old school friend, •ilhent,,and I dreamed.(ays a writer t a' Londo'papilr)'when, beooming en 'gaged at about the name time, we plabed to" spend - at east the first year of our 'marriedhlife in oiu'houlse--' :TWe should share expenses, and thus save a little money. We could" afford to have a good-sized house; in a hlsasant suburb, while a a.ird amoking room for thle men. and a tennis court for oursolves. 'We would always help each otlher in the house-keeping troubles bound to afflict suoh inexperienced people as we were. Best of all, we would be a great deal together. I should explain that Millicont's hus band was on the Stock Exchango, while mine was a barrister, who had just got over the most critical first years and was beginning to find a small but steady practloe. But for the co-operative housekeeping plan, each couple would have to bgin mar ried life m-a.very small house or flat. What actually happened was very different from what we had dr...

From Workhouse to Wedlock [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 6 February 1914

:From Workhouse to Wedlock A wedding; the outcome of an old age pension romance took place recent i at. Braintree, Essex. 'The bride was Miss Susannah Olarke, aged 76,. who has been an inmate of the Braintree VWorkhouse for nearly 20 'years,. The bridegroom was Walter Townsend, agedl 77, who has lived for many years at Drury lane, Braintree, and has been a widower for two years. The bride applied to the : Braiitrte. Guardians for assistance in her com ing marriage, and said that bhe and her husband would-each receive the old age pension of, 5/ per Wreek. A guardian offei?ed the pair a cottage,- and otlier members of the board subscribed 5/ to buy her wedding ring, the maister eing ordered to provide the trousseau. On the occasion of the ceremony the verger of the high-steepled :parish ehuroh 'was visibly autonihed. '"JI've never seen so many ?ople at a Brain tree wedding before," he observed. Every pew was full, the aisli was lined, and through the lattioed windows, one saw the crow...

Garden Notes. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 6 February 1914

Garden Notes. Solmeutimes, when plants do not strike readily from cottings, and cannot bu prbopigated by imeans of suckers or graftt, reourse is .had to layering, In this ease, a sihoot of the parent planit is bent over and partly cut off with a sloping out, which is kept open by a bit of gravel, covered with soil, so that it will take root. The layer should be pegged down to keep it in place, and the soil firmly pressed rouid it. AAfter it has taken root the -shoot is cut be tween the roots end the priont plant, -and the young plant or layer is remor ed to its .detired position. Layers are made 'at different times of the yeair, either spring or autumn being the •better, and they should not be \movedl until they are. thoroughly established. Almost any plant, which has shoots which can be bent to tho ground cuan be made to strike from layers, but' the method is usually only adopted when it is not easy to obtain iplants in a more simple manner. The plot of ground is first surround ed ...

MARKETS. WHEAT AND OTHER PRODUCE. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 6 February 1914

MARIKETS.. WHEAT ANuD OTHER PRODUCE. Wheat-The marke ill town Ihas shown a little firmer tone, though tho position is somewhat irregular. Parcels are quoted at 3/65 to 3/6}, while busi-. ness has been done for February de livery at 3/7. Small lots on spot have been sold at 3/6 cx store, Farmers' lots are queoted on the basis- of 3/5I to 3/6. Flour.-Tho association price for lo cal consumptioni is £8/L10/ deliverled. - Bran and Pollard.-Tho assooiation price for bran is -4/10/ delivered, and that for pollard £4/15/. Barley.-The market is firm. The demannd is steady for good samplhs of: both English and Cape malting. P'rimo Cheovalier mnaltillg is quloted alt 3/6, and good at 3/3 to 3/4, with a modecrate turnover at 3/3. PrimoCaple multing has changed handls at 2/21, good being wolrth 2/2, and pearling 2/ to 2/1. Onts.--Business is quiet on tput. For forward delivory sellers predomiln ate. Supplies iare coming to hand fairly frecly. Good to prime Algerinn iilling are quoted at 1/) to ...

WOMEN'S INTERESTS [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 6 February 1914

WOMEN'S "INTERIESTS (By --'Ambrasine.") * A merican udcsslmakers, says tlhe Ncw York correspundnt' of the "Daily Tele: graph," .are devoting'some' attention to theo possibilities of pinm cloth, from: the Philippines,' as-' an artistic substitute for the diaphanous .gowns worn by American* women,.who .demand the very latest thing 'in dress fabrics. 'Samples arel Being shown here, and the stores are ordering considerable quantities for next season. Pina oloth is more diaphanous than the thinnest of ovileo, more pellucid than the most clinging crepo de Chine, and more transpareont than the thinnest of crepo meteor. It can be doubled several tlmeg .and still be transparent. In one layer it has no more thickness thaih cobweb, and gowns made of pina will be called cob "web gowns. It is called pine cloth because it is'made of half silk, and half pine apple'fibre. It comes in all col ors, and in stripes of al designs. 1 It can be bought at 'a shilling a yard in the Philippines, but w ill pr...

Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 6 February 1914

A _- PURE SPIRIT. A NEW SERIAL STORY - entitled "TERRIBLY TEMPTED," will be commenced in this paper NEXT WEEK. UMONE Y To LEND ON3 FR"SO FARMS DUNCAN &WEtLLERi :67 QUEEN ST 2. I,B9URN.~ MEN A"WOMENI! I Know the! Jpeclal diseases olmen and woen., whin 11elected orbad SIy treated deplete the Strength and Visor. and make lile unbearable. I trea eert disease to Cure.: Kill and erndiate evory Germ : Sootho and iteatlhe nerve cenares: Sutduo altn Infammation. and [ rloata a normal aaottltoa.. WeaK. Diseased or Discourtged Men ma ~Save the benerit ao my years oa experience ·REE, and may depend on the strtitest Confi dence and Priaecy. Call or Write. Medicin tet Pso Free. tpoced ..ueoey ins p'aait. tpetr. AIIeabet cDood. tte, at.r .iaorE .nceieee. D~··( 'IIICLI C t "I ab Rt~o 4 Ei-i WONDER KNIFE *ie (t 3e4 a Resg teab bh&PI Psah bled. al.aaj a..s me.e mrti a.r i, - y?,e.r . s il -h --------~ o I.. e-a . a e" c AT LAST! HIGH-ULASS WLEDISH SEPARA YlRS available at prici.s HITH...

The "Jacks" [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 6 February 1914

Thbe "Jacks" Mr. Joseph Clayton has written a remlarkable nemoir of "Father Stinton of St. Albans." Probably no Iman c definite, unco:unpromnismg views had so many friends irrespective of creed oa calling. There were the "Jacks," for In stance, who lromi the slums of Gray's Inn Lane, were persuaded to gadher in Stanton's -loon ait the clergy 'louse for several Sundays, and oi who.n lie used to speOak. They wouldn't ,?i e theil names. "We have all the same. namnLe-Jack: call u 'tllhe Jacks,' " -as their auswer to inquiries. "Wed, after they had been cominlg for a fairly hmng time, ad I had given the'n the best instruction I could," raid" Father Stanton, 'they turned up ?nue Sunday bringing a iarge- German litho graph, framed, of Ounrist blessing ilttle childlren. They sal.d, as I'd been -cry kind to them, and tried to do tlhe, good, would I accept this token ot their gratitude. Or course, I accept- - ed it, and then 'the Jacks' simply lls allpeared, land no one ever salw or hearl any...

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS. ABOUT PATENT LAW. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 6 February 1914

QUESTIONS AND * ANSWERS. ABOUT PATENT LAW. How loung, Mr. Turrri, does a pa tent last? "Under the Cmrmonriwealtlh Patents Act 1903. one pattcht covers tile -sv Australian States. and Papua anid can be granted for 141 years (sextensible rii der very exceptional circumstances), subject to a renewal fee of £5 at ihe end of 7 years. On .a fine being,;:a:d lateness up to one year in payng re newal fee is permissable. - When irs renewal fee payment is accepted, ove' - due, thie court can refuse damages for infringement committed after tihe rlve date. Application for provisional 1:(o tection is allowable, buit not eomrlni.y. Irs costs. through a Patent Attorn y, four .or five guineas; and runs aSc mouths, or ten if extended. Then tihe comrplete aplplication would be neces sary, or the patent application would cease to bIe in force." Is tire above words, Mr. G. G. Tuirri, thIe well known Melbouine Pa tent Attorney, gave some iriformnation; and as it was seen to be of geiAeral in terest, we ...

MISSING CONTINENTS. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 13 February 1914

MISSING CONTINENTS. It has long been one of the delightsr of ohilosophy and soience to spend their imagination on the construction of vanished continents, where either Euto pias flourished, or the conditions ob taining were suitable for the develop moent of "missing links" Thus on the one sidd of the world we have the hypothetical, but probable continent, sometimes called Lemuria, of which the Dutch East India Isles are all that remain, where the biologist and eth. nologist may sport with theories of the arrival and dispersal of man* and on the other side we have the Atlantis of the ancients-that--island to the west of the Strait of Gibralter, whioh legend has it, was, submerged b the gods, because of the impiety of its in habitants. But, although this At lantis is apocryphal, it has long been k'..wn that the west of Europe, Africa and the British Isles once extended far beyond their present -oast lines into the sea; and that at one time Great Britain and Ireland were but the out ly...

