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Elephind.com contains 12,833 items from Waynesburg Messenger, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

_ BOOKS, &c. LEWIS DAY\ ~ ¦ J'*?'""'*'-''"!<l and Miscellaneous Books. Station-__-'-,.' 7: 'Ka7-'n " a-"1 Papers, Wilson's Old Buildtug. Mam siren. e„„, ,, ,_.,_,..

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

SADDX.BS AVS HARNESS SAMUEL M'ALLISTER Saddle, Harness and Trunk Maker, Main street three doors west of ike Adams House Sept. 11. 1861—ly.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

TOBAOOOHTSTS HOO"E* & WAGER , Manufacture and wMcula ud retail dealers in * ___._ S_f*____8 5?*-a «f»r Cas«s, Pipes, etc., Wtow .j a4fB - iWtaf, Nalunreet.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
__teat from Grafton. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

__teat from Grafton. GRAFTON, Sept. 25.—Five hundred of the 4th Ohio, with one p iece of artillery and Riugcrold Cavalry. 75 in number, under Col. Cautwell, and 400 of the 8th Ohio, under Colonel Harke made an advance from New Creek on Monday towardsIioiuney, driving the enemy, 700 strong, out of Mechanicsville Gap on the morning of the 24th, and advancing on Romney, stormed the town, causing the enemy, whose force nunfbered 1400 infantry and cavalry to retreat to the mountains, with a loss of about thirty-fiv« killed and a large number wounded. Oar IOSB was three- kilted and ten wounded.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
From Lexington. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

From Lexington. CHICAGO, fcJept. 25.—A Special dispatch to the Tribune by Telegraph. j says that Gen. Siegel. with a large force, and also Gens. Lane and Hunter, had arrived at Lexington and attacked Price. An officer in tho emp loy of the Government heard heavy firing while passing Hamilton yesterday and says that it was believed that Siegel had Price in the same position that Mulligan had been placed. In regard to Gen. Hunter this cannot be true, as he was at Holla, two hundred and fifty miles from Lexing-I ton on Saturday. DKSERTKR CvuttiiT.—The A\ heeling Intelligencer says: A company of the Corwin boys, of Ohio, are stationed at Webster. One of the boys of the company deserted shortly after the regiment reached Grafton. _J day or two ago they caught him in the vicinity of Webster , where he had domiciled himself, having married a respectable farmer's daughter, ten days after his'desertion: He was sent forward to be court-martialed, leaving his wife in tears. FRANCE.—A...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
England and the War. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

England and the War. The well informed London correspondent if the New York Commercial, writes as follows under date of the 6th instant:— '•Of one thing you may be certain name.3-, that all the reports and assertions put forth in either Nothern or Southern journals, about any intention on the part of England to break the blockade or recognize the Southern confederacy in order to get the cotton crop, are sheer nonsense.— The unanimous desire, both of our people and Government, to maintain a strict neutrality, so far from being diminished, is if possible, stronger than ever , and any recognition of the Confederates until they had established their independence in a manner that would put all further efforts on the part of the North out of the question , would be universally regarded as a breach of that neutrality. For the national honor, and for the sake of commercial precedent, our government will doubtless be watchful to protest against action at variance with international and...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
The Moral Courage of Gen Lyon. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

The Moral Courage of Gen Lyon. In tribute to the memory of Gen. Lyon is the following passage: He possessed great moral courage. Notwithstading his personal bravery and his military education, he was conscientiousl y opposed to duelling, and no ' provocation could ever drive him into a recognition of the code. On one occasion he was even struck in the face ; of course it then required much more courage to refrain from challenging his adversary than to fight him; but he adhered inflexibly to his convictions. For a time tnis subjected him to missaprehension, and even to contempt, among military men ; but, long before his death, his fellow officers understood and respected his position upon that subject. ¦ —.—*»^^ . ORDINARY DUTIES.—We are apt to mistake our vocation in looking out of the way for occasions to exercise great and rare virtues, and by stepping over the ordinary ones, which lie directly in the road before us.— When we read, we fancy we could be martyrs, and when we c...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
fram ©omspitOTts [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

fram ©omspitOTts For the Messenger. -AMP W .SHIN-GTON' , ( .Sept. 10, 1861. } Editors Mcs!<< nycr:—Once more 1 lind myself seated to pen a few lines for your columns. No event of great importance has transpired, so far as the Ringgold Cavalry is concerned, since my last, except the receiving of our Sabres and Belts which make us feci the more like soldiers, though I must confess that the way in which the boys handle them shows but little proficiency in irtilitary training; a visible improvement is however already perceptible and as as nearly every one is anxious to excel, it will not be till the Greene County Boys will hear a favorable comparison with any Company in the Regiment. In the absence of Capt. J. M. Harper, who has returned to Greene to purchase horses for the Regiment, we are drilled by Capt. Higgins of Company II., a man who is truly a gentleman in deportment and a finely drilled otticcr.— We still remain where my last left us, some three miles north ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Pittsburgh Boys aud Rebel Pickets. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

