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Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - ... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 382,303 items from Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
382,303 results
The WORLD of MUSIC [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

[The WORLD of MUSIC j YOUTH called to youth on Saturday night at the Town Hall. As each car drove up to the entrance it was remark able to see the number of little people who were brought to hear the boy wonder, Philip Hargrave. Girls and boys who had been made to practise long hours at the piano were promised as a reward that they should see the star's skilled hands. They helped swell the applause with their vehement hand-clapping. The gem of the offerings was a huge jar of sweets. Juveniles in the audience envied that more than the laurel wreath which the small boy bore in his hand when he came forward to make his quaint, for- mal, little bow. HAZEL KING, only child of Sir Kelso     King by his second marriage, is going to England shortly to study sing- ing. She is said to have a beautiful mezzo-soprano voice of deep, rich quality. Her half-sister, Mrs. Waring, has lived in England since her marriage (making one trip to Australia with her family a few yea...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
SCHOOL RADIO LESSONS ARE POPULAR [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

SCHOOL RADIO LESSONS ARE POPULAR The new idea of radio broad- casts for school children is popu- lar with our educational authori- ties. Mr. H. S. Dettmann, principal of Syd- ney Grammar School, thinks the proposition most attractive. "The recent headmasters' conference has appointed Mr. Le Couteur, of New- ington, and myself, to look into the mat- ter," he said. "I wish they would send me a circu- lar," said Mr. Parkinson (King's). MENTAL INDIGESTION "I always think the more outside in- terests one can bring into a school, the better, although certainly there is such a thing as mental indigestion. "When I was in Europe I found the most enthralling and informative things I heard were contained in broadcasts by a former member of the Geneva Con- ference on doings in Europe day by day. "As I believe teaching should suggest a course of study rather than cram the scholar with facts, I think it might be best to sketch an outline for working iin one broadcast, and next lesson to fill in t...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
RANDWICK WAS WINTRY [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

RANDWICK WAS WINTRY A WINTRY grey sky and a searching wind at Randwick on Saturday last made every woman glad to gather her furs tightly around her and nestle cosily into the high collars which fashion has ordained. Bare necks are no longer modish, so tight up to the throat chokers were very welcome. Many race lovers preferred to be at the last meeting of the King's Birthday races, although polo was a formidable rival at Cobbitty. Among the habitues at Randwick on the official stand were Mrs. Victor White, who came in a Royal blue hopsack redingote. She wore   a small hat of the same material. Mrs. Oliver Osborne looked as smart as usual, and sported a plaid suit of the latest cut, with a vest of absinthe green, which gave it a distinctive note. Her daughter, Daisie, who was with her, wore a beige duvetyn of biscuit tone tailleur. The hat matched her suit. Mrs. Osborne's daughter. Olma, is still in the country. Her marriage to Bill Gordon is planned for August. Mrs. Spe...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
GIRL CHEMIST [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

GIRL CHEMIST A NEW department has recently been opened at St. Luke's Hospital in the form of an up-to-date dispensary com- plete with all modern equipment. This new department is in the charge of Miss Doris Coombe, an Australian girl educated at the Sydney High School, who has had wide experience in phar- maceutical chemistry since 1925. Miss Coombe has successfully carried on her own business as a suburban chemist for the past three years, and, apart from this, has done a consider- able amount of relieving work and dis- pensing at many pharmacies, and also at hospitals, throughout the State. The dispensary was not planned as a profit-making concern, but will be run entirely for the benefit of the patients. Finding the mystery couple will be an added charm to the dancers at the masked, plain and fancy dress ball, that the Northbridge Branch of the Royal North Shore Hospital Auxiliary Service League has arranged to take place at the Masonic Hall. Northbridge, this Saturday. Mrs. J. T...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
"CANCER HOUSES" [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

"CANCER HOUSES" When wives are inspecting new houses in which to move, they are some times disturbed by the knowledge that one, or perhaps two, previous tenants have had cancer. There is a super- stition that a house may be a "cancer house." More than one reference has found its way into various medical papers in the past few weeks concerning "cancer houses." The current "Lancet" tells of still another medical effort to lay the ghost of this story, "a hardy perennial," as it is called. The theory is often advanced by non- medical people that certain houses must have a cancer risk because a number of people inhabiting them have died from cancer. The French Academy of Medicine has just had a report presented to it con- cerning the city of Lyons, a report which investigated the cancer deaths there over a period of 20 years. Of the 23,000 odd cancer cases recorded as many as 18,000 had occurred in houses in which there had never been a cancer-death before. Of the remaining 5000, almost ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
POTS and PANS Thrilled FAMOUS NOVELIST! [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

