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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1897

MS& THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 37 A WORTHY CHARITY. Wo doubt if there are a dozen people in this county outside of those in some way connected with the work who realize to what an extent the Catholic school for Indian children at Harbor Springs has grown, and what a mag nificent and deserving charity it is. The editor had the pleasuro the other day of being shown through the school by the Father Superior, Rev. Fr. Zeph eryn Englehardt, whom we found a scholarly and courteous gentleman, and we were surprised at what the Brothers of the Order of St. Francis, and the sisters who have assisted in the work, have accomplished 'for the unfortunate Indian children of Northern Michigan. The first thing that struck our atten tion was the politeness of the boys and girls of the school; for in manners, at least, the pupils of none of our public schools can compare with these chil dren who had almost "run wild'' until taken into this school. In the school rooms we tound every indication that the c...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1897

w-Wvrr "S t 'jf wi"jfnrTiii's"'!ii,"yiyi 38 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. rr ' 6 "1, Is jtST. ELIZABETH'S CONVENT, Purcell, Indian Territory. On an eminence overlooking the city and the turbulent, treacherous Canadian river,St. Elizabeth's Convent proudly stands a magnificent monument to the noble generosity of Rev. Mother Cath erine 'Drexel, and the unbounded zeal of the sejf-sacrificing daughters of St. Francis. x abandoned portions of Christ's flock. But no less merit for the success of the enterprise attaches to the humble Franciscan Sisters, who so faithfully co-operate with Mother Cath erine. Since their arrival at Purcell, in 1887, their sweet patience has met innumerable trials and difficulties, but Sisters and pupils of St. Elizabeth's academy. The institution was founded in 1887 through the munificence of Miss Drexel, whose magnanimous devotion to the cause of the poor Indian is known and admired, not only throughout our coun try, but also in other lands, bright with similar exampl...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1897

iyWyi&tyy mwqy yypwff 'wy;fpwr - THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 39 watomies, Kickapoos, Cherokees, Chey ennes and Arapahoes are all found enrolled among their pupilsTT The number of applicants' annually seeking admission taxes to the utmost the capacity oven of this spacious in stitution, while many are necessarily refused for want of room, there being at present sixty-five boarders and forty two day scholars. An excellent day school attached, and under the super vision of one of the Sisters, affords educational advantages for thirty-five boys. The convent might be styled ideal as to the salubrity and picturesqueness of its location, while the substantial quad rangular structure of the building, in which solidity rather than architec tural display was evidently sought, creates a no less favorable impression. The interior appurtenances are those of a modern, first-class academy, in The Chapel, St. Elizabeth's GOiWENT. which nothing is wanting to contribute to the comfort of the pupils and ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1897

r 'iw 'JiiJJ?T,Sf'?55 40 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. painting in oil after Murillo's famous Immaculate Conception; and on either side, the scene of "Man's Redemp tion,' ' and our Lord revealing " the Heart which so loved men " to Blessed Margaret Mary all executed in the highest style of artistic taste, and last ing tributes as well to the superior skill of the Sister artist as to the spirit which the daily (almost hourly) feast ing of their eyes on these heavenly sub jects will inculcate in the young and susceptible hearts of those whose thrice blessed fortune it is to assemble before this tabernacle of His love. " Long, long will the heart with these memories be filled" the memory of those peaceful, happy days spent under the same roof with the Divine Guest; the holy joy of those hours passed before the image of the Sacred Heart; those hymns of prayer and praise, which gushed forth from those young hearts aglow with fervor for her whose children they promised ever to be, when on that fes...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1897

w W WPVy"" i ' Myelin j. ,y nijimiiMni THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 41 Itye Indian XdVocatc Is a Quarterly Review, published by the Benedictine Fathers of the Indian Tor., to plead the causo of the last remnants of Indian tribes, and to give a history of their progress toward civilization. It will contain, irom time to time, a general history of each tribe; their progress in education and religion; their occupa tions, industries, schools, etc., etc. Also, n history of our mis sions, statistics, and other interesting matter that can not bo found in any other publication. The proceeds of this Review will bo used for educating and converting tho Indians of the Territory. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE, 8acred Heart P. O., Okla. Ter. ArrnovED by Right Rev. TIIEO. MEERSCHAERT, Vicau Apostolic of Oklahoma and Indian Temutoiiy. A Quarterly Roviow, entered at tho Sacred Heart Post Oflico in Oklahoma Territory, as second-class mattor. Subscriptions 50 Cents per Year. Single Copies 15 Cents. APRIL, 1897. Local ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1897