Pittsburgh Boys aud Rebel Pickets. A curious item of history was made by the Eighth regiment of Pennsylvania Reserves, one day last week, while on picket duty at Great Falls. The rebel pickets came on to the edge of the river and invited ours to spend a social half hour.— The invitation was accepted, and during, the remainder of the day over a hundred of our men crossed over, and about forty of the rebels returned the compliment.— Some very amusing stories of the day's proceedings are told. Among the rebel visitors to our camp were two captains and several lieutenants, who, upon leaving in the evening, cut off the buttons from their coats and presented them to our men as mementos of their visit. They ate and drank together, and as the story goes "had a good time generally." Nearly all of these rebels were badly oil' for shoes, and their uniform, which was poor, was made of '-nigger cloth." They stated that they had no heart in this struggle, but they supposed it must be foug...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
I The Banksland the Federal Loau. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

I The Banksland the Federal Loau. i The bank committees of New York, I Philadelphia, and Boston were iu session I in New York on Friday in conference with ! the Secretary of the Treasury, respecting ¦ the xeoond $50,000,000 of the federal loan. i The Philadelphia Iruiuirer of Saturday ; says: j "The nineteen banks of the city have agreed with great iinuoimity, to take their proportion of the second instalment of the fifty million government loan. Meetings of the directors of many of the institutions were held yesterday."

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
' The Potomac. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

' The Potomac. The rebels have fulfilled one of their threats at least. They have declared their intention to obstruct the passage of the Potomac river, and have diligently erected batteries and cleared the woods from the Virginia shore, so as to command a full sweep of that stream. I So effectively have their measures besn | taken that vessels can no longer pass up or j down without undergoing a destrutive fire, ; and the navigation of the Potomac is now | actually closed. The stoppage, however, ! will probably be but a temporary inconvenience, for the government will doubtless take immediate measures for reotiening navigation.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
ROLL OF HONOR [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

ROLL OF HONOR Receipt, on Subscription -luce Angati aotfc. Ain't. No. Vol. Mark Gordon, $3 00 52 3 Col. N. S. Ritchie, 4 50 52 3 Thomas Patteraon, 1 50 S2 3 -as. Bradford, T5 37 3 R. lams, 2 00 29 2 James Fonner, Esq., 1 50 52 3 A. J. Scott, 1 50 11 4 Sol. Hoge, I 50 52 1 A. F. Randolph, 1 50 52 3 James Patterson, 1 50 52 3 Mr. _. Patterson, 1 50 52 3 John D. Wood, 1 50 12 4 John Hughes, l 50 13 4 W. J. Bryan, 1 50 W. J. Cosgray, 1 50 7 4 Justus Garrard, 4 50 52 3 John Hoge, 1 50 52 3 VV. ti. Batson, 1 50 4 4 Samuel Smith, 3 00 52 2 Stockton Smi'h, 1 50 33 3 Phil. Kussart, 1 50 15 4 Geo. Graham, 1 50 52 3 Geo. Kent, 1 50 15 4 Isaac McCullough, 1 50 52 3 .Sol. Eagan, 3 50 .2 2 John H. Smith, 1 50 42 3 Thos. McUlelland, 37 28 3 Westley McClure, 4 50 52 3 Abner Thorp, 1 50 52 3 Bice Phillips, 75 33 3 Amos Smith. 1 75 19 3 J. II. Moredock, 2 00 52 2 Win. Stoekdnle, 1 50 52 3 Cazel Gordon, 1 50 52 3 Eltas Scott, 3 00 52 t Win. Loiifrliman, 1 50 52 3 Thomas Ross, ' 1 50 52 3 John A....

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
r r1lf '.u.m..kjn _"'.^"i" Depths of Mines. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

r r1lf '.u.m..kjn _"'.^"i" Depths of Mines. THE WORKHJO OF TflK ENGLISH MIMES " ••__ *'_ * An English jouraq., J*MS§ ? . |uin € the total product of wie -iups if Great Britain at £41,491,102 |lr a*- num, and computing that ]$D|j_-n(Jf supply of coal wfll last at least sevift hundred years longer, at present rates of consumption, gives the following account of the depth to which the bowela ofthe earth have been p ierced in England: , , **!$lie depth to which -we mine for eb*L-'is already great- The pit at Duckenfleld , in Cheshire, is 2,004 feet _H__e-r *fe_ snrfkee to the point where it intersects the 'Black Mine Coal ,' a seam urtlch is four feet six inches thick, and of the best quality for doiuu-*i8'gad lntamfactoring purposes; from this point a further depth of five hundred feet has been attained by me»na of an engine-plane in the bed «f the coal, so that a great portion of the coal is now raised from the enormous depth of 2,504 feet. At Pendleton, near Manchester, coal is...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Pereonal. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

