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Elephind.com contains 38,956 items from Minneapolis Journal, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 2 February 1901

s Mge was to be seen. The cat was Just eating the last piece. I was very angry then and wanted to put the cat out of doors. The cat started to run and I ran after her, l>ut I stumbled over a chair and fell against the table and knocked it over. All the Jelly, bread and dishes were lying in a heap on the floor with me on top of them crying. Just then I heard a knock at the door. I opened it and found my father and mother. When they surveyed the room and asked me what I was trying to do I told them the story of my housekeeping. I received a good scolding and did not show up in the house again that day. I never have been left alone to keep house since and cannot say I have any particular desire for a repetition of that pleasure. —Gustav Bachmann, Fifth Grade. Perham, Minn. With Dogr and Guns for Protection. (High School Credit.) The morning sun was just peeping over the horison, tinting the sky a golden red, when mother started to the next small vil lage to stay a few days. I was le...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 2 February 1901

trouble to wash the dishes in a pan and so dumped them into the creek and let the water and gravel wash over them until next meal time, when I fished them out and dried them. The boys came back to camp one noon with some trout they had caught and these, after much trouble, I burned to a crisp. Finally, as th<> result of my cooking, camp broke up three days earlier than expected. —Will F. Allen, Ninth Grade, Washington School. Cloquet, Minn. H A Bud Time for Indians. Not long ago my mother left my little sister and me at home alone. My sister grew tired of hearing stories and busied herself at a small blackboard. I picked up a history and read thus: "Indians are very unkind to women and children." The words were scarcely out of my mouth when I heard footsteps outside. I said nothing, but walked to the window, where I saw an Indian, or at least I thought I did. I said nothing to my sister, but told her I would take her to a small playhouse just outside the door. When I looked fr...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 2 February 1901

4 75he JOURNAL JUNIOR.. Ma.c Harris Arvsorv .... Editor. The Junior is published by the Minneapolis Journal for the public school children of the northwest, in and above t*e fifth grade, and is de voted principally to their own writings. There k.. no expense attached, and all are welcomed as competitors. The editor wishes to encourage cor respondence and suggestions from teachers. All correspondence should be addressed to the Kditor Journal Junior. John Marshall, Jurist. The name of John Marshall, chief justice of the United States from 1801 to 1835, is one which should be much better known to his countrymen than it is. The constitution established the government of the former English colonies and welded them into the United States, but there always have been many men of many minds, and until John Marshall was elevated to the office of chief justice, there were many contrary interpretations put upon the construction of certain phrases of the constitution, which greatly hampered all ...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 2 February 1901

US T* ¥-¥ IT rV I> ¥ ■'•■■l^- aS3^F- -<v ' • '^Q""" IBaaBI% .xT r-a^ gsss& PUR. AWEE§ Queen Victoria, methodical and foreseeing even to the end, left minute instructions as to her funeral, which were faithfully carried out in the ceremonies of the past two days. Xo great soldier ever had a more strictly military funeral than this, but soldiers and sailors and their welfare were ever close to the heart of Victoria. One striking feature of the cortege from Os borne House to the pier, was the procession on foot, in which her daughters, daughters-in-law, and her granddaughters fol lowed the bier, as well as the men of her family. This is a purely Highland idea and was probably caught by the queen in her Highland days. There was a continual booming of minute guns from the men-of-war lining the course (see illustration on this page) from the time the Alberta, bearing the queen's bier, left the Isle of Wight, until the last vessel forming the escort had passed. The original route...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 2 February 1901

