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Title: Illinois Farmer Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 4,057 items from Illinois Farmer, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Essay on Health . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1856

Essay on Health . THE DECLINE OF HEALTH . We doubt uot that mein in his primitive condition was perfect in bodily functions and perfect in health . He lived in and enjoyed a physical Eden , in the sense that all his physical powers acted in harmonious concert . ^ - Then life and full measure of sweets was enjoyed . Disease and pain were unknown . — In . the early periods of our race our fathers lived through centuries in the enjoyment of health . Age crept slowly on . Five , six , < seyenand eight hundred years were the common age of man . Children outlived their fathers . The earth then held no infant grave . We read of no disease , no medical profession , of no . hospitals , of no epidemics , of no universal panaceas ; for the people were all well . Health flowed in all their veins . — - But as mind grewin power , passion augmented its strength , evil concupiscence poured its tides of visciousness among the people , ; dis ease crept m and increased in form and vh &a...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
A Horse with the Heaves . j [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1856

A Horse with the Heaves . j I tried all sorts of heave powders on my patient , with no effect whatever . It is said that in a limestone couutry this disease is unknown , and lime water was prescribed with no apparent advantage . Some one told me to give the horse ginger , and strange to tell , I found that a tablespoonful of ginger given to the General with his oats would cure him for the day , in half an hour after he had eaten it ; but on giving it daily the effect soon ceased . It is a jockey s remedy and will last long enough to swap upon . Finally I was advised to cut my horses fodder and g ive it always wet . I pursued that course carefully , keeping the General tied with so short a halter that he could not eat his bedding , giving him chopped hay and meal three times a day , and never more than a bucket of water at a time . He improved rapidly . I have kept him five years , making him a factotum—carriage horse , saddle horse , plow and cart horse—and he bids fair to remain us...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Droughts—Whither are we Tending . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1856

Droughts—Whither are we Tending . The destruction of our forests , a dsstruction which has been going on-now ever since the settlement of the country , and which has been remarkably rapid in the West for the last fifty years , is producing the following results , which must be very obvious to every observant person . The surface of the earth is more exposed to the drying winds , and to the beams of our sun > mer sun . These causes quicken • the drying of the soils . The sources of many a well and stream are dried by the removal of trees from slopes and hills , from whose bosoms they once drew a permaneotsupply oi water . Par less rain falls on the earth during the summer months than would fall if the earth was more generally shaded with trees . Wide forests attract showers . Many a forest enjoys a generous rain , when the wide , open plain is scorched with drought . Forests act as do streams , to direct the courses of showers , and concentrate them upon their own area . P...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
¦ Fall treatment of Asparagus . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1856

¦ Fall treatment of Asparagus . - As soon ; as the heavy frosts come tokillthe Cops , theyishprild be cut and removed to-the stye or to the compost heap , Tie surface of the bed which vba 8 ; become- hard and .. perhaps , weedy—8 houldbe ; thorottgh ! y 8 ea , rified with the hoe , or forked over , taking care not to injure thecrowns . About the last of the month ? - spread on a-heavy coating of stable manure , at least a half Cord to every two rods square .- The rains will carry down its fertilizing propertses tor the roots , and give them great strength and vigor for an oarly start in the spring . If r near the shore , where margh mud is accessible , a coating of this , one inch thick , in addition to the manure ,, wilt . < io good service . We have : alsb found it anexcellent plan to cover the beds With sea-weed or old hay during the winter . The roots keep active , longer before the ground closes up ; the ground does not freeze so / deep , and starts sooner in the spr...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Packing Eggs for Winter Use . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1856

Packing Eggs for Winter Use . About Christmas eggs are very searce , and consequently high .- With little- care in the summer when they are abundant ; they may be put up so as to keep sound and fresh until anew sup ply can be had in the spring . One of the best ways we have tried for packing eggs so as to keep them long , is to pack them in charcoal dust , in boxes , by setting them on end ; put the boxes in a cool , dry place , and turn them over gotten as once in two days . Put the boxes in aome place where they are sureto be seen ; or they will be forgotten and the turning neglected . Another plan , requiring less attention , and may-answer just as well , is to pack the eggs in Isrge earthen jars and fill them with lime-water , made by pour ihg water on quick lime , and letting , it stand a day-or two covered . The finer particles of the lime which run off with the water is deposited upon the shells of the eggs , and fills the pores and keeps the eggs periectly-sweet for , a long...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
The Horse . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1856

