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Elephind.com contains 2,606 items from Mountain Laurel, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1984

very spot to camp and fish when we were your age. 'Course it was a mite different then. There used to be families and houses all up in here. Lumber was big then." Caleb pointed out his hand and said, "See that spot down the river a ways? That's where the old Splash Dam used to be. They'd build it ,up and the loggers would roll logs down into the river. When the water had built up high enough, they'd bust the dam and the force of the water would carry those logs all the way down to Kibler Valley. Used to have a train down there that could carry the lumber out. There was even a boarding house down in here. Caleb was watching to see if the boys were getting that look on their faces that his children sometimes did when he started telling about the "old days", but both boys seemed to be really interested. These were stories they had never heard before. Johnny stared at the river and said, "Imagine that. I wonder how many people have had this for their favorite spot? I never thought about...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1984

Page 30 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1984 BACKROADS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 32 We will begin our tour with our mileage reading 00.0 and the underlined numbers at the begining of paragraphs will indicate the total number of miles we've traveled from our point of begining to that point on our tour. We will make a complete loop and return to our point of begining at the intersection of US Highway 5$ and the Blue Ridge Parkway in Meadows of Dan, Virginia. The total distance traveled will be 48.1 miles and the tour will require approximately 3 to 4 hours. Be sure to take your camera! 00.0 From the intersection of US 5$ and the Blue Ridge Parkway in Meadows of Dan, Virginia, we will head north on the Parkway toward Roanoke, Virginia. 01.6 Mabry Mill is on our right. 03.7 Here we turn left onto state road 799 (Parkway milepost 174). 05.& This is the Conner's Grove Comnunity. there are two small white churches sitting side by side on our right. The first one is Conner's Grove Primitiv...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1984

BACKROADS Continued from previous page. 31.6 Turn left at this stop sign onto US 221 toward Floyd and Roanoke, Virginia. 32.9 Here we turn right onto state road IW. 36.2 Little Flock Primitive Baptist Church (Established in 1871) is on our left. This church is mentioned in the book, "The Man Who Moved A Mountain" by Richard Davis. 39-3 Beautiful view of Buffalo Mountain is on our left. QUALITY LOG HOMES AT AFFORDABLE PRICES The Beautiful, Natural Way To Live THE SHAWNEE IMPROVED "TUE BLUE RIDGE" * Beam and Snow Blocks ~.. __ __ ■ F=i , . i * Hardboard Splines 30 xSO 1500 SO. FT. 7 1 y _ . Gasketing OPTIONS: « 0 &^ 9,, T-p c ' M "LJ rH • Ten lnch Spikes • Log Gable Ends 1 *■*-' * Blueprints • Log Rafters For Main Building 30 * tti te| HES • Four Hours of Building And Porch (See Lafayette Model) j ee Supervision • Srorm Doors | BEDROOM "jl BEDROOM V ] L ' V, is 2°° M J /\ fJT" If\k I 0 m • Erection Crew informorion ,! "' 5 Ur I lUNb. avoiloble upon request J —l "- 1 1 1- •...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1984

HEART OF THE BLUE RIDGE VXountafo A. Copyright 1984 Laurel Publications Inc. SEPTEMBER / 1984 jLaureo Monthly Journal Of Mountain Life Page 32 A self-guided monthly tour of Mountain Backroads BA^ROAH^ hpglC-P-P • cfl (D W C E > -H W 3 = Sh'HP'HdIQOIDt, - CO %|E.^»s3|a -C (U Sh 'H -P O<D O S h £ > w £ 9 !>> <h |-3 a O3 sp 0 £.3 o &oco f stf 13 '£ 3 r ct3<uPwcrb>>w. 2w .p --d en $ >H 3 1 ..fplr^ P E P PbpQ) 3 >»OH C (C -H £ £ O 3 5) JO rH (D'HXI ft+J 3 H tO^ "Never take the main roads, they're the future with their stores, offices and service stations. Always travel the backroads. You 'can see the future tomorrow but backroads are the past and someday they may be gone. On backroads you can see old weathered barns with wagons and horse drawn hayrakes. There are meadows fenced with old chestnut rails and creeks that bubble and cascade over rocks that have ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1984

