ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland ... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 12,593 items from Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
12,593 results
A Soft Job. [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 1 October 1914

A Soft Job. Mr. Roosevelt was once talking to a young man about Iii'h future eareo'*. "Whai are you going to be?" he asked. "A doctor," replied the youth. "A doctor?" echoed Mr. Roosevelt. "Why have you chosen that, profes sion?" "Well, it Getais to me," wps the reply, "that a doctor's career is r:Uher a soft job, for he's the only man who gets paid whether or not his work ia successful!"

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Joseph's Programme. [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 1 October 1914

Joseph's Programme. Thi) mistress of the house is a cul tivated Oostonian of musical taste, and the whistling of the footman, who believed himself aione in tho house, fretted her artistic soul. "Joseph," she called at last from the head of the back stairs, "please •luii"t whistle those vulgar ragtime "Y''s, mom," returned Joseph, meekly; "I know, mem," he contin ued. with unexpected spirit: "but you can't expect a rhapsody of Liszt with cleaning the knives. That will come later, when I'm polishing the silver."

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A LAST RESOURCE. I [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 1 October 1914

A LAST RESOURCE. 1. Kitty Delivers glanced up ad licr msbaiui entered tho room, and, fiusli ng guiltily, pushed a piece of paper mdcr a blotter that lay on the tabic. "How early you are to-day, Paul!" ilio cried. "I didn't expect you Tor an >ther hour." Paul, whoso quick eye had at once lotected her action and noted the ris ng color in her cheeks, strode forward ind looked down on her searehingly. "What in that you have just hidden, Kitty?" he asked quietly. A look of fear leapt into the young wife's blue eyes, and instinctively she lowered hor ifds whilst toying nervous ly with an ivory paper-cutter. "Oh, nothing of importance," she murmured, evasively. "1 was only scribbling on a piece of paper." "hot me see it." Kile Hashed him aji indignant glance and, rising to her feet, picked up I lie blotter together with the paper she had hidden, and made as though to leave the room; but an arresting hand was laid on her arm. "You'll not leave this room, Kitty, until you've shown me what...

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Rank Ruffian. [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 1 October 1914

A Rank Ruffian. A newly-married man returned homo the other night to find his wife looking very sad. "What is the matter, Mary?" Jig asked. "Oh, John! I've been reading how I hose poor Yorkshiremen have been knocked about. That man I-Iobbs must be a terrible brute!" "What has he been doing?" "haven't you read it? Why, it says he started punishing them severely, lie cut Drake twice, and knocked llooth all over the field. Wilson in terfered, but was knocked to the boundary. Next Hirst tried; but ITobbs ran out and knocked liim through the pavilion clock. Rhodes can 10 on, and what do you think Ilobbs did to him? Why, be skied him. and be might have been killed, but Denton ran and caught him!" To a woman love is the bread of ' life, to a man just the jam on the ' aread.

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SHOCKS CAUSE DUMB TO SPEAK [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 1 October 1914

SHOCKS CALS= DUMB TO SPEAK The reccnt c,;se of a ycang woman in Kngland who, a.'ter being deaf and dumb for twenty-one years, is slowly recovering both hearing and spesrh— the shock of the tragic eir! o. ler brother, who drowned himself in tho Stour, being regarded as rcsoonsiblo for the miraculous example of shock succeeding where doctors have fuilod —recalls similar instances. Some time ago the narrow escape of a boy from drowning off North Shields fish quay had a remarkable sequel. While efforts weri being made to restore the apparently drowned boy to consciousness l>y means of artificial respiration, a man who had been deprived of speech two years earlier as the result of an acci dent pushed through the crowd mere ly out of curiosity. As soon as he saw the prostrate boy, although not in any way related to him, tne .sight gave him such a shock that hia speech suddenly returned an i ne f ell to the ground in a state of coiupse. Upon recovering he continue 1 to tipeak freely, an...

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
II. [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 1 October 1914

II. "Who was that man who culled just now?" It was a month later, 0110 July even ing when Kitty put the question to her husband and waited with impatient curiosity for the answer, which seem a long time in coming. "Well—er—-you shall have to know in the end," he replied, "bo I may as well toll yon that lie brought a judg ment summons for Blunt and Evans' account. 1 hud the preliminary sum mons about three weeks ago, but I took no notice of it." "Why?" breathed Kitty, her blue eyes dilating with sudden fear. "Well"—with a shrug—"what was the use? I haven't got the money, so they must do their worst." "But—but—couldn't, you have offered some on account?'' "I could have gone to court and made un offer; but"—sternly—"I have been so dragged down that at the pre sent time I could not honestly have of fered to pay live shillings a week." A vivid rush of color stained Kitty's cheeks; her eyes wavered and fell be fore the look in his. "What will they do?" she asked, in an awe-struck whisper....

