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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1989

July, 1989 Nutrients fought with old and new tools (Continued from Page 1) ninth signup will be July 17 through Aug. 4. The program allows farmers or landowners to bid for a federal contract in which the government shares part of the cost of installing and maintaining certain land in reserves for 10 years. CRP is available across the state, but for 24 priority counties, the Virginia Division of Soil and Water is offering farmers and landowners a one-time incentive of $50 per acre for grass vegetation and $100 per acre for conversion to trees. Counties eligible for this filter strip bonus are: Accomack, Caroline, Culpeper, Essex, Fauquier, Gloucester, Greene, Hanover, King George, King and Queen, King William, Lancaster, Loudoun, Madison, Mathews, Middlesex, Northampton, Northumberland, Orange, Rappahannock, Richmond, Spotsylvania, Stafford and Westmoreland. The signup for the state supplement is a separate process and will not affect eligibility for the federal program. * The Virgin...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1989

6 j jJnHp | _ y? "rnWWi If flilitfiMTMMHllßr I I ] fcjT 'JHHMMMV 1 v * ' ■ML/ — &i i General Manager Fred Scott (left) tells visitors from Farm Bureau that consumers' wants for dairy products are changing. A Shenandoah's Pride employee checks the gallon jug line at the new plant. (Photos by Kathy B. Springston) Shenandoah's Pride has space to grow KATHY B. SPRINGSTON VFBF News Editor MT. CRAWFORD - Shenandoah's Pride Dairy outgrew the space at its former plant and offices at Harrisonburg, while it grew into new products today's consumer wants. Bulldozers still worked outside the large new plant in Rockingham County May 24, as Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Board members and several members toured the spanking clean complex. Work areas bustled with people and machines making containers and filling them. Valley of Virginia Milk Producers Association, the cooperative that owns the business, started in 1921. Its board decided in April 1986 to buy 43 acres on Route 11, just ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1989

July, 1989 Members can help fight state's illegal drugs By DANA CARN Special to VFBF News Virginia farmers can join the battle against illegal drug activities in the state. The Virginia Marijuana Eradication/Suppression Program, a joint venture of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, the Virginia State Police and other agencies, is the weapon farmers can use to help stop marijuana from being grown on their own farms or neighboring farms. The program, established in 1983, encourages Farm Bureau members and others to report illegal marijuana growth and other drug activities to the state police by calling 1-800-553-DOPE. Police officials say the marijuana plants are usually planted during May and June and are harvested through September and October. Often, the plants are grown and tended on a farmer's land by trespassers. Because of the state's heavy rainy season, conditions are ideal for a "bumper crop" this year, so the VFBF and state police are asking farmers to be on the lookout. "...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1989

8 Farmer with picker escapes financial pickle By Liz Clarke Special to VFBF News NORFOLK—Jim Harrison was near bankruptcy before his dream invention, an automated cucumber picker, clattered across an Eastern Shore field, deftly lifting long green cucumbers from the damp earth. That initial success with a prototype late last summer promises new life for growers of long green, salad cucumbers and smaller cucumbers, called short greens, used for pickles. Annually, farmers grow about 175,000 acres of cucumbers and each acre yields about 200 bushels of cucumbers. According to the USDA, farmers have devoted about 110,000 acres to pickle production for each of the past three years. That market is stable because farmers grow under contract to such packers as Heinz. But acreage planted in salad cucumbers is declining, down between one third and one half in the Virginia/Maryland Eastern Shore. USD A data on salad cucumbers hasn't been collected in five years, but similar declines may be occur...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1989

July, 1989 Temperature through August v*v x xf 7 £| /t "S'SjV / ""K\ / / f fly /^) U \ ' :./^ ? ..;f6{ow Norrmf^^gJ^ X '"'I /V Precipitation through August « WnJlhjton #| Below Norrtial p'H*/ K : )'< y \ )-a While statewide temperatures are predicted to average out near normal, the area of below normal preciptation is predicted to be very large. For areas marked Ind. (Indeterminate), computer projections were uncertain. These computer weather projections are provided by the Virginia Climatology Office and not intended for legal use. What's cooking? July is National Peach Month and a good time to take advantage of the tasty varieties grown in Virginia. A peachy-keen dish to take to that picnic is peach cobbler. And have you ever thought about pickling peaches? Make peach pickles now, decorate the jars and give these treats as Christmas gifts. Peach Cobbler about 1 quart fresh or frozen 1/2 cup milk peaches 1 stick butter or 5 tablespoons self rising flour margarine 5 table...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1989

