ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Indian Advocate, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
4,460 results
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1897

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 57 ZSp REV. D. CONSTANTINE, O.S.B. kfa'a&r' Rcv. D. Constantino, the subject of this sketch, was born June 4, 1857, at Aix, in Provence, France. At a tender age a pious mother o fibred him, under the patronage of the Blessed Virgin, to the service of Cod. The sacrifice was acceptable in the sight of the Lord, and accordingly, early in life we find the young Optatus enrolled among those cherished children of the Church, the humble followers of St. Benedict, at I'ierro-qui-VireJ When the religious societies were suppressed in Franco, the future Father Constantino with others priests and religious of his com munity, sought and found among the sim ple, warm -hearted Trish a return of the favors which, in days gone by, his forefathers and fel low - countrymen had bestowed on the perse cuted Irish, namely: a most cordial reception, which, no doubt, was expressed in many a "caed mille failthe" to the good French sog garths and religious. But Leopardstown,near Dubli...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1897

58 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. on his regular visitation to the distant and scattered members of his flock. Some of that indomitable will, which is ever ready to suffer all things in the service of the Master, he has undoubt edly infused into these poor but well disposed people. The building up of the temple of God within us is necessarily accom panied with material progress, and herein also Father Constantine's efforts have been crowned with success. At present there is in course of construc tion, and nearly completed, a beautiful log church at Oberlin, Pottawatomie Co. When we consider the poverty of our people, the extent, and sparsely settled condition of this mission, we have just reason to be proud of the work accom plished by our beloved pastor. We are grateful to God, who gave the material and spiritual increase, and can not re frain from expressing the hope that many others may come in the near fu ture to enjoy those blessings which are ours in this beautiful and fertile region, u...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1897

i fr-if ,.rm'!)rwjFv!'t t wr1' t " , '! y p't v THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 59 or bonenth the ceiling of Loretto's sanctuary, I bend my ear and listen, and sweetly come the words to me. Dio tc salve, Maria, tu sci benedctta, and list, across the blue waters of that purest of seas, comes in another tongue the same sweet melody. From Zara goza's wealthy shrine or the venerable sanctuary of Montserrat I hear it in that sweet yet strong Castilian: Dios tc salve, Maria, bendicta hi, eres! 0, how it takes me back to a distant past! When all was darkness in the West, and the dark ocean was a sea of terror, a mariner bold dared brave the fury of those unknown billows, and from the deck of the Santa Maria, arose at eventide the self-same prayer: "Thou art blessed," sang the seamen, and the evening breezes whistled through the shrouds, " Thou art blessed," and the rolling wave caught the refrain, and the stars looked down admiringly, and all creation sang: "Thou art blessed." I hear that prayer my m...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1897

60. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. iA Pair of Shoes.M How much a man is like his shoes! For instance, both a sole may lose; Both have been tanned, both are made tight By cobblers ; both get left and right. Both need a mate to be complete, And both are made to go on feet. They both need heeling, oft are sold, And both in time will turn to mould With shoes the last is first; with men The first shall be the last, and when The shoes wear out they're mended new; When men wear out they're men-dead, too! They are both trod upon, and both Will trod on others, nothing loth ; Both have their ties, and both incline, When polished, in the world to shine; And both peg out. Now, would you choose To be a man or be his shoes? Written for tlio Advocate. Early French Missionaries in America. Hy I). CAROLUS. Among the various nations of Europe which made attempts to discover, civil ize, and Christianize the New World, France undoubtedly kept pace with oth ers, if, indeed, she did not surpass them all. Her intre...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1897

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 61 followers chanting tho hymn, Vcxilla Regis, and concluding the ceremony with a solemn Tc Deum. This great man, who personified in his life the true expression of an ac complished knight, achieved what Fr. Marquette had so fairly begun. Amer ica owes him an enduring memory, for in him she sees the heroic pioneer who guided her to the possession of her rich est heritage. Another name of which every Cana dian may well be proud is that of De Maisonneuve. To this intrepid Catho lic pioneer is due the foundation of Montreal, the present commercial me tropolis of Canada. To the valor of a soldier he joined the fervent zeal of a missionary. He had the spirit of a Godfrey de Bouillon, and his name will bo forever famous in the annals of American history. Hitherto we reviewed the brilliant achievements of a few leaders, true heroes of this New World. Many oth ers followed in their footsteps, exhibit ing almost the same onergy and cour age. Let us now, however, turn to ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1897