POTS and PANS Thrilled FAMOUS NOVELIST ! T'HE typical London intellectual often has a languid scorn for such work- aday things as pots and pans, and cookery books, but Miss Helen Simp-   son, the brilliant Australian novelist (whose latest book, "Boomerang," has   just been awarded the James Tait Black Memorial prize), is not ashamed to admit that for her things domes- tic have a perpetual fascination. Being A successful housewife means every   bit as much to her as do her literary achievements, writes Neil Murray, our   correspondent in Europe. THIS Australian is recognised as one of London's foremost authorities on cooking, and at present is being "starred" in this role by the B.B.C. She talks every Saturday morning at a time which coincides with the Empire broadcast from London for the Australasian zone. In private life Miss Simpson is Mrs. Denis Browne, wife of the famous chil- dren's surgeon, and to-day, when I called to see h...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Confession [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

  Confession I have felt the tears of   heaven fall; I have heard the anguish   of the sky;   I have seen the flashing over all Of God's great eye. Your tears that you would   fain recall,   Your faint involuntary cry.   Your glance . . . are more to   me than all The wrath on high. -Sydney Gordon.  

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
LOUISE MACK'S Diary [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

LOUISE MACK'S Diary   "Give me my moments, you may have your years." -Richard Middleton. My little diary is about personalities, and is for women. But men can read it too. li's to be kept up-to-date as all good diaries say they will be. Most of them forget all about it for six days or seven weeks, and then get discouraged and tear out what's written and use the little book for the grocer. My little diary won't be like THAT! lt intends to keep "orn and orn and orn" as Michael Arlen said of the Americans having heart to heart talks with each other. MRS. WILLIAM MACLEOD (Conor O'Brien) WE went for a walk, a divine walk, Conor and I last week. Fancy, it must have been 30 years since we last went for a walk together. And there were all the old things alive again, and sing- ing in our hearts, love of Nature, love of beautiful words, love of poetry, love of solitude, love of dear old Manly and the ocean beach, and the pine trees; love of brilliant conversation, of satire, and ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
LOWER—ONCE A WEEK [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

  LOWER - ONCE     A WEEK     AN article by L. W. Lower,   Australia's most famous     humorist, will appear on this     page every week. Lower has     been ranked with the leading     fun-makers in the world. His     articles will be illustrated by     WEP, the brilliant young Austra-     lian caricaturist, sculptor, and   artist.  

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
RIGHT FINISH IN JUMPERS [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

RIGHT FINISH IN JUMPERS EVERYONE can knit a jumper, but how few realise the importance of careful pressing and finishing. It will make or mar the finished article. Pin each section on to the ironing blanket. Don't think you can hold it in shape as you go along, and don't rub the iron up and down. Press evenly all over the work. If you find the sleeve a little short stretch it to measurement, and when pressed with a damp cloth leave it pinned to the blanket until it is quite dry. The body can be stretched in the same way. To join edges of knitting work, a crochet hood and simple chain stitches are far neater than joining with needle and thread. When adding any trimming, pin in place and try on. It looks one thing on the table and quite another on the figure. Always knit into the back of newly cast-on stitches to ensure a firm edge, and slip the first stitch of each row to facilitate joining up. When using two or more colours, twist the wool at the back as you go. Do not loop it from ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
INTERESTING PEOPLE... Let's Talk Of [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

INTERESTING PEOPLE . . . Let's Talk Of   MRS. JOHN MAUND MRS. JOHN MAUND, who has just been appointed district superintend-   ent of the New South Wales district of the St. John Ambulance Brigade, came to Australia in her youth, as Georgie O'Meara, to support Lionel Atwill in "The Whip." She married "in her first season," like Mary Chatteris (Mrs. Bell Allen), Blanche Browne (Mrs. MacIn- tyre), and other young English visitors. Since marrying the well-known solici- tor, Mrs. Maund has retired into private life, devoting herself to her artistic home in Ocean Avenue, Woollahra, and her three growing sons. She has recently appeared in amateur theatrical produc- tions, notably as the costumiere in "Nine Till Six," and as Mrs. Sanger in "The Constant Nymph," and a short time ago produced a play at Cranbrook in aid of the Playing Fields Fund. Another hobby is politics. MISS JOLLIE SMITH ONE of the vague traditions in the world of women is that the law is beyond t...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
They MIX Their SCIENCE with ROMANCE [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

