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Title: Seymour Express And Goulburn Valle... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 10,508 items from Seymour Express And Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook And Yea Advertiser, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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NO MISTAKE. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 6 February 1914

SNO MISTAKE. Ti1 mnanag,,r of ? certain coal com pany kniw.lhowr to look after his pence. I se waswhat is known and termed a hard and grasping man. "Hold on there, Bill," he shouted angrily one afternoon to an employe who was driving out of the yard. '"That coal eon't have been weighed. It looks a trifle largo for a to. to me." "This nin't a ton, boss, shouteo Bill, "it's two tons." "Ohl, right you are Bill," said the. u:magner, much mollifiedl. "Beg you: pardn,'. Bill. Go ahead. Bill." A well-known lawyer had a hors cross thie bridge leadling out of tile city. No wipping, no.urging would induce him to oross without stoppinrg. So he advertised hIhn: "To be sold for no other reason than tha~t tirhe owner wants to go out of town."

NEWS SUMMARY. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 6 February 1914

NEWS SUIIMMARY. The.revenue 'col!cted at the CusicIm House on- Janluary 23 amountud to:- Revenue;-- £16,2J7/12!1; S.!c,, £3,24 1216ti; contingent, £534/119/; i;ilotage, "£187/j/2; wharfage, £1005101i. Mr..: - Fitzpatrick (Chli -c·in..t .uoner for 1liat ays), lte"r nvesga 1,1o0. abroad, " ha {-.eotl e1 ?dtd beh adoption ol 1.tO L.du n e. tellm t au - tslatjiC .5;I l4 tlii · • h:i LEn oie M-tel Xvurna jubs. a,;, rsilws,, dI electri Since the beginiing of silte grain sea son on- Dec.trihr 1(i as many as .:.2,),794 bags of-wheat have been loan; ed at valrious-counmry statOns as com pared witil 1,594,8359 during the corres ponding period of 1912-13. Applica~:on has been mado.by several Tasmanian empioyet s to the High Court, for a' writ of prohibition regara ing the recent award of eho Fcderal Arbitration Ci ur;, in rspect of the plaint of the buoiders' Iborcrs. E very employer-ev n though it be only the emp.oyer oe a cidmietic ser vant---will bh eimpellecd to take out an insurance polic...

SO THEY MARRIED. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 6 February 1914

SO THEY MARR1IED. They wvoreo ngaged.- PI'rhaps heo re pented; perhaps ho did it only for fun. Said he:- . ' -"My dairlig'EtlLl, what would you say if I woro to toll you that I cannot mlarry you?" . "I Would say, my dearest loon, thatl I hivo i: big brother whli would make it warm for you,. :id that I 'haro somili of tihe little swcothea rt billets doux that would mak,- it expnsive for you, Georgo, dear." "But,. you know, I haven't said.it. ' "I know you haven't, my pot." "So wo'd- btter got married,, hadn't we?" "I thiank o, my previous."

Potato Spraying LIME-SULPHER EXPERIMENTS. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 6 February 1914

Potato Spraying LIME-SULPHBR EXPERIMENTS. In a report giving the results of to cent tests, the demonstration farm min New York State says it seems evident that lime-sulphur is not destinucdl- to take the place of Bordeoaux mixture as a spray tor potatoos, in spite of the fact that it is cheaper and no doubt very convenient to use. Under nmore favorable conditions, in which late blight occurred earlier in the season and to a greater extent, the treatment with l'me-sulphur might have produced different results, butt at proent is not promising. The limue-sulphu;r proved harmless to the potato fohlage as far as burning is Sconcernedl, but it proved to have a distinct dwarfing effect quite similar to that noted in the previous season's ex perimont. The linme-sulphur also lack ed the beneficial or stimulative effet derived from the Bordeaux nlxture. which preserved the folinge, prolonged the lifo of the plants, and thereby, in creased the yield even in thie partial absence of fungus disea...

LUCERNE—METHODS OF CULTURE. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 6 February 1914

LUCEnNE-METHODS OF CULTURE Lucerne is a perennial plant, and once well established will last a number of years--flrom four to ten, or more, depending upon. the character of the soil and tre atment of the plant in re ftrence to manuring and methods st cutting. The mature plant is a vigor ous feeder, its roots often penetrating to a depth of 10ft. or more. Its up right stemis do not sprout on outting, but die back to tlheocrown, from which new shoots start immediately and grow rapidly. This accounts for the face that from three to five outtings can be harvested annually. Lucerne is naipte, to a wide range of soil, provided the subsoil is open and porous, and well supplied w'th . lime. The -most favourable soil, however, is a deep loam, preferably'sandy in nature: overlying a not too compact- subsoil. Good drainage is highly essential, and on soils overlying heavy clay or hard pan subsoils great care must be taken to provide free escape of surface water. The lucerne plarit will soon di...

