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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Smuggling Jewels. INTO AMERICA. SOME CLEVER DODGES. WHICH DON'T COME OFF. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

Smuggling Jewels.           INTO AMERICA.   SOME CLEVER DODGES. WHICH DON'T COME OFF. One very interested party in the sale of the Hope blue diamond (mentioned in previous is- sues of "The World's News") is the United States Government, which will levy Customs du- ties amounting to £3000 on that gem before it reaches its purchaser. That is, assuming that the United States Government appraisers, who are pretty smart at their business, agree that it is only worth £30,000, the price at which Messrs. Frankel, diamond merchants, of New York, say they have acquired it from Lord Francis Hope. In Hatton-garden the story ran that £50,000 had been paid for it, and if this is so the Federal authorities will find it out, and demand £2000 more duty. They have their secret agents in London and Paris, so that the trick will be easily disco- vered. If the Hope diamond had been uncut, it would enter the States free of duty...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PERPETUAL MOTION CLOCK. GOES WITHOUT WINDING. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

PERPETUAL MOTION CLOCK. GOES WITHOUT WINDING.   A watchmaker has invented a clock which has,   it is said, never been wound up, as it has no   mainspring, and its works consist of but three   wheels. The   clock, which is   in the form   of a pendulum   weighing forty   pounds, is sup-   ported from the   top by a very   thin piece of   steel about two   inches long and   half an inch   wide.   The pendu- lum rods are   made of dif-   ferent kinds of   metal, to com-   pensate for   contraction and   expansion, and   the whole thing   is adjusted to   beat actual sec-   onds.   All that was   required to set &...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NOTEWORTHY SAYINGS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

NOTEWORTHY SAYINGS. The first step to knowledge is to know that we are ignorant. To endure calamities with patience is the mark of a valiant mind. The day is always his who works in it with sincerity and great aim. We often do more good by our sympathy than by our labor. There is always work, and tools to work withal, for those who will. It is by patience and self-control that the truly heroic character is perfected. To forgive a fault in another is more sublime tban to be faultless one's self. True happiness consists not in the multitude of friends, but in the worth and choice.—Ben Jonson. A good heart is like the sun, for it shines bright and never changes, but keeps its course truly.— Shakespeare. The wealth of a man is the number of things which he loves and blesses, which he is loved and blessed by.—Carlyle. Self-reverence, self-knowledge, self-control; These three alone lead life to sovereign power, Yet not for power (power of herself Would come uncalled for), but to live by l...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TO BREAK MONTE CARLO. LORD ROSSLYN'S PLAN. NOT ENTHUSIASTICALLY RECEIVED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

TO BREAK MONTE CARLO. LORD ROSSLYN'S PLAN. NOT ENTHUSIASTICALLY   RECEIVED. A London telegram to the New York "World" says:—"The Earl of Rosslyn, a whilom admirer   of Mrs. Langtry, but more recently acting with Mrs. 'Pat' Campbell, has been making a gallant   attempt to raise 100,000dol. capital to put in   operation an infallible system for breaking the   bank at Monte Carlo."   The Earl is giving demonstrations of the sys-   tem to intending subscribers, and at present is   subjecting it to a test of 20,000 coups, occupying   four whole days. He had a complete roulette   "lay-out" placed in his rooms in Jermyn-street, and engaged a croupier from Ostend to conduct the play. His system is based on abstruse mathematical   calculations, causing a strain impossible for one   man to bear continuously, so he must have two &nb...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CHEVALIER AUTOBIOGRAPHY. SOME AMUSING STORIES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

CHEVALIER AUTOBIOGRAPHY.   SOME AMUSING STORIES.     Autobiography (says the "Daily Mail") is one   of the most charming forms of literature—pro-   vided the writer possess an interesting person-   ality; and assuredly Albert Chevalier, whose   work is instinct with originality and those re-   markable qualities that come from a natural   gift for studying minutely from the life, is,   with his wide and varied experience of men and   manners, one of the most interesting of latter-   day personalities.   Though but a man of 40, it was inevitable that   he should write his autobiography sooner or   later; and readers of "Before I Forget—" (T.     Fisher Unwin) will be grateful that he has   chosen to do so sooner rather than later.   In these...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE CORONATION. CHINA'S REPRESENTATIVE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

THE CORONATION. CHINA'S REPRESENTATIVE. It is reported that Prince Su, a descendant of   one of the eight "iron-capped" princely families   which followed the first Empire of the present   Manchu dynasty, Shun Chih, into China, and   assisted in the conquest of the Empire from the   Chinese Ming dynasty, has been chosen by edict   to go to Great Britain next year to represent the   Emperor at the Coronation of King Edward   VII. It is also stated that Prince Su's first intention   was to go abroad for a tour of pleasure and   instruction, visiting the United States also.   Subsequently, it being understood that the British   Government would be pleased to have a Prince     of the Empire to represent China at King Ed-   ward's coronation, it was decided that Prince   Su should do...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PETRIFIED OAK. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