October, 1984 !\fonthh Journal Of Mountain Life Among old time mountain crafts, one emerges every fall of every year and it is timeless - apple butter making. Peggy Barkley has been making apple butter every year since she was 20. The recipe she uses is her Aunt Addie Wood's mother's recipe, making it well over a hundred years old. Each weekend in October (except the second weekend) until the weather gets too bad in November or December, Peggy and her family will be making apple butter at Addie Wood's Mayberry Trading Post at milepost 180-181 on the Blue Ridge Parkway. That second weekend in October, they will pack up their apples, kettle and jars and head for the Autumn Leaves Festival in Mount Airy, North Carolina. Peggy said to make three kettles of apple butter a weekend, on Friday they go after the apples - 27 bushels of them, (the kettle is a 50 gallon one.) Then six or seven hours are spent peeling and cutting the apples. Next, the apples are made into a sauce. On Saturday mo...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1984

Page 2 MOUNTAIN LAUREL OCTOBER, 1984 GHOSTS AND HAINTS OF THE HILLS AND OTHER STORIES GHOSTS AND HAINTS OF THE HILLS By: Imogene Turman The early settlers of this land brought with them superstition and tales to pass on to their children. As the tales passed on, they grew; sometimes the only way to control a houseful of children was to tell them scary things like, "Booger man will get you." My imagination had lots of terrible "Booger men" and bear tales could quench all desire to venture forth in the night. Talking to some neighbors, I've found sane tales passed down that were based on facts with, perhaps, a good bit of impressive telling, these stories made a dull night (without television or radio) tingle with goose bumps or cold chills going down the spine. Told to me by Glen Worrell is this account his grandfather told. His grandfather was Thomas Jeff Willis and he lived at the foot of Willis Gap. He had crossed the mountain to court Elizabeth Ayers. At about ten o'clock pm, he ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1984

"GHOSTS AND HAINTS" Continued from previous page. Indian Valley was where no one would stay but a short time. I passed there and a family was moving out. I asked them why so soon and they told me that every night around 3:00 a lock chain would be dragged down the steps. They were not going to put up with that any longer. I had a cousin, and we used to go courting over at Grape Hill at Burkes Fork. One night, I couldn't go, but he did. When I saw him the next Wednesday, he told me this. The road we walked on went by a cemetery. Now, on that Saturday night he got right beside of that cemetery and happened to look up there and he said something white was waving for him to come up there. He said his hat began to raise up on his head and cold chills were running up and down his backbone. He looked down at his feet and said, "Don't fail me now". He run all way home, which was about a mile and a half. Next day, he decided to go back and have a look around. What he found was a white piece o...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1984

Page 4 MOUNTAIN LAUREL OCTOBER, 1984 ALL WOOL AND ONE YARD WIDE Like many of his contempories, 27 year old Tom Dunn of Buckland, Virginia was caught up in the excitement of the battle cry, "Remember the Main" and he volunteered to go to war against Spain. So here he was in Florida in 1899, trained, fighting mad and ready for the big invasion of Cuba when peace came. Mustered out of the army there, he returned to his native state and the only trade he had ever known, spinning wool. When his father had died in 18$1 leaving no one else to support the family, Tcm Dunn, age 10 entered the Buckland Mills as a floor sweeper for $2.00 per week. He worked hard and he learned fast and before long he was performing better jobs for better pay. Then he moved to the Winchester Woolen Mill for .an even better weaving position. His daily route to work there took him by the city library and he soon became a voracious reader, borrowing and completing a new book each day. This not only assisted with h...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1984

WILD FLOWER JERUSALEM ARTICHOKE Everybody loves sunflowers. Even though most of us conjure up a picture of thern planted in a row in the flower or vegetable garden, some species also grow wild. In fact, they are native to America and were discovered by the Indians who dug the tubers and found them to be an edible vegetable. This species of sunflowers with edible tubers is the Jerusalem Artichoke. It's more than just another pretty flower, it's food! The tubers are hardy and survive harsh winters in the ground to send up new shoots in the spring. If dug though, they do not keep well for extended periods of time. The incredible thing about Jerusalem Artichokes is that you can do pratically anything with them. You can boil them with butter and serve like potatoes. You can slice them and make crisp pickles like you would do with cucumbers. You can also peel, slice them thin and serve them raw in a tossed salad. They are crunchy and have a taste described as, "Something like a cross betw...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1984

Page 6 MOUNTAIN LAUREL OCTOBER, 1984 The Chinese call it "the Yin and the Yang", the Hindu call it "Karma" and dyed-in-the-wool Southern Baptist like my mom and dad called it, "Coming home to you". But, no matter what it's labeled , the fact is that bad deeds and wrongful acts do have a way of coming back to haunt you. The following storyis an excellent example of just how unexpected the inevitable "coming home' 1 can be: The boys sitting around the pot bellied stove at Jess Singleton's Store knew a good story when they saw it coming, and from the look on Posey Jenkins face, a "doozie" was on its way. Jess's Store served as a rainy day hangout for every part time loafer and full time tobacco chewer within 5 miles. It never ceased to amaze the wives in these parts how bad, snowy weather could be to rough for the menfolk to help hang new curtains, but never to rough for a trip to Jess's Store for "necessities" such as a fresh plug of chewing tobacco or a new whet rock. The menfolk had...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1984