They MIX Their SCIENCE with ROMANCE Both Mr. and Mrs. Ward are accomplished   musicians, and when the de- mands of science are over for the day, music comes into its own. Science is NOT the enemy of Romance. Yon don't believe it? Then Mel Ward, the distinguished Sydney naturalist, and his pretty young wife, will convince you. Mel Ward will tell you all there is known about crabs, supposing you want to know. When he was in America the President of The United States sent his car to convey the youthful scientist to an interview with him at The White House. He also delivered an address at The British Museum, and now is to talk over the air in the science series for schools. Crabs are not just crabs to Mel and Hal Ward. To devote   one's life to study has   its own reward. MEL WARD was   searching for     crabs when he   first saw the girl       student he was...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
LOVE Stories that CHANGED HISTORY The Splendor of Cleopatra [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

LOVE Stories that CHANGED The Splendor of Cleopatra HISTORY HAD she lived in these days, even the   lavish splendor of Ziegfeld and the exotic lure of the Hollywood film vamps would have dimmed none of the im- memorial charm of Cleopatra, "The Ser- pent of Old Nile." All the arts and fascinations by which men are allured and maddened were hers. And, apart from her natural beauty and charm, she possessed to the nth degree what nowadays we call sex-appeaL Ruling queen of Egypt, at 28, she lived in a palace at Alexandria in the year 41 B.C. At her age, in the East, most women have lost much of their bloom, but the beauty of Cleopatra was ageless. Great ambitions possessed her. She longed to add to her Egyptian do- mains most of the rich territories in the adjacent area of Asia Minor and to be the ruler of a mighty State. But in those far-off days it was the strong hand that prevailed, and Cleo- patra lacked the armies and the mili- tary genius that would enable her to gras...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Noted Hockey Visitor [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

Noted Hockey Visitor WOMEN hockey players are looking forward to welcoming the only honorary life member of the Australian Women's Hockey Association, Miss Edith Thompson, who visited Australia pre- viously as manager of the 1926 English hockey team. Miss Thompson arrives early next month, but as she intends being present at the All-Australian Hockey Carnival in Adelaide on July 30, her visit to Sydney will be of short duration. Miss Thompson has arranged and ac- companied the various teams on their visits to Holland, France, Germany, Denmark, America, South Africa, and Australia. It was she who organised the Empire games, which were held in South Africa in 1930, and at which our first overseas team played. She was a member of the All-England Hockey Council for 20 years, and has been president for six years. Miss Thompson has had a very dis- tinguished career in other fields. She was controller of inspection of the Queen Mary Army Auxiliary Corps from 1917 to 1920, for which she was...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
TREASURES FROM THE PAST [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

TREASURES FROM THE PAST Sydney folk will see a collection of unique interest at the Loan Exhibition of Antiques at Dymock's Building, which Lady Isaacs came from Canberra especially to open, in aid of the Kinder- garten Union of New South Wales. Mrs. David Cohen, who is a daughter of the Governor-General and Lady Isaacs, has been one of the company of enthusiasts who have worked early and late to make a distinctive show, her own entry being a clock that ticked away the hours on that night of the famous ball which preceded the Battle of Waterloo. Another interesting entry is that of a wedding dress, with real lace frills, which was once the treasured possession of Jane Austen.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

GARY COOPER, one of the most romantic personalities in the talkie world to-day, as he appears in "Farewell to Arms," at the Prince Edward Theatre.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

A SENTIMENTAL close-up of Zita Johann and George Brent in "Luxury Liner," now appearing at the Empire.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

VELirt Lit< . , ociore she turned author, was a well-known Sydney press girl. Her first novel, "No Escape," met with instantane- ous success. -Dorothy Welding

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
FILM DIRECTORY [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

FILM DIRECTORY Lyceum: "Hello, Everybody," fea- turing Kate Smith, and "Discord," with Harold Huth. Empress: Ruth Chatterton in "Frisco Jenny," and Lowell Sher- man in "False Faces." Lyric: "Rasputin and the Empress" (Lionel Barrymore). Mayfair: "Tell Me To-night," with Jan Kiepura, and "Her First Af- fair." Theatre Royal: "Honi Soit," an Ernest Rolls production.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 24 June 1933

From Nell Murray, Special Repre- sentative in Europe for The Aus- tralian Women's Weekly.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
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