The Horse . Hon . Zedock Pratt , in a lecture -on the Horse , g ives some valuable hints and suggestions . POINTS OF A GOOD rBORSKHe should be about fifteen anda . half hands high ; the head and neck clean made ; wide between the nostrils , and tbei nostrils tfien £ selves large , transparent and open ; broad in the forehead ; eyes prominent , clear and sparkling ; ears small , neatly set on ; neck rather short and well set up ; large arm or shoulders , well throw back , and high ; withers arched and high ; legs fine , flat , thin and small boned ; body round and rather light , though sufficiently large to afford substance when it is needed ; full chest affording play for the lungs ; back short with the hind quarters set on rather obliquely . Any one possessing a horse of this make and appearance , and weighing eleven or twelve hundred pounds , may rest assured he has a horse of all work , and a bargain well worth getting hold of . CABE OP HORSES . — No horse can endure labor all th...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Fruit Trees—What Becomes of them ? [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1856

Fruit Trees—What Becomes of them ? At the recent Fruit Grower s Meeting- in Western New York , the question was raised : What becomes of all the trees that are propagated and sold in the nurseries of that section ? The opinion of the meeting , as expressed in th « discussion , was , that although many trees were lost and worthless from improper treatmant in the nursery , and many from damage sustained in transportation , yet more were lost by unskillful planting , and neglect afterwards , than from any and all ether causes combined . This , I believe to be the case . In all my observations of travel , I thinkl can safely say that I have not seen one orchard or one garden in a hundred even tolerably managed . By far the greater number look as though the proprietor had abandoned his trees to ruin . . Blown over to one side , anchored in a tough grass sod , buried up in groves of corn-stalks , torn and broken by cattle , barked and bruised by the plough , pruned with an axe—thus they p...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Boys and Girls at School Together , [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1856

Boys and Girls at School Together , Mrs . Jameson , in her Common Place Book of Thoughts , Memories and Fancies , says : I am convinced from my own recollections , and from all I have learned from experienced teachers in large shools , that one of the most fatal mistakes in the training of children has been the early separation of the sexes . I say has been , because I find that everywhere this most dangerous prejudice has been giving way before the light of truth and a more genial acquaintance with that primal law of nature , which ought to teach us that the more we can assimilate on a large scale the public to the domestic training , the better for all . There exists still the expression—in the hi gher classes especially , that in early education , the mixture of the two sexes would tend to make the girl masculine , and the boys effeminate , but experience shows that it is all the other way . Boys learn a manly and protecting tenderness , and girls become at once moire feminine an...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1856

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS To male Hens lay in Winter . MESSRS . EDITORS : AS we are social beings , let us talk about poultry afew moments . Now to Hiy caption . First make ahbuseiJby 10 feet—a 16 light window on the South side , a double door on the west , ventilator eight inches square , in the top , let it run up 2 $ feet above the ridge board . Line the inside ol the room with boards , leaving a space of four inches ,,, fill the space with sawdust and tanbarki Let the room be 6 feet between joints ; lath , plaster and whitewash it . Bank it up on the outside f 6 ur feet high with horse manure . Now you havfe a room that will not freeze . This roj > m is sufficiently large for 25 hens and 1 cock . Place in a corner , a box 6 feet long , 1 foot sauare , with 5 partitions for nests . Place the box on the end ; let the front be open except a four inch protection to each nest . Let the roosts be in the shape of a ladder . Your house is finished . Keep 2 inches of sand upon the f...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
To PREVENT Cows FBOM HOLDING VP THKIB [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1856

