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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1989

Farm Bureau Vol. 48, No. 9 Inexpensive seat VFBF addresses child auto safety By GREG HICKS VFBF Director of Communications Recently, a young rural Virginia couple and their small child were riding in their automobile down a dark, winding country road. It was raining and suddenly, on a sharp downhill curve, the husband lost control of the car. His wife clutched tightly to the 18-month-old. The car skidded off the highway and into an oak tree. The car was totaled. Both the adults survived with minor injuries. But unfortunately, the baby was killed. The situation was tragic. But perhaps more tragic was the fact that the child could have been saved, had he been placed in a government-approved child restraint seat. The Virginia Farm Bureau Federation is concerned about this type of accident, which is the leading cause of death for children under the age of 5. That's one of the key reasons Farm Bureau is now entitling members to purchase up to three child restraint seats at a savings thro...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1989

2 It's time to harvest crops and rural voices It's September and the fall harvest is under way for many of you. This time of year is always a challenge, I know. You're extremely busy. The pace is hectic. But I offer each and every Farm Bureau member some other challenges — some just as important to you and to the welfare of rural Virginia. They are the challenges of becoming more involved with your elected officials, while, at the same time, getting more involved in Farm Bureau's policy development process. As a Farm Bureau member, I urge you not to pass up these important opportunities. I can't stress enough the scope of this matter today. Why? First, this is an election year. Secondly, because farm and rural family numbers are shrinking in Virginia. That means more urban representation. And that means a smaller voice for farmers and rural Virginians in the legislature. Farmers represent only 2 percent of the population today. A fence is more than rails and nails here By ANGELA B. ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1989

September 1989 National Farm Safety Week Sept. 17-23 CHICAGO — President Bush has proclaimed Sept. 17-23 as National Farm Safety Week, the 46th annual observance. The National Safety Council estimates agricultural work accidents resulted in more than 1,500 deaths and 140,000 disabling injuries in 1988. The accidental death rate for agriculture was 48 per 100,000 workers, higher than any other major industry. The composite rate for all industries was nine per 100,000. Nearly 3,000 farm residents' lives are lost each year in all kinds of accidents, including work, home and off-farm traffic and recreational accidents, the council adds. Several thousand farmers and farm workers last year suffered work-related illnesses caused by excessive exposure to toxic gases, chemicals, dust, sun, noise and other farm health hazards. And, thousands more farm residents were seriously or fatally injured in home, highway and recreational accidents. The nature of farming itself is one of several reasons...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1989

4 jf J • ,J \ " «.' ',1 ■'']" < ■■ f " ■;jag**! ■/ - ' '"' ; ' r .^-:^y : ■;««!§; •». ■ ■ i^^HH^II I - ■ .SfSafe^SiaraE?j ' • VMSbCT^.*-. •■ ■■■■ 1 ; - ■ I 11 - ( i£&^ ; a'? i^-^l?' -£> " f ' l ?\ , * 4 *'' -■**• ' ,r ' y r iMi ■' r W&R&sj#*.,.. .s / . *w 1 v 1M .' '?f^5 1 5r.:.• Bm Bhl Yhi Can BankQnThe Vi rginia Farm Bureau's Benefits And Service. Now, you don't have to choose between plans, your major hospital and medical bills are Help is available at 88 Farm Bureau Counaffordability and the coverage you need. Plus, covered once you meet your hospital deductible. ties' offices throughout the state. Most are with the Virginia Farm Bureau Health Care For example, after you pay $200 for each hos- directly linked by computer with the Blue Cross Program, you have the added advantage of pital confinement Plan 200 pays many paid-in- and Blue Shield processing system. And, superior service. full benefits. Plan 500, similar to Pla...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1989

September 1989 Responsibility is part of gardening Groundwater pollution is a hot topic with environmentalists these days, and the Virginia Cooperative Extension Service is hoping it will become a hot topic with gardeners, as well. Despite the popular belief that most water and groundwater pollution comes from chemical plants or illegal disposal of toxic wastes, in truth, most of it comes from "nonpoint sources." That's us — gardeners, farmers, homeowners, all contributing a small amount to the mess. Those small amounts add up. The Extension Service hopes to educate us in ways we can prevent our use of lawn and garden chemicals from being a part of that pollution. If you want to be a responsible gardener, take the time to request Publication 426-059, "Groundwater Quality and the Use of Lawn and Garden Chemicals by Homeowners," from your Extension agent. It's about time to take a late summer or fall soil sample in to the office anyway, so why not kill two birds with one stone? (Do yo...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1989