6 The First Book By Minneapolis Juniors Continued from First Page. read it until I had unconsciously memorized it and would often after repeat it. There was one serious word to contend with and, though I do not remember asking about any other word, yet I recall that 1 had mama explain "conscience" and wa- so im pressed with its length and meaning that % few days after I cor rectly spelled it to a playmate with a momentary feeling of exul tation in my superior knowledge. I reread the entire book many times, then passed on to a wider field, but none of its immediate successors did I know or like so welf as this, the first book I read alone. —Tnlia Johnsen, A Eleventh Grade, 726 Huron Street SB. East Side High School. Whtui the Doll Was fhrixtcned. (Honorable Mention.) I remember distinctly the first book I ever read and how I came to do so. I had gone through the second grade at school, where I had heard the story of "Uncle Tom's Cabin" spoken of. So my thoughts always seemed cen tere...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 2 February 1901

book. Still, I-thought I would read it anyway, and anyone who has read any of the "Little Dot Series" knows pretty well how I liked it Several years after I received it, I read it again and that set me to thinking whether my friends were true or false. Once I told two boys whom I knew to stop me when I went out some place with a certain boy, whose friendship I wished to try. One day they caught me and said they would "fix me all right." I called to my friend for help, but he drew back and said that it was none of his business, and turned to go on. Then the two boys let me go and before I knew what they intended to do, they bad dumped him in a mud puddle, and there we left him. B Seventh Grade, —Joseph Martinson, Van Cleve School. 1837 Quinoy Street NE. HaJf Wai More Than Eaongh. I do not remember how old I was when I read my first book, but at any rate I was not old enough to understand the value of reading. I did not care for the story, but just for the sake of reading It. Every no...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 2 February 1901

8 QUEER FLOWERS I tome Shnpea >ujiK«■ st a. Resem blance to Certain Animals. Did you ever see a field of wild lark spur, with its rich colors—violet-purple, deep blue or white? In the center of each blossom the four petals form a little rabbit, with ears alert and listening. The white rabbit is especially pretty, and no one can fail to notice the odd likeness to the animal form. The colored leaves, which seem to be a part of the flower, are really the sepals of the calyx. You can also find the lark in the flower by pulling off all the sepals except two, •which are left for the bird's outspread wings. The long spur, which runs back ward, is the tapering body and long tail of the lark. When I was a child, it was great pleasure to see my hidden bird ap pear as the unnecessary sepais were re moved and it was just in the graceful act of flight from the stem. Another flower of the same family, the irild columbine, takes its name from co {.umbia, a dove, on account of the like- Bess oC ...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 4 February 1901

THE MINNEAPOLIS JOIJRNiS PEICE TWO CENTS. TO BUY ALL THE WIRES Government Ownership in Canada. TELEGRAPH, TELEPHONE Purchase Would Involve Something Like $25,000,000, BRITISH LINE AROUND THE WORLD Local Telephone System* Would Be Leased to the Mnnic ipalltles. New York. Feb. 4.—A special to the Her ald from Toronto says: The Domin.ion government has practical ly taken steps to purchase the telegraph systems of Canada, extend them enormous ly and operate them in connection with the postofflce department. It is also proposed to follow a similar course with the tele phone, but municipalities will be licensed, as in Britain, to operate the telephone sys tem within their own areas. With a sur plus running from 56,000,000 to $7,000,000 for 1900-01 and a prospect of an equally large surplus for 1901-02, the plan seems feasible. The great desire of Canadian statesmen is to see cables owned by Great Britain under the Atlantic and Pacific and joined at each ocean to wires owned by the Do mini...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 4 February 1901

THE MINNEAPOLIS JOURNife PRICE TWO CENTS. TO BUY ALL THE WIRES Government Ownership in Canada. TELEGRAPH, TELEPHONE Purchase Would Involve Something Like $25,000,000, BRITISH LINE AROUND THE WORLD Local Telephone System* Would Be Leased to the Munic ipalities. New York, Feb. 4.—A special to the Her ald from Toronto says: The Dominion government has practical ly taken steps to purchase the telegraph systems of Canada, extend them enormous ly and operate them in connection with the postoffiee department. It is also proposed to follow v similar course with the tele phone, but municipalities will be licensed, as in Britain, to operate the telephone sys tem within their own areas. With a Bur plus running from $6,000,000 to $7,000.'.'"<J for 1900-01 and a prospect of an equally large surplus for 1901-02, the plan seems feasible. The great desire of Canadian statesmen is to see cables owned by Great Britain under the Atlantic and Pacific and joined at each ocean to wires owned by the Do...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 4 February 1901