Pereonal. Col. James A. Mulligan was born in Utica, N. Y., in the year 1829, and is consequently in his thirty-second year. His parents were natives of Ireland. His mother, after the death of his father, which took place when he was a child, removed to Chicago, where she has resided with her son for the past twonty-three- j^ars.— She married a respectably Irish American in Chicago, named Michael Lantry. He was educated at at the Catholic college of North Chicago, under the superintendence of the Rev. Mr. Kinsellar, now of 2few York city. He is a strict member of the Catholic church. In 1852, 1853, and 1854, he read law in the office of the IJxmorable Isaac _ * _ . Arnold, congressmen from the Chicago district. For a, short time he edited the' Western Tablet, a semi-religious weekl y paper, in Chicago. In 1856 he was admitted as an attorney at law in Chicago. At this time he held the position of second lieutenant in the Chicago Shield Guards one of the companies attached to t...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Affaire in Kentucky. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

Affaire in Kentucky. LOUISVILI -E , Sept. 30.—The Journal has reliable evidence that Gen. Zollicoffer has taken Manchester, Clay. county, with great destruction of. property. j Judge Ventres, of Hardin county, was arrested and committed on Saturday, for aiding rebellion. I ! There is a doubtful rumor that 600 , Confederates had an engagement j with five hundred troops of the Tenth Indiana, half way between Bards-! town and Bloomfield- Result not ! stated. . ¦ •^. .<* ..... Z^^ ' The Confikterate forces under -Humphrey Jkfcirshall have disbanded and gone home.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
From Washington City. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

From Washington City. [ WASHINGTON CITY , September 30.— | An officer who witnessed the disaster on Sunday morning attending the advance of our troops towards Fall's Church, states that Barr's battery of Campbell's Pennsylvania artillery was immediately in the rear of Mott's battery when the firingfirstcommenced. The balls coming from the declivity of a hill, dense woods being, on each side ofthe road, they failed in their purpose, and these batteries escaped injury. About half an hour afterward , another panic happening, Barr's battery were ordered to fire on . their rear. They had already loaded their artillery, but being aware that their friends were in that position, : refused to fire. Had they thought-. lessly obeyed the order the havoc would have been frightful. There is ' still a mystery concerning the first firing on the advancingcolumn , many believing that it came from a bod y of ! rebel cavalry.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Ifeta jtf \)t §ag. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

Ifeta jtf \\)t §ag. The Impending Battle at Lexington. JEFFERSON CITY , September 30.— Special despatches to the St. Louis Republican state there is no inteligence of importance from Booncville, Georgetown, Sadalia or Glasgow, and no apprehensions are felt of any immediate attack of any of those points by the rebels. All reports received from Lexington corroborate the opinion already expressed that the rebels intend to keep their main force there; but it is stated that several bodies, from 200 to 2,000 in number, have left there within a few days past for the north and west, but for what purpose is unknown. Gen. Fremont preserves a strict silence, but he is said to be actively engaged in ascertaining the exact nuinbei;. . of troops he can command, and organizing plans for the approaching engagement, for the success or failure of which he is to tost his reputation npon and win or lose his all. Every day an increased interest is felt in tho approaching battle, for it is genera...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
The Approaching Battle between Fremont and _ ¦ ___„. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

The Approaching Battle between Fremont and _ ¦ ___„. CHICAGO , Sept. 20.—There is much speculation here concerning tho strength of the two armies about to meet at Lexington. It may be interesting to state that letters received here from Huntsville, Mo., dated the 27th, express the confident opinion that Fremont will be beaten Unless he can bring 50, 000 men against Price. The. writer says the country is filled with armed men, marching to reinforce Price. He is satisfied Mulligan's surrender added 25, 000 to Price's strength. Everything is reported quiet on the Hanibal and St. Joseph Railroad.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Fortress Monroe Items. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

Fortress Monroe Items. FORTRESS MONROE , September 30.— Two members of the naval brigade were killed last night, one by drowning and one by falling from a tree while on picket duty. The rebels last night fired on our p icket guard at Hampton Bridge, severely wounding one man. The steamer Young American has brought in two prizes from Aceomac county. A fleet of thirteen schooners sailed to-day forllatteras Inlet.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
The Ketreat of the Rebels, [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 9 October 1861

The Ketreat of the Rebels, The cause of the retreat of the rebels, says a letter to the N. Y. "Post," is still a mystery. By some it is supposed that they have a large force above at Leesburg and another below at the mouth of the Occoquan. A Virginian who spent several hours with General Scott and President Lincoln says that the rebels are constructing rafts " at Aquia Creek and in several small creeks emptying into the Potomac above that place. If this he true, the rebels have fully abandoned their purpose of crossing below into Maryland. Our river flotilla is ready for them, and it is understood that several thousand of our troops and a number ofversels have went down—for what purpose remains to be seen. It is not improbable that ihe movement has some connection with the report that the main body of the rebel army rests upon theriver, with one of his wings some thirty miles below Washington.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
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