"COMING HOME" Continued from previous page. "Now boys, I can't rightly tell you what happened next, cause even the boys don't know, but one thing for sure, it was bad. That old buck run laps around the inside of that coupe and 'tween antlers and hooves, there just wasn't no way for the boys to keep outta his reach. Floyd told me that he always thought it took a whole herd of animals to be called a stampede, but that buck was doing a pretty good impression of a stampede all by himself." At this point in the story, Henry Thomas walked into the store with a grin that stretched from ear to ear. Tad Caldwell looked up at him from his seat on a nail keg and asked, "You hear anything strange near your place Saturday night, Henry?" "I reckon I did.", said Henry. "I got up to go to the bathroom 'bout 2:30 or 3:00 and as I was heading back to the bedroom, I heard this car a coming down the road real fast. I stepped out on the porch to see if I could tell who it was, and all of a sudden, here ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1984

Page 8 MOUNTAIN LAUREL OCTOBER, 1984 GROWING UP ON TOGGLES CREEK BY Y.K.W. Henry Rufus was a quiet easy going fellow who lived not far from us. Although he was much older than I was, I liked being with him. He showed me how to make a whistle from a chestnut sprout. You just rubbed the sprout briskly with a stick until the bark could easily be twisted off unbroken. Then you cut the proper notches and pretty soon, you had a fine whistle. When World War I came along, all the eligible young men around were drafted. Henry Rufus was among the last to be called. He had to report to the draft board in Stuart on November 11th, 191$. While they were standing around waiting for the train to take them off to war, the news came that the war was over. Everybody said that when the Kaiser heard Henry Rufus was coming, he promptly surrendered. BURIED TREASURE Cain Hylton was a hard worker and a shrewd trader and so accumulated some extra cash. He always wanted his money in silver dollars. If he coul...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1984

A BRIEF HISTORY OF CARROLL COUNTY © COPYRIGHT 1984 By ; Ninevah J* Willis 'KJOA gave me hills to clinb and strength for the clinbing Carrol County's lineage chart begins in Augusta County, [then it was a part of] Botetourt (1769), Fincastle (1772), Montgomery (1776), Wythe (1790), Grayson (1793), Carroll (1842). Carroll in 1845 annexed a portion of Patrick County and another part in 1854, now known as Fancy Gap District. Mr. John Carroll, a native of Ireland, who came to America and settled at Dugspur, got himself elected to represent Grayson County in the Legislature in order to form a new county and have it named for himself. His opponent, James Blair of Galax, caused the bill to be passed which provided "that the new county should be called and known by the name of Carroll County, in memory of Charles Carroll of Carrollton" the last survivor of the signers of the Declaration of Independence (January 17, 1842). Two years later Representative John Carroll got a bill enacted naming ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1984

Page 10 MOUNTAIN LAUREL OCTOBER, 1984 YOU CAN GO HOME AGAIN COPYRIGHT 1984 BY: HAZEL HEDRICK From 64 back to 6 years old is a long and tiring trip for just one day, and it is very rare that a family of six brothers and sisters between 55 and 65 years of age are able to get together for a reunion and a trip back to their school days, but, that is just what my brothers, sisters and I did (with the exception of my oldest brother who was in Europe). We gathered to attend the one room school we had attended reunion, the school's name was Piney Grove and it was where all my brothers and sisters got our formal education. Near by, was the Betheny Baptist Church where we went to Sunday School and Preaching. Both the school and church building are long gone but the grave yard is still there and a picnic shelter has been built where the church once stood. That picnic shelter is where our reunion was held. About 2:00 in the afternoon, my sisters and brothers and I decided to try and find the ol...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1984

Continued from previous page. and remembered, then walked on. Everything looked so familiar now, even the rocks in the creek. I pulled off my shoes and waded in the creek just like when I was a little girl, walking this road with bare feet. My sister started pulling small flowers to take home to plant in her flower garden, the rest of us started eating blackberries, picking daisies and drinking water from a little stream that came out of the mountain above the road. First we came to the old tobacco barn. The roof and lean-to were fallen in, but the old log barn and the furnace was still standing just like it was 50 years ago. A little further up, beyond the gully and below what used to be a road, was the pack house our daddy built with his own two hands. He cut the logs, notched them and put them up all by himself. We didn't get too close for fear of snakes, but it sure brought back memories. How many times we helped our parents grade and pack and unpack tobacco, getting it ready fo...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1984