42 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. When a gentleman (?) speaks coarse ly, he has dressed himself clean to no purpose. The clothing of our minds certainly ought to be regarded before that of our bodies. To betray in a man's talk a corrupt imagination, is a much greater offense against gentle manly dignity than any negligence of dress imaginable. Mirth is' God's medicine. Every body ought to bathe in it. Grim care, moroseness, anxiety all this rust of life ought to be scoured off by the oil of mirth. It is better than emery. Ever' man ought to rub himself with it. A man without mirth is like a wagon without springs, in which one is caused disagreeably to jolt by every pebble over which it runs. On January 10th, ult., Rt. Rev. Theo phile Meerschaert, Vicar Apostolic of Indian Territory, conferred the holy order of deaconship on Rev. D. Pla cidus, 0 S.B., and Rev. D. Elias, 0. S.B., both members of the Benedictine Abbey of Sacred Heart. At the same time he also raised to the subdeaconate D. Joachi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1897

; -'Ajw'iKiw t ft iMf1"? agsw"'-' 'yBynjpwiHJ,!' y'm'jwif 'm-'j'" Hfytpw"M'',"'yi''i''y''',i'i'''"'- "t'wiyypiwu jiiy.jiii,(iiinii THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 43 A writer in a California paper makes the suggestion that eve'ry Catholic school child bo asked to contribute two cents a month for the Indian schools. This, it is maintained, would bring the figures in a year to $50,000, a sum suf ficient to maintain those necessary in stitutions. MISCELLANEOUS. Not satisfied to retire from the field after its many reverses during the past few months, the A. P. A. has courted another rebuff. Because a Catholic had been "slated" for Speaker of the New York Legislative Assembly, the order began a fight against his selection. Nevertheless, he has been honored with the unanimous vote of his party, and has been elected in consequence. Why don't the conspirators give up interfer ing in American politics and go homo to Canada. . -Standard and Times In this country Catholicity is not tolerated it is free....

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1897

'fy"J !f ' 44 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. IT CAN NOT BE. It can not be that be who made This wondrou? world for our delight Designed that all its charms should fade, And pass forever from our sight ; That all shall wither and decay, And know on earth no life but this, With only one finite survey Of all its beauty and its bliss. It can not be that all the years C toil and care and grief we live, Shall find no recompense but tears, No sweet return that earth can give ; That all that leads us to aspire, And struggle onward to achieve, With every unattained desire Was given only to deceive. It can not be that after all The mighty conquests of the mind, Our thoughts shall pass beyond recall, And leave no record here behind ; That all our dreams of love and fame, And hopes that time has swept away All that enthralled this mortal frame Shall not return some other day. It can not be that all the ties Of kindred souls and loving hearts Are broken when this body dies, And the immortal mind departs ;...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1897

w?lpwlfll ''WPffWlP yr- THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 45 . Do What You Undertake. 'Tis well to plan with thoughtfulness, Witli prudence, and with care; To look before you leap, my friend, Nor rashly do and dare ; But when your mind is once made up, With honor wide awake, And duty pointing out the way, Do wlutt you undertake. Ne'er let your friends and neighbors say, "There goes the man whose mind Is like the shifting weather-cock, Or like the changing wind. He goes a distance on his way, Then takes another tack, And just as likely, ere high noon, You find him trudging back." Such pilgrims seldom find the goal Remember that, my man They lead a circling, tread-mill life, However much they plan. Then, oh! my lad, start out aright, For truth and honor's sake, And toiling with right willing hands, Do what you undertake. Put your young shoulder to the wheel, And scout at craven fear; Your grandsire trod a thornier path His way to pioneer; And as his blood runs in your veins Reflect upon his ways, ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1897