Sees all Things Reversed [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 6 February 1914

Sees all Things Reversed A boy who sees. everything upside dowun, writes from right to left, ,n verts all his letters and figures, and draws and copies any objects lthe wrong way up, has been discovered at Chester le- Street, Durham. He is 5 years old, and his case presents many similarities to that of an American boy reported recently. In an interview with tihe boy's teaoh er, a pressman obtained an idea of time peculiar working of the boy's mind. Not only does he write upside down, the teacher said, but he also sees up side down. For Instance, if hlie has to write a small "hI" the result is a "y" written ba kwhards; that is to say, tl?e coimmences to form the letter at the tail end-and work backwards. The same operatibn takes place when he forms the letter "u" or "nm," the ,-i feoct jein ihlat the letters are writtoi "n"- and "a" respectively. SHis mind acts in a sinilar topsy turvey manner when he is set to copy any figure or outline drawing. ils reading, however, is not affected...

Grit for the Fowls. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 6 February 1914

Grit for the Fowls. Some people have,the imprcssion that it is not necessary to supply grilt to fowls wIhich are on free range, as the birds will jind sufficient for their needs. 'This may be true when there is a gravel road or seashore, etc., near by to which the fowls have access; otherwise not. In a month's time a large flock of . wls daily foraging over the -ame splace will clear away all the :uiable grit from a large area. Uililes the tolws caln range where there is an unlimited supply of grit, it will be necessary to provide the:.i with a supply after a certain length or t~,ue, no iiatter how much range they enjoy. On land Where poultry had icier beed- kept ebiore, a flock might poss.bly get along for several years with the grit which the fowls could lind l t anud, but except in favorro situat.~ns the:grit supply runs out. So Lh2 poultry keeper must supply the laCs. Glit may be bought, as there are many brands in the market. Bult with a grit mill and the material, the poultry ...

RIVAL BURNT OFFERINGS. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 6 February 1914

RIVAL BURNT OFFEBINew A gentleman rushing from hisd:ning room into the ball and sniffing disgust e;dly, demanded of Jeames, the foot man, whence arose thie outrageous odor that was oervgding the whole house. p lo which Jeames replied:- "YoU isee, sir, to-day's a saint's-day. and the butler 'ee's 'ight church, and is burning hincense: Iand. ?he cook: she's low cbhuroh. and is burning broro gaper to bobriate, 'e Nlneml't

HOW TO KILL FLIES QUICKLY AND CHEAPLY. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 6 February 1914

HGW TO KILL-FLIES QIUICKL\ AND CHEAPLY. Professor R. J. Smith, enitoiologisl Nolth Carolinla agricultural station. says: "Formalini is a veSy socessful ,oisou for flies in spite of nmany re ports to the contiary. I- have recent: ly used it exteusively with excellent results. The metlod that I have found most successful is the use of fornialin in miilk with the following proportions: "Ope onces (two tablespoonfuls) oh forimalin; sixteen ounces (one pin.L) of equial parts milk and water.. "In this proportion the mixture seoems to attract the flies much better than when used in sweetened water The mixture should be exposed in shlallow plates. A piece of bread in tihe niiddle of the plate furnishes more space for the flies to alight and feed and in this say ser'es to attraot a greater niumber of them. '"I first used this poisos in a milki room where the flies were very numer ous and pioisoned over 5.000 flies il less than twenty-four hours on several occasions. Over a pint of flies were...

THE FATIGUE POINT. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 6 February 1914

THE FATIGUE POINT. N-othing is so beneficial to a man or a woman as to relax every muscle of the'body,to lie orat leastto sit with closed eyes for a short time every day. Many people cannot sleep, many can only spare aquarter of an hour for this rest, but if these would make a point of taking just what they can they would soon find a marked difference in their health.,. A human being-can work every day up to the point of fa tigue. without feeling any the worse, in fact it may be said that hundreds would feelinfinitely better if they had to work to the fatigue point every day of their lives. They would not then complain of loss of a ppetite or inability to sleep. But these ill ef fects, if they arise from want of work, also attack those who habitually pass the fatigue point. , To rest before just getting tired, is one of the very best means to prevent a breakdown. If mental or physical strain is continuedl, even a little too far for any consider able length of time, disastrous result...