2 neers. Al, Day, Leonard's uncle, was the only other relative present. Walter H. Nichol of I>2G Seventh street SB was the first prospective juror called. He is in the mill machinery business. Mr. Nichol had no personal acquaintance with any of the Days. He had followed the case closely in the papers since Nov. 25. He had formed such an opinion as to the guilt or evidence of Hamilton as would require strong evidence to remove. He was excused. Augustus C. Lounsbury, an elderly man, insurance solicitor, of 710 First avenue X. Mr. Lounsbury knew Mrs. Day, mother of Leonard, but had not seen her in five years. He had a personal, speak ing acquaintance with the late Leonard Day, Sr.. and with W. H. Day. He admitted having read a little about the case. The impression made on him was that it was "an awful homicide." About all he remembered was the time and place of the tragedy. He had read nothing about the coroner's inquest and had dis cussed the case with no one. Mr. Louns tuiry admit...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 4 February 1901

MONDAY EVENING, FEBEUAItY 4, 1901. CONGRESSMUStHELP President Does Not Want the En tire Responsibility for Cuba. REASON FOR AN EXTRA SESSION Some ronvrriimen Think the Cuban Qne»tlon \» Aot in Their Province. Special to The Journal. Washington, Feb. 4.—The president is anxious that congress shall divide with him the responsibility of passing on the Cu ban constitution, and the problems in volved in the establishment of a free and independent government in the island. This is one of the most Important reasons wfcj the president is disposed to call an extra session. It is a more or less open secret that this government is not prepared as yet to re linquish entirely the leading strings iv which Cuba has been held. Moreover, it has always been the intention, before let ting them go, to see that the United States receives a satisfactory compensation for the money and men expended in setting the Cubans free. It has never been the president's idea to entrust the Cu bans with the war-making...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 4 February 1901

4 THE JOURNAL LUCIAN SWIFT, J. S. McLAIN, MANAGER. EDITOR THE JOURNAL. Is published •very evening, except Sunday, at 47-49 Fourth Street South, Journal BuildittaT, Minneapolis, Minn. c. J. Billson, Manager Eastern Adver tising. NEW YORK OFFICE—B6, 87, 88 Tribune building. CHICAGO OFFICE—3OB Stock Exchange building. SUBSCRIPTION TERMS Payable to The Journal Printing Co. Delivered by mall. One copy, one month $0.35 One copy, three months 1.00 One copy, six months 2.00 One copy, one year 4.00 Saturday Eve. edition, 20 to 26 pages. 1.50 Delivered by carrier. One copy, one week 8 cents One copy, one month 35 cents Bingle copy . „ 2 cents CHANGES OF ADDRESS Subscribers ordering addresses of their papers changed must always give their former as well as present address. CONTINUED All papers are continued until an ex plicit order is received for discontinuance, and until all arrearages are paid. COMPLAINTS Subscribers will please notify the office In every case that their paper Is nut .deliv...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 4 February 1901

MONDAY EVENING, FEBETJABT 4, 1901. I f ORSFTS I I NEVER i I' STRETCH I |Pn The moderately straight front R& G No. 397 wat and is lIU iJIJ the corset of comfort with the essence of style. It is straight \uMh *MJn enough for the prevailing vogue and curved enough to conform J|||m S* d to healthful anatomical lines. Every R& G Corset is sold with IMM JLJJ the understanding that it must give satisfaction to the wearer or {Put} pi V the dealer will supply a new one free of cost. More than eleven iHjfj f I thousand dealers now sell R& G Corsets, and every dealer will yfjJß LII get them for you if you ask him. There are seventy styles and firm /I ■ Jl^es—your style and size among them. In addition to the ivuM III" Tj popular 397, 197 and Empire, we make real straight front JOB 1L II corsets to retail at from $1.00 to $2.50. |R||i jii R& G CORSET COMPANY, YM J|J| 363 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. IfjU HAVE YOU TRIED IT? -NON-INTOXICANT- Household Tonic ALL DRUGGISTS Prep. By VAL BLAT2...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 4 February 1901

