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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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HEATED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

HEATED. "At this point," said the narrator, "she broke down and wept scalding tears." "Good gracious!" exclaimed the listener, "she must have been boiling over with rage."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
REMARKABLE DAM. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

REMARKABLE DAM. The Czar has just sanctioned a remarkable en-     gineering project—the raising of the water of the Sea of Azof 14ft. 8in., by building a dam near   Kertch nine miles long. In the wall immense   sea gates are to be made for the passage of ships,   There will also be outlets for the superfluous   water. The cost will be about £5,000,000, the in-   terest on which will be paid by ships trading to   the ports affected.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NEW CARTRIDGE BOX. TO SUPERSEDE POUCHES AND BANDOLIERS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

NEW CARTRIDGE BOX. TO SUPERSEDE POUCHES AND BANDOLIERS. Just now the ideas of the inventors of warlike   appliances turn not so much towards new wea-   pons as to various means for loading them or   enabling the soldier to carry ammunition where   he may get at it most readily.   Trial has been made at the Metropolitan Rifle     Range Company's ground at Runemede (says the   "Daily Mail") of a cartridge-container invented   by Mr. Patrick Dagnall, who enlisted in the     Royal Engineers 54 years ago, served in the   Crimea, and retired as a sergeant after 21 years   of service. His cartridge-container is designed   to increase the efficiency of men armed with the   most modern types of magazine rifles. It is in-   tended to supersede pouches and bandoliers, and   ce...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TWO ROYAL LIFE SAVERS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

TWO ROYAL LIFE SAVERS.   European despatches a month ago told, as a fine   sample of royal and feminine prowess, how Queen   Amelie of Portugal had risked her life to save a drowning boatman at Cascaes. The thing was,   no doubt, a novelty in its way to most newspaper   readers, but to the boatmen of Cascaes it was   only a repetition of local history.   Cascaes is the Court watering place of Portu-   gal, a few miles down the Tagus from Lisbon,   and the boatmen there preserve traditions of   many summer sojourns of Kings and Queens, of   Princes and Court functionaries. Among these   traditions is one that is now not yet a quarter of   a century old, and it tells how Maria Pia, now   Queen Dowager of Portugal, but then Queen Con-   sort of Dom Luis and immediate predecessor of &nbs...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHITE SLAVES. TERRIBLE CHARGES AGAINST A FRENCH INSTITUTION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

WHITE SLAVES. TERRIBLE CHARGES AGAINST A FRENCH INSTITUTION. During the past month a grave scandal has arisen about the Assistance Publique, the institu- tion by which orphans and abandoned infants are brought up at the charges of the Conseil General of the Seine. The "Morning Leader" states that at the last meeting of the council Dr. Cherot brought the most serious charges against this institution. The Assistance Publique owns 40 or 45 agencies in France under the orders of local officers, who, according to Dr. Cherot, simply let out the children to private persons and receive in return one-third of the money allowed for the chil- dren's maintenance, when, in return, they shut their eyes to the way in which the persons who have taken the children under their care starve their charges, and wring out to them the most that they can of the remaining two-thirds of the money paid by the central fund.   Worse, however, than this takes place. The   doctor went on ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE HIGHEST MOUNTAIN IN THE MALAY PENINSULA. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

THE HIGHEST MOUNTAIN     IN THE MALAY PENINSULA   Gunong Tahan, the hitherto inaccessible moun- tain of Pahang, has at last been ascended to the very top. This is no mean feat, considering that three successive expeditions to ascend the mountain failed within the last few years. Two of the explorers perished. Mr. Skeat, of the Cambridge expedition, could only climb up part of the mountain. Another scientist—Mr. John Waterstradt—has been more successful, and has just returned to Singapore after planting his foot on the top of the mountain. Gunong Tahan is the highest mountain in the   Malay Peninsula, with a height estimated from a distance at about 10,000ft. Mr. J. MacCarthy, of the Siam Survey Department, who viewed Gunong Tahan about 20 years ago from a high hill on the Perak side, set the height at 8000ft. His observation is borne out by Mr. Waterstradt, who is now in Singapore, and writes to the local press as follows:— "I thin...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A PIGEON THAT HAS FLOWN 1324 MILES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

A PIGEON THAT HAS FLOWN   1324 MILES.   A pigeon, owned by a famous American bird     fancier, Mr. R. E. Blaney, of Grafton, has just established a remarkable record for long-distance   flight. The bird in question flew nearly half   way across the American continent, from Den-   ver, Colorado, to his home in Grafton, Virginia.   This record-breaking flight was clear across the   Ohio, Mississippi, and Missouri valleys, and the   great plains of Colorado. The champion pigeon   which accomplished this feat rejoices in the   name of ''Denver," and is as pretty a specimen     of his tribe as could be imagined.    