THE DAY OF SMALL THINGS. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 6 February 1914

THE DAY OF SMALL THINGS. The name of Gibbonsais familiar to all philatelists, or known to all stamp col lectors but the-origin of his business has beoln a problem of nice surinise. nMI Edward Stanley Gibbons' first big stamn; deal (says the "Manchcster Gu:ardian") was probably his best. It was in 18(j3 that two sailors saw someo sheets of postage-stamps displayed in his rfather's shop m Plymouth. They inquired if he bought used stamps, and on being told that he did, they fetched a big sack of stamps froni their ship. This sack, they said, they had on in a shilling raffle at Capetown, and w-ere highly pleased to accepb £5 for it. The stamps were all triangular Capes, in cluding many rare "wood-blocks," and Mr. Gibbons estimated that he lhad made w\ell over £500 out of the trans iction. They would hlave beeln worth thousands to-day.

MELBOURNE LETTER [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 6 February 1914

MELBOURNE LETTEI (From our spcoial Correspondent.) Discretion is often put into use to grFeat advanutage, and those who are called on to use it require to be-broad mnilded Imecn of principle. An instance has jus1 been brought under notice whicre it could possibly have been, exer cised by an oli'er of the C(ustoils De pa:tment, .who demanded the sum of £fJ1,00 from -the. Victorian Gover\'nment as payment of duty on a "'borrowed dredge." To the lay mind:the thing is preposterous, and one is forced to agree with Mr. Joseph Cook (the Prime Mlinister) who said:-"It opened my eyes when 1 saw it. I understand it is a matter of Customs law, but it seems to me to be a law which works some what harshly when a Government has to pay £4,000 duty on' a dredge which it is only borrowing. Quite candidly, my inclination will be to see if there is any corner in the law which can be discovered to the advantage of the bor rowing State. If there is not such a coiner to be found, 1 suppose Mr. Watt, as a...

CHANGE OF HEART. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 6 February 1914

CHANGE OF HEART. I used to think when 1 was digging gravel, and whacking wood, to earn a bone a day, and whdn I watched the rich ones past me travel, my path oh scure was but a rocky way. I mop ped my brow with mly old red bandanna and longed to bask on downy bhrds of ease. and: live on birds and terappin and tmanna, and oysters fried, and fresh imported cheese. My wounded heart with anger used to quiver, lwhen noon time came and I sat down to eat and filled myself with onions, bread and liver, and moldy kraut and pickled porkers' feet. But now, alas, that I am rich as'Croesus, and live on quails, and scrambled peacock's tongue, I fold my hands in front (where all my grease isa and.sigh and yearn for days witen I was young. Where nabohs meet I sit and wield the gravel, my face each day the Board of Trade expects; but oh. the days when I as digging gra?el, when I could eat in forty dialects I The dear dead days when.m eal-timo found, me starvingl -Whon all was good.and nothing tasted...

TURF TOPICS. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 6 February 1914

TURF TOPICS. (By "Flemington.") Tasmania is not being so well patrorn iecd as usual by .Victorian owners this season. A few Melbourne horses have crossed the Straits, but the number horses epocted to make the trip were Loch Amos and Sylvanmore, but both met with accidents which will keeop them idle for the present. James Miracle, to Launeoston for the Cup, but Bcobio has soent the imported mare, he probably does not think a great deal of her chance. Delphic has also gone to Launccston, and as the Island does not seem to be particularly strong in stayers just iiow the daughter of Buba dil might give a good account of her self. Mr. J. E. O'Bricn, owner of. Bera goon, Malt King and other equme cole britiel, is undoubtedly one of fortune's favorites on the Turf. Mr. O'Brien won the Challenge Stakes on Saturday with Giolden flop, and it mnay be taken for granted thaf the stablu threw in lur something more than the stake. Every thing Mr. O'Brien touches scuesl'to turn out well. lie is onl...

MUSIC AND MEMORY. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 6 February 1914

MUSIC AND MEMORY.1 No training of tlhe memory from the musical point of view can be oomplete unless it be accompanied by a progres sive grasp of harmonic prillociplcs and.hy the development of the aural senlse. Generally speaking, too little is made of the possibihities in this direction open to the student iu the study of harmony. It is an often repeaetd axiom that ear training and the writing of harmony exercises should always be intimately connected, but too often the playing of the examples prevents the ful exer cise .of the aural faculty. It is here thqt the oulture of the memory should commence. Every exercise written should fiist be grasped by the ear and thein committed to memory. And the memorising process should on no ac count be done at the instrument,. but entirely away from it and it associa. .tions.-Ernest Fowles innthe "MU?:;, 8~t'doent."