Page 12 MOUNTAIN LAUREL OCTOBER, 1984 The Mail Box Dear Editor: On June 29th of this year a freak hail storm struck our apple orchards. This made it impossible to market our usual high quality fruit through our regular channels to super markets. We knew that these "dimpled darlings" kissed by Mother Nature were just as eatable and serviceable to the consumer as our apples had been in the past so we decided to market as a "pick your own" operation this year. We want to thank you and also your readers who have read our ads in your paper and come out in volume to buy our apples thus saving them money and helping us. We look forward to meeting a lot more of these fine folks on through October. Thanks again for the role your paper has played in this successful promotion. Sincerely, Nancy & Danny Johnson Johnson's Orchards Route # 680 North Bedford, Va. Dear Mountain Laurel, Sorry to read about Mr. Yeatts, we will all miss him. I'm so glad he granted you permission to use his ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1984

Dear Sirs: I am a teacher at Radford University in the Appalachian Studies Program and I have been doing research for two years on the traditional foodways of rural mountain people in the South. I would like to make contact with any person who has first hand knowledge of food growing, gardening, food preparation and preservation methods that were used in this area in years past, especially before 1920. I would also like to meet anyone who has written records that could be used to document farm life in this region prior to 1900. I can be reached by writing the history department, Radford University, Radford, Va. 24142. Thank you, Richard A. Straw Dear Mountain Laurel, I'm sending $6.00 for my renewal. I wouldn't miss a copy for anything. I sit down and read it from cover to cover just as soon as I get it. I love those stories and I love the mountains. Keep up the good work. M. Poteat Blackstone, Va. Subscribe Today To The Mountain Laurel A Monthly Journal Of Mountain Life Send A Gift...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1984

Page 14 MOUNTAIN' LAUREL' OCTOBER-, 1984 BLUE RIDGE BOOKSHELF BY: PARKS LANIER, JR. THE BRINDLE MULE: Stories and Poems of the Brushy Mountains by Robert Rosborough Leeper. 130 pages. Cloth $11.95; paper $7.95. Appalachian Consortium Press, University Hall ASU, Boone, N.C. 28605. This collection of eight stories and thirty-two poems captures the essence of mountain days gone by. It is the work of a man, now retired as an editor of professional educational publications, who loves the mountains, the countryside, and the people of his native region, these works are as pungent as honey on the tounge (see "Sarah") and as unforgettable. Leeper says of his mountain upbringing, "Afoot or on horseback, in good weather or bad, I roamed the fields, the roads, the footpaths, the woods of the area, talking with farming people, storekeepers, lumbermen, mill hands. In the homes, by the fireside, in the fields, at husking bees, in the school, in churches, at picnics, or hunts we listened to stories...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1984

MOUNTAIN RECIPE Just when you think you've seen it all, here comes something else. This month we received a recipe for yet another use for pinto beans - a pie! It was sent in by Kayt Linville who said it was given to her by her neice from Charlotte, North Carolina. The niece added, "It's so good, you'd never know what it was unless someone told you!" PINTO BEAN PIE 2 cups cooked pintos & broth (mashed) 3 cups sugar 4 eggs, beaten 2 sticks margerine, melted 2 teasp. vanilla 1 cup grated coconut 1 cup chopped nuts. Pour into unbaked pie shell and bake at 350 degrees for one hour. Makes 3 pies. Rhubarb is a plant that once planted, comes back year after year. It has been an old standby for country cooks for a long time. You can still find rhubarb plants growing at old homeplaces that have been long abandoned. The leaves are poisonous, but it is the stalks you use. By themselves, they are very sour, but may be cooked in a variety of ways. The most common one is to cook it as...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 October 1984

Page 16 MOUNTAIN LAUREL OCTOBER, 1984 ELIZABETH'S JOURNAL Jack Cooley of Hillsville, Virginia, with the permission of the Cooley family loaned The Mountain Laurel a copy of one of his ancestors' journal - Elizabeth Ann Cooley McClure, born July 21, 1825, died March 28, 1848. The journal was started February 20, 1842, when Elizabeth was only 17 years old and was kept until her death in March of 1848 of typhoid fever. During these years, Elizabeth grows into a woman and experiences love, marriage and travels westward with her new husband to settle in Missouri. It is fascinating from two stand points: First, it is an accurate description of the day to day lives of people in Carroll County, Virginia during that time frame. Second, it is a picture of the way of thinking of those people - their fears, their joys, their hopes. We will be printing entries from Elizabeth Cooley's Journal in the upcoming months. For your further enjoyment, this month I will describe a little of her family bac...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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