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A QUICK MARRIAGE. [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 1 October 1914

A QUICK MARRIAGE. Housewives who find the servant problem a source of endless worry may find some corisolation in the fact that, in no country is the matter a perfectly simple one. Miss Evelyn Adam, in "Behind the' Screens" in Japan, describes some ot the difficul ties of keeping servants In that coun try. The maidservants are untrust worthy, but they are gentle and cheap —while they stay. Unfortunately they are fond of playing the vanishing trick upon their mistresses. - A lady in Tokio had a valuable ser vant of somewhat mature years, who rejoiced in the poetic name of "Oharu San"—the Honorable Miss Spring. One day at tea-time Miss Spring did not appear. The kitchen was deserted, the kettle was cold; half the luncheon-plates lay Immersed in a bowl of soapy water, the other half stood on the sink, ready to be put away. The next morning Oharu San reap peared, and demanded the fragment o? wages clue to her since tho begin ning of the month. The lady asked why she was leaving so sudde...

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ROUND THE WORLD FOR A WIFE [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 1 October 1914

F'.OUND THE WORLD FOR A WIFE Car'ned in the picturesque dra:?s of liis native country, Demetre Daitn, a Knumanian, twenty-three years of age, is walking around the world in order to win a bride. Incidentally, he also seeks to win r. wager of £4000 by covering G3i)0 miles on foot within six years. He styles himself the "globe-trot t i 11 .U' Roumanian artist-dancer." lie fought in the Halkan War, and is proud of the fact. After he has com pleted the arduous task he Iirb set himself, he wishes to claim a bnle among the hills of Uoumania and set tle down in London—with his wife and the £4000. ilis life at present is not quite so pleasant as his dreams of the future. Although he claims to be expert in the use of five languages, he is com pelled to sell post-cards as a means of livelihood. Often he is treated ' with scant courtesy—a fact which may be due to his inability to speak English. lie confesses he is homesick, but he means to "keep on keeping on," for the sake of the £4000 and th...

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Boating Fatality. IN CORNER INLET. FISHERMEN AND SON LOST. PIECES OF BOAT FOUND IN BENTLY HARBOR. [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 1 October 1914

Boating Fatality. IN CORNER INLET. :o: FISHERMEN AND SON LOST. PIECES OF BOAT FOUND IN BENTLY HARBOR. The rough weather that prevailed last week was responsible for the loss of two lives in Corner Inlet. On Wednesday, last several boats put out from Port Welshpool, bound for the fishing grounds outside the entrance. A violent storm from the north-west set in, when the boats were off Five Mile Beach, which compelled them to seek shelter' inside. The four boats were manned by Andrew Matt son, Alex.. Goulden, Fred Furniss and Frank Morris. In Goulden's boat was Morris' adopted son, a lit tle chap nine or ten years of age. The boats arrived safeJy inside the entrance, and towards evening were made as snug as possible under the lea of Entrance Point, waiting for a chance fo return to Port Welshpool. . Alex. Goulden, before casting anchor, sailed over to Frank Morris* boat, jyid put aboard the boy. - The boats lay at anchor about 50 yards apart, one behinds the other, in a fairly sheltere...

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE MIRROR. WITH WHICH IS INCORPORATED THE SOUTH GIPPSLAND SHIRE MAIL. THURSDAY, OCT. 1. 1914. [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 1 October 1914

THE MIRROR. W1TII WHICH IS INt'oltl'OKATKI) THE SOl'TH (ill'l'SI,ANl) S1IIUB MAIL. THURSDAY. OUT. 1. 19U. "Melbourne Punch," commenting on the Patriotic Funds in Victoria, says it cannot be said that the money is coming in with a velocity highly creditable to Victoria. The Lord Mayor's Fund amounts to a little over £100,000, which, for a rich country like Victoria, is not at all gratifying, and for a cause such as the land has never encountered be fore and is not likely to encounter again for generations. There are two delinquents—the very . rich and the comparatively poor. For the latter there aro excuses, but not so for the very rich, who should bear in mind that the fight being fought is more in iboir interests than of any other class. There has not been an individual contribution that has ap proached munificence, and we are forced to *he conclusion that muni ficence is not a characteristic of the "bei.stlv rich." It has been stated from time to time that wombat:; are very numer ...