6 " wHhJm If -a " / ' „ \ Ik:/?* ■9 E$ ' "191 m * i E^>m Traci Rickman helps with the family tobacco farm in Halifax County. (Photo by Kathy B. Springston) Miss VFBF wants active farm youth By DANA CARN Special to VFBF News HALIFAX — Mix an old-fashioned farm girl, an animal science major, a tobacco hand, a horse lover and an enthusiast for rural life, and what do you get? Miss Virginia Farm Bureau Federation 1989, Traci Rickman. Miss Rickman is more than a pretty girl with a title, banner and crown. She is taking her role as Miss VFBF seriously; in fact, she takes agriculture very seriously for a 19-year-old, today. "Agriculture is something we have to have as long as there are people," said Miss Rickman, whose family has farmed in Halifax County for at least five generations. She is the younger daughter of Kenneth and Louise Rickman and has a sister, Terri Jo, 26. Miss VFBF's commitment to agriculture fits perfectly with her role as queen of the state's largest farming ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1989

September 1989 Doctors get rural experience at Blackstone (Continued from Page 1) plea and persuaded the General Assembly to finance family practice training programs. Harris recalled the health care situation Blackstone, like most small towns, faced before that movement. Problems took root in World War 11. Before the war, Blackstone had several physicians with offices above and around the drugstore. All enlisted for military service except Dr. J. M. Hurt — when there were 100,000 troops at nearby Fort Pickett and the town population swelled to 25,000. Harris' brother, Dr. Epps Harris, joined Hurt in 1952 and the two worked together until Hurt died in 1958. Then, Epps Harris persuaded Dr. Stewart White to join him. In 1962, James Harris joined his brother and White. All three were Blackstone born. In 1968, the three built an office on Main Street. (That building was later expanded into the clinic.) "About that time there was an acute shortage of rural doctors," said Harris. A study ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1989

8 Virginia peanuts popular at home and abroad By RUSSELL C. SCHOOLS Special to VFBF News The peanut, while grown in tropical and subtropical regions throughout the world, is native to the Western Hemisphere. It probably originated in South America and spread throughout the New World as Spanish explorers discovered the peanut's versatility. When the Spaniards returned to Europe, peanuts went with them. Later, traders were responsible for spreading peanuts to Asia and Africa. From Africa peanuts were brought to Virginia aboard slave ships and were first grown in the New World around slave cabins. The first commercial peanut crop in Virginia was grown in Sussex County in 1844. For a long time, peanuts were considered simple fare. The War Between the States helped change the peanut status when the Union Army soldiers found them to their liking and took them home. After the Civil War, the demand for peanuts increased rapidly. High post war prices stimulated peanut farming in Virginia, an...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1989

September 1989 Disaster relief bill is signed WASHINGTON — U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Clayton Yeutter said the $897-million disaster assistance package passed by Congress is "as sound as could have been expected." President George Bush signed the measure Aug. 14. With legislators pushing to complete the legislation before recessing Aug. 4, the package passed the House without dissent and the Senate by voice vote. Qualifying farmers, whose crops are damaged by disasters like drought, flooding or frost, will be compensated at a rate equal to 65 percent of anticipated income. Stark Bro's FREE 1989 "Fruit Trees & Landscaping Catalog" \ Start growing your own full-size fruit on dwarf-size trees. I ) Nothing compares with the sweet juicy taste of home-grown fruit \ J picked fresh from your own trees Imagine the scrumptious pies. \ ®(/A/> / cobblers. |ams. jellies and just plain good eatin you II enjoy _ | 10 reasons why | I'lill llvvw I Stark Bro's is for you: fj...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1989

10 Horse racing moves forward NEW KENT — New Kent County residents could see their local economy boosted by at least $5 million a year if their hopes of gaining Virginia's first horse track come true. County voters agreed by a 2-1 margin July 18 in a required local referendum to allow pari-mutuel betting in New Kent. A 1,100 acre tract at the Talleysville interchange of Interstate-64 is proposed for the track. Farmers' Market sites advance MELFA — The Virginia Farmers' Market Board July 20 began considering a Hanover County tract near the junction of Interstate-95 and Interstate-295 for the state's Central Virginia Farmers' Market. Two Hanover County farmers are willing to donate adjoining parcels of land, according to Nancy Israel, program director. Just north of Richmond and accessible to population centers in the northeast U.S., the Hanover market site will include both wholesale and shipping point facilities. A budget request for construction of the facility has been sent to Gov...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1989