FEEDING DAIRY COWS. DRY WEATHER PROBLEMS [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 13 February 1914

FEEDING DAIRY COWS. DRY WEATHER PROBLEMS One of the most serious problems which the dairy-farmer has to face is providing feed for-dairy cattle 'during long spel? of dry weather. For the purpose of fe ding tairy cows, lu cerno far surpasses all other crops. The best land is a deep good loam. Lucernd is the most profitable' of all crops. Nor is it altogether depend ent upon moisture at or near the sur face. It sends its rdots far down into the soil and subsoil, and hence gets supplies--of water where many other crops would fail from drought. The soil must be -in good heart, be well oultivated, and when once established, it will yield crops for several years. The surface soil in whiclf the seed is placed, must-be fine, and manure ap plied liberally. It is much better to drill the seed at the rate of 18111 to. 201b to the aore. The soil must be rich in phosphates, and lime and potash A frequent manure applied is: 35 bush els of lime, 150 lbs of phosphate, 1001b sulphate of potash, and ...

FAITH HEALING AND CANCER. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 13 February 1914

SFAITH HEALING AND CANCER. Remarkable evidence, showing how a victim of oancer died in great agony while receiving Christian Scienco "treatment" from a woman who ad mitted tlhat she- was absolutely devoid of medical knowledge, was given at the Westminster's Coroner's Court at an inquest on Miss Eva Lucy Holden. Miss Hlden, who was 51 years old, had been a sufferer from cancer for sorm years, and had been told that an operation was necessary. She refused to have an operation, and about two years ago, she became a Christian scientist. Miss Alice Payne, a friend, describ ed how a Mrs Donaldson, a Christian Science practitioner, "treated" Miss Holden by prayer. Mrs Donaldson said that she first met 'Miss Holden two years and three month ago, when Miss Holden came to her and said that she: had read Chris tian Science books, and wanted to have Christian Science treatment. "Have you had any experience of mod:cine?" the coroner asked. "No, I hafe had no medical train . r." Mrs Donaldson rep...

A FUNERAL IN NAZARETH. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 13 February 1914

A FUNERAL IN NAZARETH. SEach religious community has a sep arate cemetery, and the Moslems have two. A death in the household is im mediately announced to the neighbor hood by the shrieks of the relatives who have been sitting around the deathbed. 'If a Moslem the dying man is turned so as to face Mecoa. N6 special riligious ceremony is per formed then; but if the last struggle seems to be prolonged the "khateeb," or priest, may be summoned to invoke Allah that the spirit may quickly leave the distressed body. It is believed to be the reward of a virtuous life to have a quick ending. The hands are lifted up at the very last, as a final adher enoe to the Moslem creed. The mo ment that the death occurs the women scream, tear their hair, and rend their clothes, especially the covering of their breasts, and-beat their chests. This frenzy brings all the neighbours, who crowd into the chamber of grief and idd their voices to the tumult. Such a scene may last an hour, but sooner or later o...

DISEASE AND PREVENTIVE MEDICINE. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 13 February 1914

DISEASE AND PREVENTIVE MEDICINE. The problem of the age, looked a. from the truly eugenic standloi:nt die not ?onsist; in breeding a r'acc fittd to inhabit a germ-laden world, to be c:aable of withstanding an utterlI vile and vicious environment, "ane then in producing the noblest ano ablest race. both physically and men tally to inhabit that purified envir. on'nent. It was because of our anti pluntted system of medical 'practice for pecuniary gain that physical de terioration existed. It was time that both the profession and the public should be c;sillusioned regardin? th the cures-for maladies. No disease iii time-honored heresy that diseAse could be eliminated by discovering all past history had been- inaterially lessened in its incidence by the dis coverv of a cure. It was organised preventive medicine that, by attack ing disease at its incidence and mrak ing an environment clean. had prac tically annihilated many diseases. Professor Beniamin Moore, at tvi 'fedieo-Legal Society....

POULTRY YARD. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 13 February 1914

POULTRY YARD. A careful poultry-keeper will go into the fowl-house now and then in the evening, to see the birds are allright, as their exact oondition can ba ohb served when on the, perch. Should any bird be breathing hard, a tea spoonful of warmed glycerine, follow ed by one of salad oil, should be given at once, as this treatment will ease in a short time; then give two roup pills, and on an average, fifteen birds. out of every twenty will be well in 'frofi three to seven days, if treated whlien the first symptoms appear. Should the rattling in the throat be very severe, and the breathing hard, the flesh over the lungs should be pain ted with tincture of arnica. For the mian who goes in solely for eggs, a forcing system of feeding is all right; butt it is bound. to be detri mental to breeding stock, and thins is why pullets, intended for breeding purposes, should not be given quanti ties of nourishing soft food. If they are, it almost certain that many of the eggs produced will b...