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
In a Boer Concentration Camp. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

In a Boer Concentration Camp. This sketch speaks for itself. It illustrates one of the concentration camps in South Africa devoted to women. The larger tent is that of the Camp Commandant, who has been roused out at an unearthly hour by the women, who wish to lay before him grievances. The Commandant is having a bad ten minutes, and has not the pluck to show more than his face. This is said to be no uncommon occurrence in a concentration camp devoted to the women.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TWO DEATH SENTENCES. A JUDGE SAYS HE "NEVER TRIED A MORE BRUTAL MURDER." [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

TWO DEATH SENTENCES. JUDGE SAYS HE "NEVER TRIED     A MORE BRUTAL MURDER."   At the Northumberland Assizes, held in New- castle-on-Tyne on November 15, John Miller (67), dealer, and John Robert Miller (37), musician, his nephew, were charged with the wilful murder of Joseph Ferguson, a proprietor of roundabouts, at Cullercoats-by-the-Sea, on September 20 last.   The deceased was the second husband of the elder prisoner's mother. All the parties were connected with travelling shows. It was proved that the prisoners bought a sheath-knife at North Shields, and proceeded immediately to the   house of the deceased at Cullercoats. They were admitted by Ferguson. Mrs. Ferguson, who was upstairs, heard a     scuffle, and found her husband on the floor dead, with several wounds in his head and neck. Mrs. Ferguson said to the younger prisoner, "You have killed Ferguson," and he replied "Yes." Afterwards...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AT LIGHTNING SPEED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

AT LIGHTNING SPEED. One of the latest mechanical marvels is a wood-carving machine which turns out orna- mental mouldings at the rate of from 20 to 40 feet per minute. Any description of wood can   be worked. The machine, it is claimed, will do the work "of more than 2000 hand-carvers, and the mouldings are so perfectly finished by the machine that they do not require to be touched by hand."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DUTY AND DOSSER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

DUTY AND DOSSER.   A beery old boy from Balmain   Remarked in the following strain: "Them Govermint fellers Should furnish umbrellas Fer dossers in Sydney Domain. "I ain't, so to say it, objectin' To Barton and Co., but respectin' The tariff they're tryin' It's us as is lyin' Uncovered as wants their pertectin'." JIMMY.       In the chief room of every Japanese house   there is a slightly raised dais, which is arranged   so that it can be shut off from the rest of the   room. This is for the Emperor to sit upon should   he ever visit that home.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SECRET MARRIAGE ROMANCE. DIVORCE COURT SEQUEL TO A STRANGE WEDDED LIFE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

SECRET MARRIAGE ROMANCE.   DIVORCE COURT SEQUEL TO A STRANGE WEDDED LIFE. The story of a romantic secret marriage, after   which the contracting parties said good-bye at   the church door, was told to Sir Francis Jeune   in the London Divorce Court on November 18.   In the year 1894 Mr. W. R. J. Leeson was a   student at Kneller Hall, the institution at   Twickenham where army bandsmen are trained.   The commanding officer at the hall was then   Colonel Mears, whose daughters made the ac-   quaintance of Mr. Leeson.   One of them. Miss G. Mears, became secretly   engaged to him, and the same year they were   married at St. Mary's Church, Newington, with-   out the knowledge of her parents. As Mr. Lee-   son was training to become a military band-   master, and the rules of the s...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LITTLE ROOSEVELT AND THE ZEAL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

LITTLE ROOSEVELT AND THE ZEAL. Here is a good story of the new American President. When Mr. Roosevelt was a little boy, the sexton of a New York Presbyterian Church, finding him peeping in through the open door one morning, asked him if he would like to come in. Little Roosevelt, however, declined, and ran away. Presently, however, he was found again peeping in, and again bolted when invited to come in. This occurred several times during the morning, and when little Roosevelt got home he told his mother of the sexton's invitations and his own fear of going into the church. "But why didn't you go in, my dear?" she asked. "It is the House of God, but there is no harm in entering it quietly and looking about." The little fellow confessed that he was afraid to go in because the zeal might jump out at him from under a pew or somewhere. "The zeal? What is the zeal?" the mother inquired. "Why," explained Theodore, "I suppose it is some big animal like a dragon or an alligator. I heard the ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ELECTROCUTED. BUT STILL ALIVE. A PARIS DOCTOR'S STRANGE STORY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