PRESERVING EGGS—LIME v. WATERGLASS. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 6 February 1914

PRESERVING EGGS-LIME v. WATERGLASS. IFrank' T.- Shutt, chemist, of " h Experimental ~Farm, Ottawa, writis: "For the paSt. five seasons we have compared lime-water with 'water-glass' solution, with the invariable result that-the former preserves the eggs at least equally as well as the latter. Tak ing into consideration quality, flatvour, and appearance, we have adjudged the lime-water preserved eggs unsurpassed by any kept by the many and various methods that we have had under trial. We do not believe that eggs can be stored by any method and have the fla vour of the fresh-laid article-at least, thak is our experience, ..adid it is a large one. If you v~isls to add salt to the lime-water do not use more than 1 lb to 10 gallons. Some of our res sults seemed??o show that this quantity ' was an improvenient, bu larger m ounots most certainly affected the flavor. of the egg. Use only fresh quicklimaeI in making the "lime-water. Keep tihe eggs covered with the solution. deood spriig' wat...

ONE ON GEORGE. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 6 February 1914

, ONE. ON GEORGE., "Oh, my I" she exclaimed impatient? ,ly; "we'll be sure .to miss the first aot. We've been waiting a good many minutes for that mother of milie." "Hours. I should say," lie replied trther tartly. "OureP" she cried joyfully. "Qh, Ourge, thi" Y- s s sel"

HEALTH SUGGESTIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 6 February 1914

H.EALTH SUGGESTIOGNS. As a means wherelby they can red den tihe cheeks, not every woman un derstands the benefioias effect of a brisk rubbing with a slightly dampen ed towel. 1t freshens the skin, gives it color, takes off the rough outer sur face, and makes the complexion look youthful. Soap should not be rubbed on sponges, nor should they be left in water. Do not wring, but squeeze them out, and hang on a nail by a string. Sponges should be washed in warm water in which a sma'l auantity of tar taric acid has been-dissolved. This will keep them soft and a good color. Take care not to use too much tar taric acid, or it will spoil them. As a general rule those who suffer with their "nerves" should be care ful not to go away to a bracing seaside place when they are feeling below par; strong sea air is unquestionably very irritating to nervous subjects, and may lead to sleeplessness and other un pleasant symptoms in people of this type who are suffering from over strain. "if the skin o...

SINGING BEFORE KINGS. MME. ALBANI'S REMINISCENCES. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 6 February 1914

SINGING BEFORE KINGS. MMlE. ALBANI'S REMINISCENCES. Much interest has been aroused by the rdport that the King ahd Queen contemplate reviving the State con certs which were discontinued after the death of Queen Victoria in 1901. Itrused to be the.custom to give two concerts every season in the ball room at Buokingham Palace, and the Lold Chamberlain issued invitations for about 1000 guests for each of tlhom. "li Forty Years of Song." Mine. Albani, Queen Victoria's favorite si:lnger, who appeared at a State con cert one at least every ncnson for aany years. giving soalr interesting facts regarding the etiquette which prev.·i',l at th.sn Court tnctions. After rernl?l'inn that they. u:ere or tsnised bj the "Master of the

CATTLE BREEDING IN IRELAND [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 6 February 1914

CATTLE BRIEEDING IN IRELAND ' In an agricultural senso, Ireland may, roughly, be divided at the pro. sent time int, three portions, viz., North, West and South-West, and IEast and South-East. The former, where probably the lauid 'is best used, is devoted to mixed farming: Dairy ing is the principal industry in the humid W\est and South-West, the oreamory systemi beng in full siving, while the land df the East and South East is clhiefly utilised for cattle graz ing. That cattle-breeding is going ahead is indicated by some figures given in a special article which ap. peared recently in the "Times." This stated that in 1884 there were only 75 Shorthorn herds in Ireland, where as now there are 335. In 1884 ther, were but tw, nerds of Aberdeen-An gus, as against 96 ~t the present day. Professor Campbell, of the Irish De partment of Agrioulture, supplement 2d this recently by stating that since 1903 Shorthorns had increased by one third and Aberdeen-Angus by three thirds. The Shorthorn is...

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