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FALL OF THE CARDS. [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 8 October 1914

FALL OF THE CARDS. When Ennerdale rose to depart with the last batch of guests, Johnson laid a hand oil his shoulder and said in an undertone—■ "Don't go yet; I've something to say to you." The two men looked at one another. Piercing interrogation coupled with slight inquietude was expressed in Eu uordale's facc. lie hesitated; the.i his white teeth showed in a faint, hail' disdainful smile, and he nodded assent. The clashing of the garden gate and tlie Bound of the hall door elosin:; were followed by .Mrs. Johnson's reap pearance. She Muttered into the room, (lushed and radiant. Tile two men were standing by the window, which had been tlung open to admit the cool night air. Johnson leaned against the frame and ga::ed out into the darkness. "There, thank goodness, they're nil gone!" she said, with a little sigh of relief. "Your guests would scarcely fe-;l themselves complimented if the*' heard you," 3aid Ennerdale in hi.; grave fashion. "Probably not, but (lie boredom of entertainin...

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Inside the Desk. [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 8 October 1914

Inside the Deck. I was not married long before I dis covered thnt my wife wats biessod with the ordinary amount of woman's curiosity. One day, while 1 was out, she em braced the opportunity to pick the lock of my desk. I do not know what she expected to find, but I think she must have 'been disappointed to dis cover that it was full of nothing b it biscuits. When I came home in the evening she said, "George, wli.it !ir the meaning of all those biscuits that I saw in your desk to-day?" I replied: "Well, we're married now, so I may af well tell you the truth. When we were courting, when ever 1 told you a lie (which was some times necessary) I made a mental note of it. And when 1 went home I would throw a biscuit into my desk. One biscuit per lie. If, during the (lay or during the evening, 1 told you hilif a-dozen lies, I threw in hnlf-a-do/.en biscuits. So these biscuits simply re present the number of lies I have told von during our courtship. She said: "Well, my goodness! If 1 had o...

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
OLD SHOES FOR LUCK. [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 8 October 1914

OLD SHOES FOR LUCK. Few people are aware of the origin of the old custom of throwing shoes after a newly married couple. Many people are under the impression that it is done 'for luck," whereas it is merely a corruption* of a very old pro ceeding, when the bride's father used to hand over a shoe to the bridegroom as a sign that he gave him full posses sion of his daughter. From all lime shoes have denote;! possession—as the. old expression of "stepping into liis shoes" shows. When a Bedouin chief is dying, one of his last acts is to hand over to his eldest son, or whoever liis heir may be, his shoes as a token of his. taking his place. in many Eastern cities a pair of shoes placed outside a shut door mean that no one dare enter, and in Benares if a woman wishes to turn her atten tion from her market hag for a mo ment, she makes sure that it will he untouched by leaving her shoes by it. Even in the Hible the shoe is used ns a symbol of possession, for Ruth's relative handed over a sh...

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE HOUR OF DEATH. [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 8 October 1914

THE HOUR OF DEATH. Most people -will tell you that more persons die between the hours of mid night and five in the-morning than at any other time, but this is a great mis take, though one which is.believed in by doctors as well as the general pub lic. Recently, in one of the big hospi tals, statistics were collected of the hour at which patients died. It ther<3 had been any truth in the generally accepted belief that most people die In the early hours these statistics would have shown it, for the deaths of no fewer than 15,000 patients were re corded. It was found, indeed, that more peo ple died between six in the mornlm.; and six at night than during the othev twelve liourB of the day. Again, from two to six in the afternoon there were sixty-six more deaths than' from two to six in the morning. In the cases of people Buffering from chronic diseases the greatest number died nt four o'clock in the afternoon, closely followed by two aud fire in the itftornoon. .Six o'clock ...

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ON THE L. [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 8 October 1914

. *— — ■ ■ ■ " II ON THE L. By W. B. BLAKE. 7 Riding down-town on the elevated train/Jerome felt more sharply than evier how like one day was to another. ' The alarm clock awakened him—i£ not his own, then the next door lod ger's, that went off twenty minutes .before. He knew the voice of his neighbor's clock—but not his vox hu mana. After the alarm clock and dressing, and a snatch of breakfast in his room, it was a plunge into the streets. They were cold and grey in winter, those streets; in summer, tepid, stale. After wards, the elevated railway for forty minutes befoie he reached the whole sale paper house where he was one of a dozen clerks—at the bottom of the proverbial ladder. When he had "nailed" that position how big the salary looked to him! Not only its inelasticity was impressive. By scrap ing, he just saved four dollars a week. Save he did, however, as every lonely man in a great city must try to do. Such as he find life in the maelstrom too terrifying and too unfriendly...