6 an news January Stamp Sale*— The receipts from stamp sales in the Minneapolis post oSttce for January were $67,219.27. This is an increase of $4,935.87 over the receipts in Jan uary, 1900, which were $62,283.40. Saw His Shadow— This is groundhog day, when, according to tradition, that animal breaks his hibernation long enough to come out and ascertain whether he still has a shadow. He saw oue to-day, and of course there'll be six weeks more of winter. Groceti' Meeting — The Minneapolis retail grocers will meet in Nicollet hall this evening to discusa the coming convention ot the state association at Stillwater. The dele gates to the national convention at Detroit will make a 1 report. A banquet will follow the meeting. A Memorial Service — A service ill memory of yueeii Victoria will be held at St. Pauls Episcopal church, Twelfth and Hen nepiu, Tuesday evening, at 8 o'clock. There will be appropriate addresses and music. Thu Clau Gordon and other societies will attend. All are inv...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 4 February 1901

MONDAY EVENING. FEBRUARY 4. 190 L VERXA The groceries we sell are such as the people can take with confidence, by which our business is continually increasing. Excellent Northern grown Sweet Corn, unlabeled, 60c dozen, or can .. 5c 1-lb can French Red Kidney Beans can 4c Good new California Prunes, lb 4c Good Evaporated Peaches, lb 8c Pure Lard, lb SM>c Besi Burbank Potatoes, bushel !!..!!. 48c Full (iu-lb bushel. Rutabagas, peck 5c Preserved Strawberries, cau «c Preserved Raspberries, can 8c 12 lbs Sweet Potatoes, for 25c --lb package H. O. Wheat for i To close out. California Pigs, good, lb package ... 6c Excellent Pickles, bot tie 8c The World's Best Coffees are here Fine Santos and Rio, lb IBc Robal; we put this fine coffee against any 35c coffee in town. Hoffman House Coffee, lb 30c Hard to beat at any price. 1 lb Full Cream Cheese 10c Boiled Cider, quart 15c Star Mince Meat, pail Gc To close out. Butter. Sweet Dairy, per lb 14c, l«c and 18c Fine Creamery, per lb 20e and 23c...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 4 February 1901

8 WHEAT MARKET DULL AND IN NARROW LINES May Opened Under 75c and Held on a Lower Range all Through. LARGE DECREASE IN THE VISIBLE Clearance* Heavy—Market Unre kpomtre Either Way— Business In Cash Wheat. Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce, Feb. 4. —The opening la wheat this morning brought out a weaker feeling and put May under 750. The first trading was below the Saturday close, at 74%@74'?%c The market touched 75c eeveral times, but would not go over it. Trad lug was quiet and in narrow lines, May not varying more than 'AC up to noon. Broom ball cabled that Liverpool wheat was very de pressed from excessive supplies, and the Liv erpool figures showed decline of with a clotse %d lower. The heavy bnowrall over the west and southwest helped the winter wheat outlook to the extent that much of the territory is now protected against the predict ed cohJer weather. In Minneapolis receipts were swelled by the addition of the Saturday run, and 816 cars were in, against 539 last year. Although t...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 4 February 1901