To PREVENT Cows FBOM HOLDING VP THKIB MILK . —One of the best methods to prevent cows from holding up their milk , is to feed them at the time of milking . If this is done they will give down their milk freely . But if you neglect to feet them they will hold it up so that it is almost impossible to get any from them . Try the experiment of feeding them at milking . SCRATCHES IN HOBSES . — It is said that this often troublesome disease , unless very bad , may be cured by washing thoroughly with soap suds , and then tubbing with lard fried outof salt meat Keep clean and wash and grease every other day until a cure is effected . Leaning mud to dry upon the legs of a horse is one great cause of this disease , and many horses are in ? ured by want of care and cleanliness wen driven in muddy weather ;

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Hasty Pudding—How to make it . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1856

Hasty Pudding—How to make it . Corn meal . should always be coarsely ground . The finest meal Should be as coarse grained as mustard seed . Fresh corn should be ground at least as often as once in three our four weeks . — The meal should be kept in a dry cool room . — Second : Our favorite mush ia not a very hasty padding . It is made thus : For two quarts 1 of pudding put three quarts of water and one tablespoonful of salt into a kettle and heat it until it is quite warm . Then take out one quart of water and stir into it Indian meal enough to make a thick batter , so thick that it will scarcely run . Work it over with the ladle or wooden spoon until not the smallest lump remains , and then return it to the kettle where the other two quarts of water will by this time be boiling rapidly . It must now be kept boiling briskly with constant stirring , for not less than twenty minutes , and , until it hss boiled down so much as to be hard to stir . Nothing but constant stirring from the...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
A Horticultural Hint [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1856

A Horticultural Hint Every year witnesses great , improvements in the . cultivation of all kinds of fruit , and we are glad to perceive that there are thousands of intelligent farmers in all sections of the country , who manifest some degree of interest in this matter , and are beginning to realize that few subjects are more worthy of their attention . Still , it must be confessed that good cultivation is the exception , and an unprofitable and shameful neglect the rule , among the generality of fruit growers . How many trees are planted every year in grain or in grass l and left to wither and to die ? How many are planted without judicious pruning , without due preparation of the • oil , without mulching , or that cultivation of the land which is necessary to insure the vigorous growth of all the superior kinds of fruit trees ? We have met with individuals who appear to think that the best way to secure good fruit , is to allow the trees to take ^ their natural growth . This is a ^...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Remedy for Borers . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1856

Remedy for Borers . Mr . N . S . Smith , of Buffalo , says , in the Ce-untry Gentleman , that he has found the following an effectual remedy for the borer : Make a mound of soft earth around the root , rising about six inches above where the borers are at work . Then saturate this mound with a strong brine made out of common salt . Make the application twice within four weeks , any time when the ground is not frozen . Old pork or beef brine is just the thing . Mr . Smith says the brine is taken up by the tree and thus destroys the insects . He adds that it should be applied cautiously to young trees .

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Stopping [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1856

Stopping Pinching off the end of a shoot or branch is called stopping , in gardener s phrase , because , the , growth of the shoot is arrested or stopped in that direction . It is often done unwisely , and with injury to the crop or tree . Sometimes weeds are pulled up when there is sap enough in them to mature all their seeds . If the person was experienced , he would remove the entire weed , root and branch , and a harvest of weed-seeds w ^ ould be avoided . Many people have the benevolent but rather officious habit of pulling up weeds , when walking in a neighbor s garden . It would be better to leave this matter for him or his gardener . The work would probably be better done , and certainly more to the taste of the parties concernr ed . It is not always best to see a weed in a neighbor s garden . [—Horticulturist .

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Boot Grafting Roses . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1856

Boot Grafting Roses . This has been done in England for a long time , and in this country for the last ten years , by Mr . Weston , of Ash wood , Tenn . He describes the manner substantially as follows : Take the root of any hardy variety , from a quarter of an inch to an inch through and cut it into pieces of six inches long . — Rub the thorn from the scion with the back of the knife , as far as the bandages will extend . Make the cut on the root two inches and a half long , and the cut on the scion to correspond . As early as possible plant the grafted roots , in two rows , two feet apart . ; the plants one foot apart in the rows . Plant the roots firmly . Leave only one or two eyes of the scion above ground . When the buds begin to push , loosen the soil with a hoe . — Pinch out all the flower buds as they appear . Pinch back the shoots when they are about eight inches long . Mr . M . says he has been quite successful in this mode . The kinds that make the stoutest wood do best b...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Beet Root Coffee . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1856

Beet Root Coffee . A very good coffee can be made of beet root in the following manner . Cut dry beet root into very small pieces , then gradually heat it in a close pan over the fire for about fifteen minutes ; Now introduce a little sweet fresh butter and bring it up to the roasting • heat- The butter prevents the evaporation of the sweetness and aroma of the beet root , and when fully roasted it is taken out , ground and used like coffee . A beverage made of it is cheap , and no doubt equally as good for for the human system as coffee or chickory . [ Sci . American .