September 1989 Registered Simmental Bulls & Heifers, A.I. Sired. Black & Reds Breed for calving ease 703-980-0917. Purebred Tarantaise cattle. For information call 703-672-3946 or write G. Ashmun, PO. Box 645, Orange Va 22960 Bull Black Gelbvieh 18 mos. 1200 lbs. Al sired by black classic. Call Bill Walker 703-483-9644 Registered Polled Hereford Bulls and Heifers 12 months old. Crewe Va Phone 645-9193 ANGUS BULLS 650 - 700 lbs. 804-899-6171 evenings Bulls registered Angus 12 will rent or sell reasonable Box 115, Goochland Va. Dairy goats for sale, Purebred Nubians very good milk stock $85 and up. Phone 703-744-7363 Finns, Finn-Dorsets; Fertility-tested; Virginia Health Certified Flock with 250 percent lambing. 703-459-5451. Small Farm Flock: Dorset x Suffolk Ewes. Excellent Finnx Ram, Ewe lambs, reasonable. 804-376-5688. Suffolk Yearling Rams, Performance tested, blood tested. Health Certified Flock, Ready to work 703-337-1426 Pygmy and Angora Goats, Llamas, ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1989

Your risk doesn't stop when ■ I ■ • • your harvesting is over. Why should your coverage? I# M W ■ I ■ I St 7 * I MKVi feffld I HBEP9S. M jh V v ■ m j Hi i % ■. 'M, llw I K -1. mi KSmB k. m aVS&. 1h -'■ In the middle of the harvesting season a policy that offers protection for crops lost it's easy to overlook even something as in storage. The cost of the coverage is important as insurance of your crop minimal considering the potential loss, while it's in storage. The protection could cost as little or less With your investment in seed, fertilizer, that 1% of the value of your crop for up machinery and man-hours already incurred, to six months coverage. along with the potential loss of income, it 's Call your local Virginia Farm Bureau far too great a risk. insurance advisor today. Make sure your At Virginia Farm Bureau Mutual we have crops are covered all the way to the market. Virginia Farm Bureau Insurance Services Helping You Is What We Do Best. RO. Box 27552 • Richmon...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1989

Vol. 48, No. 10 _ ..... . d * ■ tWmjt . .. *^ No-till planting of soybeans into the stubble of a corn crop is a Best Management Practice some bay area farmers use to protect soil from rain so runoff contains less sediment. (Courtasy of Division of Soil C Water Coniorvation) Bay ruling Farmers should fulfill conservation plans From staff reports The state's largest farm organization is urging all farmers in eastern Virginia to implement soil conservation plans as soon as possible, following a recent decision by the Chesapeake Bay Local Assistance Board. The Virginia Farm Bureau Federation and other agricultural groups successfully lobbied the assistance board to scale back a minimum buffer zone requirement from 100 to 25 feet for cropland along waterways in bay protection areas. 'This is what Farm Bureau had originally supported, a 25-foot buffer with a conservation plan," said C. Wayne Ashworth, VFBF president. But farmers without an approved conservation plan will still have to mar...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1989

2 Fall brings good yields but poor prices Record yields are expected this fall for Virginia corn, soybeans and several other major field crops, thanks to an abundance of rain this spring and summer. The Virginia Agricultural Statistics Service is estimating corn yields of 106 bushels per acre, and soybean yields of perhaps 35 bushels an acre. The V ASS also expects records or near-record harvests in peanuts and tobacco. You'd think our farmers would be rolling in the hay, so to speak. But it isn't so. Ironically, prices aren't what they used to be. Because the Midwest and other intensive farming areas in the U.S. have overcome last year's drought conditions, yields are returning to normal, or worse. Translated, that means market prices have dipped dramatically since last fall. In 1988, corn and soybean prices were soaring and Virginia growers, although producing a below-average crop, benefitted from the excellent prices. With record yields expected this year, it's tempting to think ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1989

October 1989 . I 1 ||i§ri9!* **p ssTmg._ - Jk 1 I Ti 'iv-M-- M J1 il. i ■Hi J pp , rajpL^ Equipment like this baler, left unattended, could be the target of theft. Prevent equipment theft with ID plan By DANA CARN Special to Farm Bureau News Protecting your farm equipment may be an easier task with the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's Property Identification program. The program is designed to prevent farm machinery theft and help law enforcement officials identify stolen farm property. Each piece of a member's equipment is engraved in several places with a 10-digit number. By contacting the county sheriff's or local police department and paying a small fee, a member can have those numbers recorded in his or her name. "We mainly want it to be a deterrent for people who would attempt to steal (farm equipment), but if there is a theft, there's a way to hopefully trace it down... It gives us a starting point," said Mike Clark, VFBF's assistant commodities director, who directs the pro...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1989