THE QUESTION FOR POULTRY KEEPERS. EGGS OR MEAT, OR BOTH. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 13 February 1914

THE QUESTION FOR POULTRY SKEEPERS. EGGS OR MEAT, OR. BOTH. Which pays best? To keep Leg horns and produce eggs only; to grow birds that furnish meat only; or to go in for a breed that will give a fair number of eggs, furnish sitters, and also provide a bird for the table. Tak ing the questions in order the answer to the first is that, so far the genera' impression is that eggs pay the best The not return per hen for the first year's lay is anything from 4/ to 8/ according to strain and management. The climate suits the Leghsiss, all the records in-laying - competitions have been made by the .breed, and the Poul. try Expert, who it is understood has advised several people in regard to their operations, . has recommended them to go in for Loghorns only. The reply to the second question is -that, upl to the present, no one seems to think that there is sufficient profit in breeding birds exclusively for the table. It is pretty certain that all that can be looked for is a net profit of f...

WHAT OUR FOREFATHERS ATE. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 13 February 1914

WHAT OUR FOREFATHERS ATE. A German paper publishes an inter esting article on the lost dishes of. the Middle Ages. ' It seems that. the art of 'cooking has 'declined, and that it is in part due to the changing'fashions in food. For instance, in Germany, in the middle Ages, many vegetables were eaten which have long since dis appeared from the table, such as vio let leaves, mixed' with young nettles, thistles and green wheat, and boiled hemp seeds. Salads were made 'of mallow leaves, celery roots, and purs lane, mixed with salt and pepper, for oil was almost unknown. Olive oil was considered to' smack of effiminaoy: and Italian luxury. Horse: radish sauce was used instead. The origin of sauerkraut is lost in antiquity. Bub it was certainly invented by the Ger man hausfrau long before cauliflowers or artichokes or potatoes were known. The potato rovolutionised the •fare of the poor, who had formerly to rely on .the roots of wild plants. The var iety of meats was larger, including beav...

FOOLISH. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 13 February 1914

FOOLISH. A?,man and a woman were walking along a country road on their way to call on a neighbor. Presently they heard. a sound back of them, and quick. ly stepped aside to. let a motor' car piiss; As- they--were gettiig- th -duso, out, of their throats and olothing, the woman said: -" -"Henry, -why don't you ride in a -thing like that instead of walking as you do?" ' ''Because, Mary," he replied, with no sign of slla?mo; "l haven'-money to pay the cost of it." "Why haven't you the money, Henry? she persisted.. "Because, Mary,' I have not been able to get it since I married you." : 'If there were any insinuistion in that .she inored iti. "Well, why didn't you get it before younmarried me?' -she asked. - ."Because Mar there were reasons." "Could yof 'ave got it?"- . - "I am quite sure. that 'I could have done so." "Then, in heaven's name,-Henry, why didn't you?" . "Because, Mary,.I preferred you, as poor as we both were, to a millionaire lady who wanted me in. spite of my poverty." S...

WOMEN'S INTERESTS [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 13 February 1914

WOMEN-'S INTERESTS (By "Ambrosine.") The skirt is going to hall-mark, the dress-is, in faoot, doing this now. I :can only offer one opinion: that. the spring-spread hip is going to be- con domned by all except extremists. Hav ing said that I glance at the blouse-I refer to the dominating note. In this department we have everything that is beautiful, and very littlo that calls for condemnation. The frill has grown like a flower--bud to bloom. Bit by bit the Medici has expanded till we are one reniove from an irregularly formed. ruff. The swelled front, which is outlined with a frill is to be exploited, frill to short sleeve in keeping, or to longer in the form of an hour-glass. The designers the other side of the world are nothing if not resourceful to names. The wrist-frill, which is drawn in at centro with' ribbon, is very aptly described. Buttons are an etcotra we shall see in less striking form. While plenty may be used, either i r use or decoration, they will be of much reduced ...

TURNING THE LAUGH. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 13 February 1914

TURNING THE LAUGH. When the slight of hand artist calls one of the audience to "aid" in a trick, he generally manages to "get the laugh" on this obliging person, but not always, as.the following plainly shows. The conjurer in the village school room had invited any g-ntleman from the audience to step up on the platform and a rustio in a velveteen ooat res ponded. "Now, Sir," said the professor, "1 iupposo you consider it a matter of im possibility for me to make that rabbit im the box pass into your coat-tail poc ret?" "I "dunno about impossible," came the reply, "but I wouldn't do it if I vias you sir." "Oh, you'll-be in no danger 1 can as iure you.. said the slight of hand man. sirils. "I worn't thinkin' about myself," the ustic answered. "I was studying the rabbit. I've got a couple of ferrets :i that there paocket."

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