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
The Next Volume [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1856

The Next Volume The first volume of the ILLINOIS FARMER is drawing to a close . It has beenpublished under some disadvantages , which will hereafter be avoided . The next volume will be improved in typographical appearance , and it is designed to embrace illustrations which maybe of service to its readers . We are indebted to many individuals for the interest they have taken in this publication . We hope it has been of some service to them and the public . We aim to make it a practical work , which every reader may understand , and especially design it for farmers and laboring men of Illinois- — Eastern agricultural periodicals , although conducted with distinguished ability , are not suited to the agriculture of the West . We are impressed , too , with the belief that there should be published a paper devoted to agriculture in Central Illinois , and that it should be presented at a cost that will enable every farmer to subscribe for it , and in a form that will allow of its conveni...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Poultry—Does it Pay ? [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1856

Poultry—Does it Pay ? Within a few years there has been a poultry mania over most of the country . Much money has been spent in procuring and propagating divers varieties of the dunghill fowl . The great Chinese fowl , which in our younger days was considered merely as a curiosity —unworthy of raising as an article of profit , jp late years has obtained a high reputation , which it is hardly entitled to . In cities and towns , and the country , where feed is scarce and high , such is their inordinate appetites and the immense quantities of food they devour , that they will not pay the cost of keeping and the care bestowed upon them . They may be kept for fancy , in order to see what monstrous birds can be raised , and as things of curiosity , but they will not pay , so far as dollars and cents are concerned . In the country , such a country as ours , where there is plenty of food constantly going to waste , there may be some reasons in favor o ^ rearing the large Chinese fowls . Whi...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
The Wheat Crop in Kentucky . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1856

The Wheat Crop in Kentucky . The Western Farm Journal , a monthly paper published in Louisville , Ky ., hask statistical article which shows a great falling off in the production of wheat in that State , The figures stand as follows : Product of 1840 4 , 803 , 152 bushels . - Product of 1850 2 , 142 , 330 buheto . Decrease in ttn years 2 , 661 , 822 bnshsls . The writer furnishes figures to show that Kentnckyhad 909 , 199 bushels of wheat for sale in the year 1840 , and 2 , 750 , 134 bushels to buy in the year 1850 ! The sum of these two quantities is 3 , 660 , 533 bushels , which at $ 1 per bushel , is the exact difference in the money value of her wheat crop , to Kentucky , between the year 1840 and the year 1850 . A decrease of three and a half millions per year , in the value of the most important element that goes intothe production of the breadstuff s of the world , is certainly , not a very encouraging picture for any State .

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
Emigration . [Newspaper Article] — Illinois Farmer — 1 November 1856

Emigration . Ton have spoken of the richpraries of the West ; but can you fancy the dull monotonous employment of sowing and harvesting grain always upon a dull , monotonous level surface , out of which the sun rises gloomily in the morning , and into which he sinks in selitary sadness at evening , staring with his great whiteeye all day ; his glorious light undivided , unvaried by the beautiful prisms of nature that everywhere surround you here ; the mountain , the forest , the vale , the river , the cloud ; violet , indigo , blue green , yellow , orange , red , and all the variety of their combinations . Heje can you realize the sublimity of the simple though wondrous words , God said let theie be light , and there was light , Are you sure you will not find among the strangers you meet there , the trace of numerous and fatal diseases ? Will you not burn with fever and shudder with ague ? Is it a pleas ant thing to pass through the purgatory of acclimation ? Do you believe that the...

Publication Title: Illinois Farmer
Source: Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections (UIUC)
Country/State of Publication: Illinois, United States
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