ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, T... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 719 items from Australian Children's Newspaper, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
719 results
Dolls. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 27 July 1899

Dolls. OW, (lear girls, I hope you have all been very busy attending to dolly's wardrobe. You see it is very nice to be able sometimes to work and play at the same time. So that you can have the fun of dressing Dolly while learning to make her clothes. Do not be in a hurry or try to make them too quickly, all in one day for instance, but sew them licitly. Every little girl ought to be clever w ith her needle. I hope some of you will write and tell me how von get on with them. Last month we omitted Dolly's bonnet, but, of course, she must have one. At this time of year velveteen is warm and comfortable, but any bright, woollen material will do. Get a long piece of cloth, which, when it is folded, makes a square again ; or two square pieces will do. hay them together and shape them by my dotted lines. Sew the shaped parts together and gather them a little. Hem the fronts and lay abroad tape onthe in side above the curtain. You ran a string in there to gather it closely round her neck....

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FANCY WORK. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 27 July 1899

FANCY WORK. BY MUS. ERNEST FAVENC. I suggest this month that the younger needlewomen still continue the cross stitch. The design given here will do well to work across the front of bibs, or feeders. There is, I think, added plea sure in work that has an object, and most of you have small brothers and sisters who uso those Iii hs. I hope many will be industrious and make at least one. An initial might he added to the pattern, and you may find the initial you want if you look back to the fancy work page in the last number of this paper. The bibs may be made of any material ; but it is easier to "work cross-stitch if you have some coarse material that shows the threads plainly. Linen towel ling is an excellent thing for the purpose, it looks nice, and the threads are distinct. Red or blue ingrain cotton for the cross stitch. The shadow work that is illustrated needs more experi enced workers, but you will be surprised, when you have mastered the first few details, how exceedingly sim p...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Cycling. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 27 July 1899

Cycling. Two brothers, Frank and' Alexander White, started from the Melbourne Post Office on tlie 5th inst, on a ride round the Continent of Australia. The dis tance to be covered is estimated at about 15,000 miles. The undertaking is a big one, and the brothers will doubtless undergo many privations before the journey is accomplished. The Melbourne Bicycle Club recently celebrated its 21st anniversary, and the event was marked in a very praiseworthy manner by a donation of £100 to chari ties. Tlie "scorcher"' is becoming a great nuisance in the suburbs, and it is time that the authorities took a hand in the matter. When he desires to test his speed, the scorcher invariably takes to. the footpath, to the danger of children going to and from school.

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 27 July 1899

PPS'S Will make Youno; Australians Strong and Healthy COCOA

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CLASS C. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 27 July 1899

CLASS C. 1. Furnish an original puzzle (say a square word), and supply the answer to it. i2. A goose, a fox, and a bushel of corn are on one side of a river. The ferry boat can take over only one each time. For obvious reasons the fox and the goose cannot be left together, nor can the goose and the corn. How can they all betaken over ?

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 27 July 1899

I am glad to lind that a large number of new names will appear amongst my competitors thia half-year, The compe tition closes for this month to-day, and the results and answers will appear in our next number. 'Hie results of the first competition show that the following were prize winners : CLASS II. 1. Myrtle Turland, Burrowa-street, Young. 2. Jessie McMaster, Fairfield. 3. Hubert James, Hazeldean, Stockin bingal. 4. K. A. Willis, Public School, Fairfield 5. Winnie Gillroy, Edwin-street, Croy don.

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CLASS III. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 27 July 1899

CLASS III. 1. Mary Butt, Bongongolong, Gundaga1 2. Violet Pettengell, Public School Ben demeer. 3. Walter H. Scott, Chester-street, Moree. 4. Samuel M'Geoch, West Kilnyana, Mulwala. 5. Jean Thompson, Torsonce, North Sydney. CLASS IV. 1. Addie Lindsay, Darling Road, Rozelle. 2. Mabel M. Gordon, Gragin, Warialda. 3. Alice M. Macreath, 286 Jones Street, Pyrmont. 4. Myrtle Allen, Lake Cowal, Marsden. 5. Dorothy Cheater, Myra Vale.

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CLASS V. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 27 July 1899

CLASS V. 1. Alan S. Walker, Morven, Glebe Point. 2. Irene Bellamy, Superior Public School, Darling Road, Rozelle .3. Douglas Walker, Avenue Poad, (Hebe Point. 4. Stella C. Taylor, 22 Wellington St., Chippendale. 5. Roydon 0. Clack, 176 Underwood St., Paddington.

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 27 July 1899

Ask for EVANS' KNITTING COTTON In Balls. As above in Nos. 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20. STOCKED BY   David Jones & E Way.