62 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. at the same time cruelly taunting him. The next day an Indian tomahawk ended his long and painful martyr dom. Next to Father Isaac Jogues is Father Daniel, also a member of the Society of Jesus, missionary of the Hurons, and likewise destined for the same fate. Ho had already spent three years among the Hurons when, on the 4th of July, 1648, a band of Iroquois suddenly dash ed on towards the palisade, surrounding the village where he was. What a beautiful scene to see this in trepid Father among his flock encour aging them to expel the foe, and after a desperate struggle, seeing all hope of victory lost, baptize 'them and hear their confessions in the midst of a shower of arrows and bullets discharged by the assailants! What a consoling thought to those poor Indians, newly regenerated by baptism, or reconciled by confession, to hear from the lips of their spiritual Father: "Brothers, to day we shall be in heaven!" A mo ment later he was pierced with a hun dre...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1897

n fmWW-'"'" '"Mmimm n THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 63 on this voyage, his labors among the Illinois, are known to every school boy. France, his native country, may well be proud of him who ranks as one of the greatest heroes of America. A short time ago we beheld the tri bute of a noble people to the worth of God's nobleman, Marquette. Bigots may rave, and miscreants seek to de face this latest acquisition to the grace ful ornaments of our "National Hall of Statuary," but the memory of the Jesuit hero, enshrined in the hearts of an admiring people, can never be de faced or obliterated! It may not be amiss to add the names of Madame do la Peltrie, Mother Mary of the Incarnation, and Venerable Mar garet Bourgeois, whose piety and de votedness to the Indian cause have placed them in the first rank of the illustrious women of America. Of such as these, men and women, arc the pioneers who kindled the fires of the true religion on our shores. Others, adventurers and religious bigots, bringing nau...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1897

64 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. who die in venial sin may satisfy the justice of God, pay the debt of tem poral punishment due to sin, and be prepared for the joys of Heaven? Do we believe that through the .com munion of saints these souls are bene fited by our prayers and suffrages? We do believe it. We were taught it in our Catechism. It is preached to us from our pulpits. We know that the doctrine is founded on reason and com mon sense. We feel that there must be o state after death, where those "who are neither so bad as to deserve to go to Hell, nor so good as to deserve to go straight to Heaven, can be purified from their imperfection and defilement, and made meet for the inheritance of the saints in light," fit to enjoy the glorious beatific vision of God. Why, then, does not this extremely interesting and consoling doctrine take stronger hold of the minds of the great body of Catholics? Our Protestant friends realize the necessity of a middle state, and are groping after a substitut...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1897

v 'tWPyv&3it-vFpfw-"-" rir'i I'WW '-"yy'w' i;yi1 The Indian Advocate. Devoted to the Interests of Indian Missions. Vol. JX. JULY, 1897. No. 3. Written for the Advogatk. Catholic Scientists and their Achievements. By D. Carolus, O.S.B History since the period of the so called Reformation has been grossly perverted; hence the many calumnious charges preferred against the Church when it is a question of her relation to the world of thought and intellectual advancement. She has been denounced as the enemy of liberty and progress, and yet it is to her that we are indebted for both; and there is no more truth in the charge that the Church has been opposed to scientific advancement than that she is hostile to liberty and the progress of civilization, or to the culti vation of art and literature. As a mat ter of fact to tell what the Church has done for science would be to write a history of every branch of science from its very infancy up to the present and highly developed state which...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1897

- 66 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. -31 and successors. Later, it was employed by the professors of science in the uni versities of- Italy and other countries until in the time of Galileo and his school it may be said to have reached perfection. It is by applying the principles of inductive philosophy, by insisting on experiments that mediaeval and modern scholars have been enabled to make such wonderful progress in physical science. The Middle Ages have been emi nently productive of men of the widest and most brilliant genius, whose acts have become the romance, whose thoughts the wisdom, and whose arts the treasure of a thousand years. And yet we are told that it "was an age of darkness. The limit of this brief article does not permit me to enumerate all or even many of the investigations and famous discoveries made by monks, ecclesias tics and Catholic laymen, during the Middle Ages and modern times, in the science of physics, of chemistry, in astronomy and mathematics, etc.; nor their inv...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1897