PETRIFIED OAK.   A remarkable deposit of petrified oak has been   "mined" by a Russian timber merchant during   the last half a dozen years. It exists in a river   of South Russia, in layers 3ft. or 4ft. deep   scattered over 150 square miles; and its most strik-   ing feature is its variety of colors, supposed to   be due to the variegated soil of the river bottom.   Not leas than 12 shades of pink, blue, yellow, and   brown have been noted, each log having its own   uniform shade. The logs taken out have ranged   from 40ft. to 200ft. in length and 151n. to 20in. in   diameter; and it is estimated that more than     150,000, averaging 70ft., remain.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BEFORE A MADDENED BULL. A LADY POSED. FOR SEVERAL MOMENTS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

BEFORE A MADDENED BULL.   A LADY POSED. FOR SEVERAL MOMENTS. This is the story of how Dona Tancreda, an unarmed woman, recently posed as a statue for several moments before a maddened bull in the arena at Bonbaix, France, and escaped without a scratch. Did the furious beast believe that she was really a statue, or did some glimmering recogni- tion of her beauty, her courage or her helpless- ness move him at the last instant to refrain from attacking her? These are questions for those who deal with brute psychology. At any rate, the performance of Dona Tan- creda is one of the most intrepid on record, and was witnessed by hundreds of spectators. It was to have taken place at Paris, but at the last moment was forbidden by the authorities. At Bonbaix the police had fewer scruples. The woman escaped entirely unhurt. At a given signal Dona Tancreda, dressed en- tirely in white, drove into the bull ring, in a carriage splendidly ornamented and drawn by four horses. Throwing o...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FACTS ABOUT RUBIES. WELL WORTH KNOWING. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

FACTS ABOUT RUBIES. WELL WORTH KNOWING. All the world loves a ruby—or should; and all who know their fascination will welcome some facts concerning them which have been given currency by a Paris technical journal, "Le Dia- mant," which are of timely interest, in view of the increasing popularity of these gems and their recent material advance in price. There are three varieties, Oriental, Siamese, and the spinel. The first is the most beautiful of all colored gems. They are becoming more and more rare and weight for weight are valued 10 to 20 fold the price of diamonds. The best come from Ceylon, India, and China. The Siamese rubies are very dark red, the spinel is less richly colored. The largest ruby known is one of the crown jewels of Russia. The Shah of Persia has a ruby of 175 carats. Gus- tavus Adolphus of Sweden had one of the size of a small egg and of perfect water, which was pre- sented to the Czarina of Russia in 1677. In 1791 France had in its crown jewels 81 Oriental ru...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FRUIT V. ALCOHOL. FOR ASSUAGING THIRST. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

FRUIT V. ALCOHOL. FOR ASSUAGING THIRST. The more fruit you eat, the less alcohol you crave. Such is the latest scientific theory. In the first place, the amount of water in fruit is considerable. In water melons it is no less than 95 per cent., in grapes 80 per cent., in oranges 86 per cent., in apples 82 per cent., in pears 84 per cent., in plums 80 per cent., and in strawberries 90 per cent., not a fruit in the whole category containing less than 80 per cent. The irresistible conclusion, considering these facts, is that fruit plays an important role in diet as a thirst-quencher. Certainly when fruits are freely represented in the diet less fluid requires to be consumed; and fruits would appear to be endowed with a subtle inimitable flavor which is ample induce- ment to imbibe fluid in this most wholesome form. The question so prominent in most people's thoughts as to what to drink might, therefore, on sound physiological reasoning, be answered, eat sound, ripe, juicy fruit. It is ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AMERICAN BLOOD STOCK. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

AMERICAN BLOOD STOCK. The sales of blood stock at Newmarket are not, as a rule, of great importance at the autumn meetings, Messrs. Tattersall having of late years held a general sale there in the first week of De- cember; but considerable interest attached to the auction held there early in November, as a num- ber of horses belonging to Mr. Whitney, the American speculator, who has done so well with his racing stable this season, were brought to the hammer. Among them was Water Shed, win- ner of the Cambridgeshire the day before, and he was sold to Lord Howard de Walden for 2600   guineas. This was not the highest price, as Mr. George Thursby, who had already given 2200 gui- neas for the three-year-old Holstein, and 1330 guineas for Fighting Furley, was determined to secure the two-year-old daughter of Henry of Navarre and Mount Vernon, and went as far as 8200 guineas for her. Altogether Mr. Whitney had a very good sale, the ten lots realising 11,165 guineas, and he re...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Federal Tariff Story. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

A Federal Tariff Story.       Customs Officer: You must pay duty on all     this beer.     New Arrival: What's that? Pay duty? Never!       Good morning, sir: you may keep the empties.   —After "Judge."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
INSANITY MAY BE THE RESULT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

INSANITY MAY BE THE RESULT.   A leading German specialist in mental diseases has been investigating the causes of insanity among women, and has come to the conclusion that if women are admitted into competition with men the inevitable result will be a tremendous increase of insanity among the women. He finds that the percentage of women teachers who be come insane is almost double that among teachers of the opposite sex.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MAKING BEES WORK OVERTIME. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