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GEOGRAPHICAL FACTS & FANCIES [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 27 July 1899

I>y GEO. COLLINGRIDGE, Member of the Council of the Roya, Geographical Society of Australasia. [Our readers will be pleased to learn that we have arranged with Mr. George Collingridge, to furnish a series of articles on interesting geogra phical subjects. " Geographical Facts and Fancies " will be continued in our next issue, and followed by " Some Ancient Opinions on the Shape of the Earth. "] OUR great-grandfathers had a very amusing way of describing coun tries, and the}" often changed the names of places. Sailors especially used to give curious and funny names to prominent landmarks and seaport towns they visited, and some of those names have been retained to the present day. As an instance, I may mention : Leg horn as a changed form of Livorno, in Italy ; the Lizard instead of Laizart, on the most southern point of England ; the Horn instead of Cape Hoorn, the once dreaded cape south of Magellan Strait ; Arthur Seat, near Edinburgh, a corrup tion of Ard-na-said. Arthur Seat,...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"MAROONED" A ROMANCE OF UNKNOWN AUSTRALIA [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 27 July 1899

'^A ROOFED" ^ Pp/vyv-ICE. AV5TRALÍA^ have always been interested in the story of our early discoverers, but the material they left has been so scant that it is principally by deduction that anything like a clear idea of their doings can be obtained. They were probably men whom adverse winds had blown from their course-men who were more concerned in regaining known latitudes and safety than in piercing the veil of obscurity that wrapt the unexplored ends of the earth. But now and then they left their impressions on these barren shores, and a careful study of their remains enables the student to piece together something of their life and labours, and trace a knowledge of the Great South to a much earlier period than at first sight seems probable. A keel half buried in the sand, a length of rusty chain, or a letter rudely carved on a rock or tree bears silent witness to the presence of civilised man. A legend among the nomadic tribes that inhabit the central deserts, or the remains of ...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FOREIGN STAMPS. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 27 July 1899

FOREIGN STAMPS. I am not at all surprised to find that I have struck a chord which finds sympa thetic response from many readers. Boys, after all, do not change from one genera tion to another as much as we often sup pose. The boys of to-day find delight in the same hobbies and amusements as their fathers. They have new interests, of course, but the old ones remain, and many correspondents inform me that stamp-collecting is not the least engross ing of their occupations. Let me say, first of all, that I had no intention when I wrote ni}7 last article of acting as an agent for the purchase of stamps, or as a medium for arranging exchanges, but as so man}'correspondents ask me to do so, I can only say that if time and circumstances permit, I shall do what several of my country corres pendents ask me, i.e., act for them in th pinchase or exchange of stamps. For the information of correspondents (H.K.M.. P.W., K.J.C.. etc.,) I may explain that the X.S. Wales Consump tives Hospital stamp...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TO THE WORK ONCE MORE! [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 27 July 1899

TO THE WORK ONCE MORE ! OLIDA YS, like other good end sometime. So Midwinter vacation of 1899 is now a thing of the past, and most of our readers are now settling down to the long half-year's work. To many of you the new half year brings hope and joy. This is, in many cases, the time for promo tions. Some have taken a step upwards and got into a higher class; some - it may be-have gone up " on trial " (teachers used to do these things, and I suppose the prac tice still obtains), some have missed promotion this time, and are sadly contemplating another year's work in the old class, whilst some are only half-way through their present class and are looking forward to promo tion in the next half. To the fortunate boys and girls who have taken a step upwards, let us w ish success in their new sphere j Hard work and steady application in the new class, as in the old, will bring an adequate reward. Culti vate these virtues now, and you will surely lay the foundation of the quali ties which...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CHATTER PAGE EDITOR'S NOTE. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 27 July 1899

EDITOR'S NOTE. Our correspondence has been growing every month until with the last number it ran into nearly a thousand letters. Some of them need answers -some of them don't-and a great many of them are good enough to print for the kind w ¡shes and interesting matter that is contained in them. We want to encourage our little friends to send us short, chattj letters on matters of general interest. Every month we will print a page of the best, and at the end of the year give a prize for the best letter sent in. The points on which it will gain a place will be composition and subject, and " Ree Bowler's" letter is a fair model of the kind of letter we want. "Bee" doesn't say how old she is. and as age will be taken into considera tion, it will be as well for all our correspondents to say how old they are. Any letters not for publication should be headed PRIVATE : Dear Mr. Editor,-Would you kindly let me know in what papers the names of the winners of the prizes tur rhe word competitio...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Mademoiselle Nuage et Mademoiselle Rayon-de-Soleil. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 27 July 1899