4 On board: Speas urges producer-consumer understanding By KATHY B. SPRINGSTON VFBF Editor POWHATAN — Robert E. Speas, 56, who represents the Southside District on the VFBF Board, has seen many advancements in farming and rural living over the years. He was a teen-ager when electricity, refrigeration and telephones began to take hold in the farming community in which he grew up in Cumberland County. Chores on his parents' tobacco, poultry, beef and dairy cattle farm were tough in the early days for Speas, his two brothers and three sisters, but many improvements were developed. Looking back, Speas believes, "America got in too big of a hurry and has got to slow down and really start learning to appreciate things as we acquire them... In farming, we weren't aware of some of the problems that could arise (with technology)." He sees a need for more education — education of consumers about agriculture and education of producers about consumers and marketing. It's not surprising that he ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1989

October 1989 r'lfiPl IP® I ' " - 1 ■ • mI H UHh| ■■■■■ wßi -lww|pK ' hw| i ¥>u Can BankOnThe Virginia farm Bureau's Low Monthly Rates. You will see real savings with a Virginia For superior protection, other Farm Contact your County Farm Bureau SecreFarm Bureau health care plan. And, you Bureau options provide many paid-in-full tary to compare our benefits and rates with don't have to choose between affordability hospital and doctors' bills once you meet those of other plans. You'll learn about the and the coverage you need. your hospital deductible — either $200 or security and savings the Virginia Farm ™ ... . $500 —depending on your coverage Bureau Program offers. The reason: our health care plans cut selection costs not benefits. \bu don't have to give ' * Farm Bureau Program rates are based on your age and the area oj 0 Virginia where you live. up on quality health care protection. Superior service is another plus. Choice Care 1000 is our attractively priced Help is ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1989

6 Mark your calendar Through October: Virginia Employment Commission conducts prevailing wage and practices surveys and asks for farmers' assistance. For information, call 804-786-1014 or 804-786-8714. Oct. 8-14: American Dairy Goat Assoc. National Convention. Hotel Roanoke, with National Spotlight Sale Oct. 14 at 11 a.m. Contact Larry White at 703-862-1300. Oct. 11: Alternative Production Methods for Nurseries, Hampton Roads Agricultural Experiment Station, Virginia Beach. Contact Bonnie Appleton, 804-363-3906. Oct. 11-13: 41st Annual Virginia Conference on World Trade, Williamsburg Lodge and Conference Center, Contact Conference Administration, Virginia Chamber of Commerce, 804-644-1607. Oct. 14: Fall Fiber Festival and Highland Sheep Dog Trials, Charlottesville, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Contact Mark Reynolds, 804-296-5803 or Dan and Caroline Hershey, 804-277-9329. Oct. 14: Open house for Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center, Morven Park, Leesburg, 10-12. Contact Tom Walker, 703-771...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1989

October 1989 "iJYI I^QCDV BMP! 'jsfiiHf' i . tj^H Ifil pJ H /*4 ■ ■ Hl je 'V^^H ,\ ( v'wy,^,.' jAnH Legislative aides see farm life By NORM HYDE VFBF Staff Writer Whew! What a trip. In just three days, we visited 10 farms, a sawmill, a produce co-op, two county Farm Bureaus, the college of agriculture and life sciences and the Regional College of Veterinary Medicine at Virginia Itech. Our whirlwind tour of southwest Virginia Aug. 22-24 was designed to expose some very important people to the wide range of agriculture in Virginia—the legislative aides who help our congressmen and senators shape national policy affecting Virginia farmers. This year's guests of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, the Carroll County Farm Bureau and the Wythe County Farm Bureau included Mike Brown with Senator John Warner's office, Jeanne Hicks with 9th District Congressman Rich Boucher, Pamela Hyde with 7th District Congressman French Slaughter, Kevin Patrick with 2nd District Congressman Owen Pickett,...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 October 1989

8 Virginia Farm Bureau questions 1989 gubernt I • What recommendations do you have to enhance profitability in Virginia agriculture and forestry? WILDER: The Wilder administration will continue market-driven agriculture policies by encouraging diversification, marketing our products aggressively and funding high-quality research. Clearly, we cannot sell what people are not buying. We must encourage our farmers to expand into new types of production, when possible. In addition, my administration will strive to market our products in an effective manner, building on successful programs like "Virginia's Finest." We can encourage state institutions to purchase Virginia products, and we can expand the Farmers' Market network throughout the state. In addition, I will build upon the international trade initiatives of Gov. Baliles to ensure that our products make inroads into foreign markets. Finally, my administration will continue to fund outstanding research projects such as those we hav...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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