46 T&E I&klAtt ADVOCATE. he sustains in a treatise called the "Origin of the Indians in the New World," which was published at Va lencia in 1607. A still bolder writer on the subject was Father Acosta, a Span ish Jesuit, who is not inclined to think that the first comers reached America by way of the sea, inasmuch as no an cient author has mentioned a mariner's compass, without the aid of which he holds a long sea voyage could not be made. The route taken, according to Acosta, must have been by the north of Asia or the north of Europe, or by the regions lying to the southward of the Straits of Magellan. The learned Jesuit admits, however, that by stress of weather vessels may have been thrown on the American coast, and mentions as a well-authenticated fact the story of a pilot who was driven by a tempest on the Brazils, and' at his death left his memoirs to Christopher Columbus. Be this as it may, the great Italian historian, Muratoria, has clearly proved that Brazilian wood...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1897

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 47 settled by the Norwegians. These, he says, came into America by way of Ice land, Greenland, Estotiland and Nor embega. Ages after the coming of the Norwegians, he asserts that the Danes, Swedes and other German nations sent out colonies to the New World. Grotius rejects the Tartar or Scythian origin of the Americans, as there is nothing similar in their customs and manners to those of the Indians. He insists chiefly on the fact that the Americans had no horses, while the Scythians not only had them, but could not do with out them. In claiming that the first settlers of America were Norwegians, who came here by the way of Iceland and Greenland, Grotius fell into an anachronism which has been adopted by many careless writers and lecturers in our own day, but which a more faith ful study of the early landmarks of his tory would correct. The learned his torian, Angrimus Jonas, himself an Ice lander, affirms that Greenland was first discovered in 964. But Gomera a...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1897

WBSS&smmmmm 48 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. foction necessary for the design which God had formed of peopling the whole world. Nature opposed no barriers which could not be surmounted. From the coast of Africa to Brazil, from the Canaries to the Western Islands, from the Western Islands to the Antilles, and again, from the British Isles and the coast of France to Newfoundland, the passage is neither long nor difficult. Neither is it long or difficult from China to Japan, from Japan and the Philip pines to the Mariana Islands, and thence to Mexico and California. What wonder, then, that Columbus found people in the New World? Surely the grandsons of Noah, when, in con formity with the designs of Providence, they were dispersed over the whole earth, could not have been restrained by any absolute impossibility of peo pling over one-third of the entire globe? If history is silent concerning the way a thing has happened, and the disquisitions of the learned are full of doubts and contradicti...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1897

mmmmmmmmmmmm THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 49 able to suppose that Noah did not com municate to those of his descendants who survived him, and by whose means he was to oxecuto the order of the great Creator to people the universe, a knowl edge of the art of navigation? Nay, it is not absolutely certain that America was uninhabited before the deluge. Moses informs us that all the earth, even the remotest continents and is lands, was once peopled. With these evidences before him, he is a bold man who declares that the art of navigation was unknown among the first founders of nations. On account of the barbarism of the American Indians, we are destitute of historical monuments to trace their origin. There is nothing left but the primitive languages capable of throw ing any light upon the clouds of im penetrable darkness which surround their migration to the Western hemis phere, as well as the question as to what races of the Old World they owe their origin. The results achieved by ethnography i...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1897

Mmamwi j.j4t& ,,,fi7it!J"?' Mppppppw 50 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. in your lives which makes the chapter set apart for the narrative of your deeds the most luminous in the history of America. THE COROADOS INDIANS. The Reverend Joseph Solari, writing to his superior-general from the Salesian Station in the Teresa Custina Colony, Mateo Grosso, Brazil, says this of the Coroados Indians: They are afraid of the least thing. A mere, scratch or a slight headache is enough to set them running to us for medicine. In this way, without being doctors, we have a very large practice, larger perhaps than that of some of the celebrated physicians in Europe. The customs prevailing among these Indians are anything but conducive to .the preservation of their health. They have nothing to cover themselves with either in summer or in winter. The consequence is that during the damp and bitterly cold nights of the latter season, especially, they contract some chest diseases that generally result in their dea...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1897

mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 51 " Until the Consummation of the World' When one, Catholic or non-Catholic, looks back at the condition of the Church three hundred years ago, and compares it with to-day, looking at it from a human standpoint, the spectacle is marvelous. Then heresy broke Christendom in two, and snatched all Northern Europe from the Church. One hundred years later, two hundred years ago, at the commencement of the eighteenth century, of all the British dominions Catholicity could be said to exist only in Ireland, and there it was cut down to loss than three quarters of a million and they were supposed to be without a Bishop, or even a priest, as the laws banished these under pain of death. In two centuries Catholicity has not only become the religion of the vast majority in Ireland, but it has brought back the hierarchy in England and Scotland, and spread with the spread of Great Britain all over her empire. The British Year Book gives the foll...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1897