MONDAY EVENING. FEBRUARY J, 1901. F^f} VYI// Ff*£lfi thlO tTt fJJIP^ °thers do and will profit Journal Wants bring buyer and M?\J J> f \JfLl I CraU LI It lll • pPc? seller together quicker than any other kind of advertising RAILROAD RUMBLES. IT MEAXS ECONOMY Prevalent Hurt of the I*. P. on the I . P.-S. P. Combine. Xew York, Feb. 4.—President Horace G. Burt of the Union Pacific railroad, who Is now in this city, says: I do not interest myself in the road from the point cf view of a banker or broker, be cause I am fully taken up with the prac tical side of the property. If the Speyer- Huntington shares were purchased by the llarriman syndicate, they were purchased by people interested in Pacific securities and not by the Union Pacific. This union of interests, if such a step has been taken, will bring the l*nion Pacific into closer harmony with the Central Pacific, whose entire capital stock was acquired by the Southern Pacific in 1899. The Union Pa cific will continue to run thro...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 4 February 1901

10 Bjyffln 9 South Fifth St. ANOTHER DROP With every pound of 25c OR 30c COFFEE II Ibs3soc -——OR- |5 CANS" Eft ■£b Sugar Corn VUb OR iKiSI I jSack best Flour Mil Sack best Flour for IPIbVU Other Groceries equally cheap. g|lF*With every 5 lbs. of XXXX Coffee to one customer we give 5 lbs. Granulated Sugar Free This is the famous coffee the Minne= apolis Jobbers kept from the Re= tail Grocer for 3 years by refusing to sell him Gro= ceries if he carried it in stock. When we started the grocery to sell XXXX Coffee to the people direct, tße jobber saw hie mistake, and now we have made the Ketail Grocers our friends, by making them independent of the jdbbers, and soon XXXX Coffee Will be again in all the stores for sale to you, and we shall quit keeping grocery. Bo buy while you can at No. 9 South Fifth St. W. F. McLaughlin & Co The Largest Roasters of Fine Coffee in the World. 1 If you do not have a movement of the | E bowels everyday yon are sick. A teaspoon- 3 | fall of CASCABINE w...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 5 February 1901

THE MINNEAPOLIS JOURNALc PEICE TWO CENTS. NO REST FOR HER HATCHET Mrs. Nation Goes Smashing Between Arrests. RAID BEFORE DAYLIGHT Her Head Is Cut in a Scuffle for Her Hatchet. SHE ASKS CHILDREN TO SMASH Enter Their Names on the Page* of Indjiug Fame by Throw- Ins Hocks. Topeka, Kan., Feb. f>.—Mrs. Carrie Na tion launched her crusade against the "joints" of the city early to-day, and at the second place visited she was injured slightly by a hatchet cut on the temple. Mrs. Nation arose at 4:30 o'clock and coon afterwards started on a tour of the "joints," accompanied by Mrs. J. P. White and Miss Madeline Southard. She tried to enter a place at 830 Kansas avenue. The man on duty was taken un awares, but he managed to disarm Mrs. Nation, and he bolted the door before any of the party could enter. Mrs. Nation afterward said her friends held her and prevented her going in through the win dow. The next place visited was 406 Kansas avenue. The women entered without meet iag resistance, b...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Minneapolis journal. — 5 February 1901

2 Influence him. Such a condition of mind would be largely determined by the par ticular case. In some cases such scruples might not affect him. "But they would in this case," he added. When Judge Brooks questioned him on this point and he still expressed the Bte lief that he would be unable to conscien tiously consider the case, he was excused. Adlis E. Sage. 314 E Fifteenth street, who travels for a machine house, ni promptly challenged by the state for im plied bias when his acquaintance with the counsel for the defense was admitted. Under a challenge for actual bias, he said he had read at length of the case, had discussed it freely- Ac to the guilt or innocence of the defendant, he was at present somewhat inclined one way. It would take some testimony to remove the bias from his mind. '•Could you render an Impartial verdict solely upon the evidence given at the trial, notwithstanding what you have read or heard in the case?" "Yes, sir." Almost the Third Juror. "Challenge withdr...

Publication Title: Minneapolis Journal, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
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