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE CHILDREN. [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 8 October 1914

THE CHILDREN. !;>• methodical and consistent in your habits :in11 in training your children. lie jiu;t when correct iili: them and 1m> quite certain of the offence before you scoid. J Chastise when really nl-cessary, and don't do so in a half-hearted way. Let your children see that you lovo '■ them. l>e strict or they will trample on you. Teaeh them to he honorable and chivalrous in their play aiul they will lie so later in earnest. Be loving and strict rather thaa : lovinK and foolish; above all be wis#.

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Family Notices [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 8 October 1914

Bereavement Notice, I V| II. A: "MRS. THuHSON & FAMILY ^ to return : heir sincere thanks h< their- f»;<»r»<!s who h?ul shown such cor ilinl syinpHthy wit 11 them in th*mr lecent a;ill iKMoriVLMIIt'Mt. 1»V tl ■ »T >* J tlil)Ut»H, tetters, ami c»r:ls »f cnudoU-nce, oic.;j; also to ihu k IV. Wilson nnrt Mp.^daim^ I L'-.y for their kiml iitteiitiinj :ind syin- J pntliy

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TO MY MOTHER. [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 8 October 1914

TO MY MOTHER. IV:!] gently with her. Time; theas ;11;11 y years Of life havf lirought more smiles with [iieiji liiaii [o.'irs, Lay not ihy hand too harshly on her now, rntee decline so .-'lowly on her brow That (like ii sunset 01 ;>. northern clime. Where tv.iiight linger.-; in the summer time, Ami lades al I:i^f into the silent night, Kro one mav note the. passing of tho lighl) So may she pass—since 'tU tho com mon lot—• As one who, resting, sleeps und knows it not.

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE MIRROR. WITH WHICH IS INCORPORATED THE SOUTH GIPPSLAND SHIRE MAIL. THURSDAY, OCT. 8, 1914. [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 8 October 1914

THE MIRROR. WITH WIUI.'II I * 1 N ('< 'HI'i>H A'J'K 1> 'I'll K sol T!1 iJiri-Sl.ANP (illlltK MAIL. 'i jiui'iSDay, out. s. r.n i. After a strenuous day's drill and :i:111o 1 on Friday Inst by the troops in .'.•imp lit 1 li oadnieadows tlicy were liealed lo a line colleen programme in the evening': ;u ranged by Mrs. .1. A. I'anicll, of Foster, and oilier leading artists. I'll;1 Y.M.O.A's. larg-Miianpiee was utilised for the occasion and Ui; ■iides being ;:tijwdi'd inside (.it.* soldieis Wi'rr six deep nil round the tent. Tile singing of th:it. favoui iie song '• Bonny Prince Charlie, ' by Mis. Daniell merited high approbating, the singer having to respond to an encore. Tlw camp motio " Thn e cheers for tin broad, j-un ami stew," was also en thusiastically rehearsed by the crowd when -Mis. Daniell rendered the ap piopriate anil amusing ditty "My Little .Januny-Facii." TIid secretary of the Foster Progress Association {Mr. R Fisher) bus re ceived the following intimatio...

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE BANANA AS A FOOD. [Newspaper Article] — Foster Mirror and South Gippsland Shire Advocate — 8 October 1914

THE BANANA AS A FOOD. The banana is a complete food. Ath leies have lived on tlieni entirely with out loss o£ strength. They must be properly ripened before use. A3 a rule, they are eaten too green. They are best ripened on the tree but It way be done artificially. Chittenden gives their composition as 22.6 per cent, energy and fat producing, and 1.8 per cent, tissue formic.: elements, with 75 per cent, water. Thus is it not only a perfectly balanced food, but it contains more muscle and bono producing substance than any other fruit. A green- or yellow banana is "not fit to be eaten under any circum stances; but should be kept till tha -skin is blackened. Sometimes the fruit is picked too green; when this is so, or when they have not ripened properly, they have a:dark, solid sub ■ stance in the centre. To ripen so that the best will be got from the Iruit, buy a bunch or a number attached ta the Btem, cut off a thin section from the lower part o£ the stem, and place in water, to enab...

Publication Title: Foster Mirror And South Gippsland Shire Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
x
Loading...
x
x