ELECTROCUTED. BUT STILL ALIVE. A PARIS DOCTOR'S STRANGE STORY. To be shocked, apparently to death, by elec-   tricity, and then to recover and describe one's   sensations with scientific accuracy—such is the       incredible experience of Dr. Andre Broca, one     of the foremost physicians of France, a professor   in the Paris School of Medicine, and the author   of a number of books which are authorities   among scientists. Now that he is safely over his own electro-   cution, Dr. Broca has written for the New York     "Sunday World" the following account of his   amazing adventure:—   On the day in question we were making various   trials in regard to currents of high frequency.   My mind became absorbed, and I inadvertently   seized two electrodes in...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
YOUR EYES. WHICH ARE THEY? [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

YOUR EYES.     WHICH ARE THEY?   There are two classes of human eyes, says Pro- fessor J. M. Simon, the eminent oculist. First, the cold and indifferent eye, which falls upon you with the same interest that it would fall upon some large building or anything else. Then there is the warm, flattering eye, that indicates human interest. The grey is the strong one. I have observed in the majority of cases of people who have risen to eminence that the eye has been grey, although I am inclined to believe that the grey eye is weaker than any other. A grey eye can charm, and in every instance I give a man with that color of eye more consideration than if his eyes are of another color. The eye is the greatest aid to members of my profession, merely because through it concentra- tion of attention can be brought about, and that is what must be obtained in order to induce con- fidence. A person possessing a bright eye has naturally a larger power of possibl...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A MYSTERY OF THE ANTARCTIC REGIONS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

A MYSTERY OF THE ANTARCTIC REGIONS. —♦— A writer in "Knowledge," on a voyage from New Zealand to Cape Horn, describes the ap- pearance of a terrible fleet of icebergs. "We awoke to find ourselves surrounded by seventeen icebergs, the number increasing throughout the day, until at one moment I myself counted thirty two altogether, and there were floes of ice all about us. "On one occasion, during that first night, as we were slowly coasting round a monster of about three miles long, the captain suddenly discovered that it was joined under the water to a berg on our other side. "A great block had probably fallen away. It was just towards dawn, and the light was so extremely bad that it was just a mere chance that the rippling of water over the covered ice showed our danger. To have continued would have meant certain disaster. "The starboard engine was at once reversed, so that the ship might turn more quickly than she could have answered to the rudder, and we round- ed our adversary o...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
VOICE PHOTOGRAPHY PARTIES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

VOICE PHOTOGRAPHY PARTIES. "Voice Photography Parties" are the latest things in the fashionable world. The guests each speak a few words into a graphophone cylinder and as the sentences are given back by the in- strument, all present guess whose voice is being reproduced. The hostess has not to rack her brains in order to provide entertainment for her guests if there's a graphophone on the scene. There is nothing to compare with the grapho- phone as an entertainer, especially in the home. It turns the children's fretting and crying to laughter, and fascinates and astonishes the "grown-ups" as nothing else can. With a good instrument records can be made on the grapho- phone as well as reproductions of them.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HIGHLY SUCCESSFUL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

HIGHLY SUCCESSFUL.   "Did Hunter have any success on his Arctic   expedition?"   Oh, yes! He succeeded in getting back."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A SLUMP IN ORANGE BLOSSOMS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

A SLUMP IN ORANGE BLOSSOMS. Orange blossoms appear to be declining in favor with English brides. Formerly the flower was deemed an essential part of the bridal toilet, and none but widows went to the altar without wearing it. Even when a bride was married in her travelling costume, she pinned a sprig of orange blossom in the bodice of her gown. Judging by the fashionable weddings of the past few months, however, a new order of things has been introduced. One distinguished bride went to the altar with a wreath of myrtle, another with white heather and myrtle, another with white clematis, and yet another with lily-of-the valley. The reason given for putting aside orange blossoms is that as natural flowers were usually worn, the heavy perfume caused faintness to many ladies. As the artificial flowers so nearly resemble the genuine article, this can scarcely be said to account for the "slump" in the nuptial flower. Love of change and a commendable wish to bring a touch of originality in...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
RIDING A TURTLE. A DE BOUGEMONT STORY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

RIDING A TURTLE. A DE ROUGEMONT STORY. The cowboy who boasts that he can "ride any thing that goes on four legs" might be led to estimate his abilities more modestly if he could have the experience which came to Prof. Charles F. Holder, the naturalist, on the coast of Florida. After the ordinary diversion of turtle-catching, he decided to try a turtle on the open reef, and with this object in view had his boatman row him over to a lagoon, where green turtles feed, and can sometimes be seen asleep on the white sandy bottom, in 10ft. of water. Slowly the boatman sculled the dingey along until just ahead the black form of a sea-turtle was seen. Slowly and carefully we approached until I could see which way the head was lying. Fortunately it was away from me, and, slipping over, I swam down to the bottom, then along until I could reach out and grab the animal over the neck; and then the unexpected happened. This was a wild and untamed creature. Never had the hand of man touched it, and ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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