" "' yfyjJM!PW.'iJf m'itlIJjyy'",Jiy''"' 'jtfyygyyjr.yfs " 'y " w i'ii'Wi'y wy u Mwwff TPIE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 67 ificationa. The first electric lamp was invented by Leon Toncault in 1848; and the carbons used for the lights were the work of M. Carre. Benjamin Franklin is reputed the discoverer of the identity of electricity and lightning, and the issuing of elec tricity from metallic; but the credit of both discoveries should be given to a Bohemian monk, Procopius Diwish. He was also the first inventor of the lightning-rod; and while this poor and forgotten priest was making his great discoveries, Franklin was receiving his first lessons in electricity from Dr. Spencor. To this Bohemian monk may be added tho Abbe Chappe d' Ant croche, who in France performed some of the most beautiful experiments in electricity and whoso fame as an as tronomer obtained for him in 17G1 a commission from the government to Liberia for tho purpose of observing and reporting a transit of Venus. Another sc...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1897

'f- 68 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. ters of exchange first in circulation. Post-offices, which at all times prove so useful, were established in Franco and Italy during the twelfth century. Cotton culture was introduced during the tenth century in Spain, Italy and Scicily. The silk-worm, like the cotton plant, is also an .importation from the East. Two monks brought it to Constantino ple during the reign of Justinian. Tea and coffee were first imported by the Portugees. Quinine, that celebrated antidote for malarial fever was made known to Europeans by Jesuit mission aries, and from this circumstance was called Jesuit's bark. To Catholic mis sionaries, also, are we indebted for the knowledge of numberless plants aiid animals which are carefully preserved in museums or used in laboratories of medicine. And so it would be quite possible to continue the list almost indefinitely. Much more could, be said about the Catholic scientists of England, Ger many, Belgium, America and other parts of the...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1897

wniP(;'Pt)i''ll)-1f.y,M mywyu1"1; "rJl t -mi rTyjsypn-v-T?" THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 69 . THE ANGELUS. " 'Tis morning, and the glorious sun has risen From his bright chamber in the rosy east." 'A dewy freshness fills the silent air, no sound is heard save the whispering of the leaves on which the breath of heaven "plays music to the birds that slumber." Nature has scarcely risen from her rest when the sound of a bell is heard. Softly and sweetly it rings out the " Angelus Domini nuntiavit Maria," and we bend our knees de voutly. "Ave Maria gratia plena," and wo are led in spirit to the humble home in Nazareth, where we behold a lovely maiden wrapt in prayer. Na ture has not yet put off her dusky robe; the moon is still in the sky, and its feeble rays form a dim halo around tlie head of the kneoling figure. A few stars linger in the heavens as if loath to leave their watchtower until the great mystery of this night shall have been acomplished. " Earth, only poor, stupid, unconscious eart...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1897

70 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. contemplates the majesty of God, while the mighty orb of day is slowly sinking in the western sky, leaving behind footprints of glory, for already the sun set is burning like " the seal of God " on the closing day. Pious worshippers may be seen at this hour seeking the quiet and soli tude of the church, where, like a speck of flame, the little sanctuary lamp keeps its long vigil to tell of the Di vine Prisoner in the lonely tabernacle. Here, wrapt in ecstucies of love, these holy souls kneel, while the evening shades gather around them, until the sound of a bell reminds them of the passing hour. Then, beneath the shadow of Mary's protecting mantle, they recite the heaven-born "Angelus," praying that she who has kept them through the day will guide them in the path of righteousness to the very end, that she will help them always, but especially in that dread hour when the evening of life is drawing near, and their fast closing lips are unable to re cite the be...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1897

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 71 it is tho Meskal. What is the meskal? It is a fruit (probably that of a cac tus, that grow 3 in the mountains of Old Mexico). It is of a dark greyish color, in shape resembling a mushroom, in size to half dollar, very bitter and pungent to the taste, and having some what intoxicating properties. In this fruit the Indian has the greatest faith. It is at the same time his great medicine and his medium. He believes that any good man that partakes of it is placed in direct communication with the in visible powers or spirits and that he derives from them an increase of life for body as well as for soul. It is the very essence of his worship. Let us come now to the ceremony that accom panies the eating of the meskal, such as were witnessed by us. The time fixed for worship is always after dark. So we had to wait till about 8 o'clock when a blow of a horn was heard, notifying us that all was ready. We started then for camp and were re ceived at our arrival by the ch...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1897