MAKING BEES WORK OVERTIME.   Those engaged in producing honey on a com-   mercial scale are discovering expedients for   making bees forget the progress of the seasons,   and work a much longer period of the year than they are disposed to do under normal condi- tions. Years ago an enterprising Yankee hit upon a novel plan of combining pleasure and business in connection with honey production. He built a large craft, which was a combination apiary and houseboat, and launched it on one of the Western rivers. In summer he would work his way up to the headwaters of the Missouri River, and as the weather got cooler he drifted down as far as New Orleans. In this way he managed to keep in a flower or blossom belt nearly all the year, and had a great deal of fun on his own account. A modification of this idea has been adopted by C. L. Graham, of Wodlands, Cal., and is said to be very profitable. He has 600 colonies of bees, from which he g...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ROOMS THEN LOOK LARGER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

ROOMS THEN LOOK LARGER.   To make a small apartment appear more spa- cious, bare pictures on the walls that are lighter than the wall-paper and use as many mirrors as possible. Where there is only one window, a long mirror placed on the wall opposite to it will work wonders in giving the appearance of in- creased size and space.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHAT WILL BE WORN. AT THE KING'S CORONATION. BY THE NOBILITY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

WHAT WILL BE WORN. AT THE KING'S CORONATION. BY THE NOBILITY. The Earl Marshal, the Duke of Norfolk, in view of the near approach of the Coronation festivities, has devised a plan by which peers and peeresses may be initiated into the mysteries of coronation dress. At Norfolk House, St. James, the Duke has arranged miniature wax figures dressed in the robes and regalia to be worn by virtue of the rank of baron, viscount, earl, marquis, and duke; and also figures representative of the robes, dresses, and coronets to be worn by peeresses. A Coventry-street firm recently showed a Lon- don "Express" representative some coronation robes and coronets that had been ordered for next June.   Every peer attending the Coronation must wear a crimson velvet robe lined with white taffeta and a cape furred and powdered, with rows of ermine according to their degrees. The velvet is made on hand looms for Coronation robes. The ermine collars worn by peers differ some- what from the coll...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MORE BISMARCK LETTERS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

MORE BISMARCK LETTERS. Among the interesting letters in the new vol- umes of Prince Bismarck's correspondence, says a despatch from Berlin to "The Times," are those exchanged between the Chancellor and Count Heckel von Donneremarck in regard to the proposed visit of Gambetta to Bismarck. Bismarck protested against the suggested visit, saying that it was important in the interest of peace that Gambetta's influence should be pre- served, and it would be injured by dealings with himself (Bismarck). Count von Donnersmarck still urging the ad- visability of the visit, Bismarck repeated his objections, adding that the Emperor would be frightened by closer relations between his Chan- cellor and Gambetta. In one letter Bismarck said that an Ultramon- tane Government under one of the French pre- tenders would have to make war on Germany whenever the Jesuits gave the word.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
UNTIL ASSISTANCE: ARRIVES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

UNTIL ASSISTANCE ARRIVES. When an Arabian horse finds itself wounded, and perceives that it will not be able to bear its rider much longer, it quickly retires from the conflict, carrying its master to a place of safety while it has still sufficient strength. But if the rider is wounded and falls to the ground, the faithful animal remains beside him, un- mindful of danger, neighing until assistance is brought.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A WOMAN'S PITEOUS PLIGHT. WITHOUT FOOD FOR THREE DAYS IN THE WOODS. AN ADEQUATE SENTENCE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

A WOMAN'S PITEOUS PLIGHT. WITHOUT FOOD FOR THREE DAYS IN THE WOODS. AN ADEQUATE SENTENCE. A thrilling little drama of real life was dis-   closed before Mr. Justice Grantham at the Dur- ban Assizes the other day, when Miss Mary Annie Lamb (26), the daughter of a North Riding farmer, was indicted for the wilful murder of her infant at Darlington last August. The grand jury, however, reduced the charge to one of   abandonment, to which she pleaded guilty. The pitiful tale as disclosed by counsel showed that last year Miss Lamb was serving as a bar- maid in Barrow, where she was until six months ago, when she sought obscurity in Bradford. She found herself with only enough money to pay her fare home to Brompton, but becoming alarmed at the prospect of presenting herself before strict parents with an infant, she left her baby in a field at Darlington on the way. A few days afterwards she saw constables coming to the farm, and in desperation she rushed out at th...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE VERY LATEST. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

THE VERY LATEST. Steering torpedoes by wireless telegraphy is the latest invention designed for purposes of warfare. Mr. Cecil Varicas, an inventor, firmly believes that his invention will enable an average marks- man to hit the mark nine times out of 10, with- out any attendant risk to himself. Mr. Varicas secured a patent on his invention in April, 1900, and since then has subjected it to private and public tests, with a small, specially-built launch 42in. by 27½in. At one end of a lake was set up a transmitting apparatus (such as is used in wireless telegraphy), of small power. At the other end, low in the water by reason of its batteries, was the launch, propelled at a speed of about four knots an hour by an electric motor, deriving its power from small cells. The launch contained a primitive receiver, capable of working an ordinary Morse writer at a distance of 100 yards. A short wire pro- jected from the mast. In the launch the Morse writer was replaced by a rudder-turning con...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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