wT-'-y 'i'Vitjyyriw i.iii ilii'JPWPpP'.l'Mllj1 "W7- 52 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. wm made to Abraham, and of the Mosaic revelation. To-day she is able, as from the first she alone has been able to occupy the world, for she is everywhere, and gains a hold on every class of human society, from millionaire to laborer, to which her missionaries reach. All opposition and enmity from evil men, powerful as they may be thought to be, is in vain. And why this marvellous spectacle, except that she is supernatural, that she is from God? It is the fruit of the promise of God her Founder. "Behold I am with you all days even to the consum mation of the world." This is the secret of her self renewing life, her irresistable energies, her perpetual youth. This is the cause of this mys terious potence she exhibits to all men to-day. Her thought to be most pow erful adversaries, that beset her path, to-day as ever, are powerless because they are merely human. She is nover at a loss. Certain of her doctrine ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1897

mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 53 of territory, given under treaty stipu lations to our Government, and out of which wo have now formed States in this Republic. This refusal to give the Indians money for the Christian schools that the Indian wants, and squandering it against his protest upon schools thnt ho does not want that his Christian con science rejects is not only misap propriation and theft, but it certainly is one of the most unworthy thefts that the Christian world has ever known. Hero are helpless Indians asking this great Government to not misappropri ate their money in their helplessness pleading with those who have possessed themselves of their lands to not mis appropriate (which is to not steal) the money due for the lands forming States that we are now so justly proud of. It is discreditable beyond expression. Kansas Catholic. A Pioneer. There died at the home of Michael Hafi'amier in this city, on Monday, January 25, at 1:30 p. m., an old and re spected ci...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1897

54 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. class" would presume to enter there. And yet among them were a few earn est souls, who, though born and reared in error, felt within them a craving for the things of God, which they sought to satisfy with the dry husks of the Protestant service. The hymn and the preliminary prayers being ended, the minister rose and read the Gospel for the day with a display of elocutionary powers well cal culated to tickle the ears of his audi ence, though that unction which might have moved their hearts was wanting. But there was one heart there which drank in the beautiful Gospel narrative as a flower drinks in the dew. It was the heart of a child a beautiful, dark eyed boy richly dressed, who sat be side a sweet-faced lady, his widowed mother. At the concluding words of the Gospel: "And the poor have the Gospel preached to them," little John Lay ton drew a long breath as if awaking from a dream, and involuntarily he scanned the richly-dressed congregation, reclin ing luxu...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1897

mmmmmmKmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 55 noticed the lady and the child, but thinking they were mere idle sightseers, gave them no further thought till, on turning to leave the church after hav ing finished his devotion, he saw them still kneeling there, for Mrs. Layton had lingered, longing to seek advice from the minister of God, yet unwilling to approach him without some pretext for so doing. Father Conrad must have read this desire in her eyes, for he approached her and asked kindly: "Madame, are you waiting to speak to me?" "Not exactly, sir," Mrs. Layton re plied. "But oh! if I might," she added, earnestly. "Follow me, madame," whispered Father Conrad, and he led the way to the sacristy. The result of the conversation which followed was that Mrs. Layton and little John went daily thereafter to receive instruction in the doctrines of the Catho lic faith, and before Advent came again they were admitted to membership with the poor of Jesus Christ. Many and bitter were th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1897

mmmrn py 56 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. The spiritual needs of the Negroes and Indians living in our midst, at our very doors, strongly impressed the Fathers of the Second and Third Plen ary Councils of Baltimore. They felt that these peoples have very special claims upon our charity; that Jesus Christ, who loves them, who shed His blood for them as for us, will surely hold us accountable if we fail to do what we reasonably can to secure to them the religious blessings which we enjoy. These are, we doubt it not, the senti ments of your own hearts they must be the sentiments of all who duly ap preciate the value of their faith. We have constantly brought home to us what the truths and practices of our Catholic faith mean for our own people. Before the child is able to reason out a line of conduct for himself, faith comes to tell him what he ought to do, and to give him motives that will strengthen his will to do it. Is he led away for a time by the seductive charms of world ly pleasure? Whe...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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