"tw1-' vw yvii iw'f$m!wyvr'T 72 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. evidently having its effect. Some' looked as if they were enjoying perfect happiness. My neighbor was all rolled up in devotion. He told me afterward how his life was saved by the meskal, when he was young and living in New York city with General X (it seemed that this general had adopted him), how doctors had all condemned him to die, and how quickly he recovered when he returned to his camp and was allowed once more to eat of the meskal ! Sud denly a loud cry was heard. One of the Indians had fallen sick. Violent vom iting seized upon him and he seemed in great agony. The other Indians looked sad and perplexed. I asked again my old neighbor what was the matter. ''Hip sick," he said, bad man "cannot take medicine." It is indeed their belief that no man if ho is bad, can eat the meskal; if his crime is great, ho may even die from the ef fects. Accordingly I judged that this fellow was a pretty bad man. When he had recovered from t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1897

f wi wf"pv""7vj THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 73 An infallible characteristic of meaness is cruelty to men or animals. 'rajF p iil" jiui nw T "'Ijy ry1 WSt T mn"V '$," -r Itye Indian SdVocatc Is a Quarterly ltcvlew, published by tho Rcncdlctlno Fathers of the Indian Tor., to plend tho cause of tho last remnants of Indian tribes, and to give a history of their progress toward civilization. It will contain, from time to time, a general history of each tribe j their progress in education and religion; their occupa tions, Industries, schools, etc., etc. Also, a history of our mis sions, statistics, and other interesting matter that can not be found in any other publication. Tho proceeds of this Review will be used for educating and converting tho Indians of the Territory. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE, Sacred Heart P. O , Okla. Tcr. Ai'i'KOVEn BY Right Rev. THEO. MEERSCIIAERT, Vicaii Apostolic of Oklahoma and Indian Teiikitoky. A Quarterly Roviow, entered at tho Sacred Hoart Post Oflico in Oklahoma Territ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1897

vywr -rnf 71" wrj "" vnvff''" TP WW1 74 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Some men never go to church for fear their shoes will squeak as they walk down the aisles. A health journal is telling people ''how to lie when asleep.'' If it could persuade them to tell the truth when awake, it would be doing a real service. Very Rev. Lanslot of Oklahoma City, sailed for Europe on Easter Mon day our Bishop, Mgr. Meerschaert left also for a tour to his native country. The time was when prairie wolves, coyotes and prairie dogs had possession of the land where now stands a pros perous city, containing an intensely Christian population. Rev. Father Isidore Ricklin, super intendent of St. Patrick's Mission in the Commanche country, sailed for Europe on the 12th of June. May he soon return to his dusky flock. The Catholic Mirror of Baltimore is responsible for the following para graph: "At a recent mission in this city the reverend missionary told the congregation to hold up their crosses to be blessed. An Iri...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1897

- TT-T-i jr . ;i,Jajq,.ijM ,ljklvamlJr'JT;r'f7-n:TrT, THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 75 upon him by those individuals who believe that separation of church and state, should array state and church in antagonism. He will be called upon to expend thousands upon thousands of dollars for new schools; and after he has built, them the Protestant sects will capture them and clamor for big appropriations to maintain them. The withdrawal of grants from the Catholic schools will necessitate the making of other provision for those schools ; but the Catholics of the country will see to it that they continue their excellent work. The Benedictine Fathers in Liver pool, England, have in their possession a chasuble made from part of the copes sent to King Henry VIII. in acknowl edgement of his pamphlet against Lu ther, and which earned for King Henry the title of " Defender of Faith." The chasuble was worn at a recent celebration in honor of the newly beatiiied Benedictine Abbots Rich ard Whiting, Hugh Farri...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1897

jsassssssssi 'tTW!W'iTrir7 76 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. error. But now the solemn moment has come, and one by one the com municants leave their pews and kneel at the railing whilst the trembling hand of the priest placed the Host of Heaven upon their tongue. How edi fying to witness such a beautiful sight; these poor ignorant children of the prairie, scarcely understanding how a piece of broad can be made to become the Body and Blood of Jesus Christ, yet believing and burning to partake of the Divine Food. May the beloved pastor of these Indian tribes live long to see those small plants grow, bloom and spread the fragrance of their Christian virtues. Closing Exercises at The spacious class rooms of St. Pat rick's Mission that had been tempor arily thrown into a hall for the occasion were well filled with visitors from Anadarko, Ft. Sill,. Chickasha and other points to witness the closing ex ercises for the spring term of that in stitution. Though many of the visi tors had traveled miles ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
x
Loading...
x
x