Mademoiselle Nuage et Mademoiselle Rayon-de-Soleil. 1. Ma fenêtre donne sur un jardin, où deux fillettes jouent presque toute la journée. J'appelle l'une d'elles Mlle. Nuage et l'autre Mlle. Rayon-de-soleil. La première aime beaucoup à faire la moue et à tordre ainsi ses lèvres-. L'autre a toujours un sourire sur ses jolies lèvres, ce qui leur donne une gentille courbe comme ceci -. Pouvez-vous devenir l'air qu'elles ont ? 2. L'autre jour elles allèrent à travers les bois et les prés pour cueillir des fleurs sauvages ; et quand elles revinrent, elles rapportèrent des bouquets de violettes et dc marguerites, et des fougères vertesqui avaient déjà commencé a sc flétrir. Elles étaient très heureuses, mais cependant très fatiguées, avec leurs souliers crottés et leurs tabliers salis et déchirés. Rayon-de-soleil donna quelques-unes de ses plus jolies fleurs à sa maman «,; quelques-unes à sa sour. Mlle. Nuage dil qu'elle avait eu trop de peine à les cueillir poui- en donner -elle les voul...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE CHILDREN'S NEWSPAPER [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 27 July 1899

THE CHILDREN'S NEWSPAPER Is a news paper written express]}- for children. Its main purpose is to supply, ju palatable form, the world's news care fully selected and edited, told in simple language and accompanied by appropriate explanations and references suited foi children of both sexes. THE CHILDREN'S NEWSPAPER is calcu lated to keep boys and girls up-to-date in their knowledge of important current events -to keep them abreast of current literature-to provide them with enter taining and instructive reading which will enlarge their minds, widen their sympathies, and interest them in the affairs of the great world around. As time goes on new features will be introduced as oppor tunity offers, so that it shall embrace all matters which enter into the child's life. All political and religious matter will be excluded, so that parents and teachers of all classes and shades of opinion may place the CHILDREN'S NEWSPAPER in the hands of even the youngest child without misgiving-fully assu...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Empire Builders. No. 2.—SIR GEORGE GREY. II. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 27 July 1899

Empire Builders. - ^-. No. 2. SIR GEORGE di REY. II. r^REY forwarded to the British Government an account of his observations of the customs and habits of the aborigines, as he had known them on his exploring journeys und at King George's Sound. So valuable and ably written was this considered that copies of it were sent by the Secre tary of State to all the Colonial Governors. Soon after reaching England he was offered the position of Governor of South Australia. Accepting this, he arrived in Ade laide in May, 1841. At that time lie was the youngest Governor ever appointed to a British colony, being only 28 years old. Younger men have, in more recent times, bren selected as Colonial Governors; but the conditions are easier now, for experienced men usually occupy the position of responsible ministers, and direct the colony's policy. Grey came to a province which was suffering from the effects of mis management, and he had, almost single-handed, to produce order out of chaos. The col...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 27 July 1899

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. All letters to the Editor will bc replied to ax far as possible /aider this heading. WARATAH. - Your story of the Pied Piper of Hamelin is very well done for a girl of twelve. ïoutellthe story admir ably, and the dear old legend sounds as sweet as ever. But, Waratah, dear, your writing is not \\\) to the standard. You have crossed out so many words that the whole composition is ruined. Then you have written on both sides of the paper, a thing that should never be done for an editor. R.G. -The same idea has occurred to us and will be acted upon when space affords. N.M. F. -The editor will be glad to consider selected or original poetry, but in the former case the source must be acknowledged. H.B. -We fear 205 words will not win the prize ; at least it shouldn't. E.N. -Thanks for kind wishes. See JN.M F. J.W. -Jimmy, we are very glad to hear that you " live in a very rainy dis trict," also that you took a prize for writing ; also that you like our paper. Don...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
QUESTION COLUMN. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 27 July 1899

QUESTION COLUMN. Examination Questions will be given in each month's CHILDREN'S NEWSPAPER. Answers to these questions may be supplied by any children in the respective classes, and marks will be awarded each month for correct answers. At the end of each half - year-June and December valuable prizes will be given to the six pupils who attain the highest number of marks in each class. For each correct auswer to a question ten marks will be awarded. If only one correct auswer is sent in each month, it may win a prize. Ask your parents to certify on your answers that you are in the class in which you are competing. Do not forget to sign your name and write address on your answers. Anonymous answers canuot be credited with marks. Answers must reach me within thirty days of the publication of the questions but if you have them ready, I will be glad to have them sooner, so that I may not be rushed at the last moment. If your answers fill more than one page, place your name and address at t...

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Children's Newspaper — 28 August 1899

THE CHILDREN'S NEWSPAPER may be obtained from all booksellers and news- agents at ONE PENNY per month.

Publication Title: Australian Children's Newspaper, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
x
Loading...
x
x