10 Food safety bill 'extreme' WASHINGTON—The president of the American Farm Bureau Federation has warned a bill to remove any possibilities of risk in farm chemicals is not in the best interest of consumers or farmers. Dean Kleckner, testifying May 31 before the House Energy and Commerce committee's sub-committee on health and the environment, said a bill sponsored by California Rep. Henry Waxman and Sen. Ted Kennedy went too far in trying to establish a "negligible risk" factor for all chemicals. "You can't get to zero risk in the society we have today," Kleckner told the committee. 'There's risk in everything we d 0... Driving a car is a much higher risk than using most farm chemicals. You have to balance the benefits of chemicals against their risk," he said. Kleckner said the safe use of farm chemicals has given the American consumer the best quality and lowest price food supply in the world, and banning most of those chemicals could have a drastic impact on consumer food budget...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1989

July, 1989 Registered Polled Hereford Bulls. 18 months old. Phone 804-589-8357. Ernest W. Morris Registered Polled Shorthorn Service Age Bulls. Also a few bred heifers. 703-825-0590. Bulls - Registered Angus - 12 - will rent or sell. Box 115, Goochland, Vo. 804-784-5145. BULLS - Beefmaster Bulls and Cow-Calf pairs. Call Vivian Evans, Ceres, Va. 703-682-4457. 10 registered Suffolk Ewes, 2 to 4 yrs. No foot rot. $150 each as group. 703-825-8758. Adorable Baby Pygmy Goat - White Male. $90.00. 703-832-3797. Commercial Sheep. White and Black Faced. Rams, Ewes, Lambs. Excellent Condition. Brian Ashdown. 703-937-4737. For Sale: Purebred Suffolks, Brood Ewes, Lambs and Rams. 804-823-2697. Registered Suffolk Sheep $150 up. Lambs to 3 year olds. Good Bloodlines. 804-478-4648. For Sale: 25 Dorset X Suffolk Yearlings to 6 year olds. 804-478-4909. HANOVARIAN SPORTHORSES AND CROSSBREDS. 3 years old (some started). $3500 up. Central Manor Farm. 804-248-6309. APPALOOSAS, STALLION, MARES. BEAUTIFUL ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1989

J§L JUt. 1988 Vol. 46. No. 7 THE VOICE OF VIRGINIAsJkGRICULTURAL PRODUCERS July, 19t9 "A big part of knowing our business is knowing yours." J 11. iLgj» t. ■" 1 * H fjj 9HfjQ| |# 1 At Virginia Farm Bureau Mutual we back time for us. every insurance policy with professional claims Too many people don't realize an insurance people. All our claimsmen are specialists when policy is only as good as its claim service. At it comes to repair costs, but more, importantly, Virginia Farm Bureau Mutual, a fair and prompt they understand the insurance needs of farm settlement is the hallmark of our service, families and the importance of prompt claims set- One reason more and more Virginia farm tlements. And unlike many insurance companies families have settled on Virginia Farm Bureau who employ adusters on a fee basis to help keep for their insurance is the way we settle claims, the cost of claims down, our claimsmen work full Why settle for less? Virginia Farm Bureau Insurance Services Helping...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1989

Vol. 48, No. 8 Bay Assistance rules stun farmers, others Note: This is the second of a two-part series on cleaning up the Chesapeake Bay. Last month's section dealt with voluntary efforts. This month, the Farm Bureau News looks at controversial regulations just adopted. By NORM HYDE VFBF Staff Writer RlCHMOND—Regulations have now been adopted that will govern what enters the Chesapeake Bay beginning in 1990 and continuing into the 21st century. But the new standards didn't come without intense concern from both the agricultural and environmental communities. While Virginia farmers agree that regulations are needed, the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation became dismayed and alarmed at land-use criteria adopted by Extinguisher saves life, combine, field By KATHY B. SPRINGSTON VFBF News Editor CARET—Essex County farmer Spottswood Taliaferro doesn't want to think about what would have happened if there hadn't been a fire extinguisher on his combine earlier this summer. "My hired hand, Jame...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1989

2 Last-minute buffer increase 'unreasonable' Virginia's Chesapeake Bay has been called one of the nation's most fragile ecosystems. This scenic, blue-green body of salty water stretches northward in Virginia from the congested Hampton Roads area through the rural, pastoral farm lands of the Eastern Shore and rural Tidewater. Over the years, though, the bay has become more of a holding tank for sewage from large metropolitan areas like Washington D.C., Baltimore and Philadelphia. It has become a veritable wasteland for some of the most potent industrial waste in the world that enters the bay from various tributaries to its north and west. It also has taken the brunt of millions upon millions of pounds of homeowner fertilizer that settles here after storms. And it absorbs some of the farm fertilizers that rains wash into tributaries on both sides of the bay. That's why Virginia, Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia agreed to the awesome task of reducing by 40 percent the li...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1989

August, 1989 Agri-Tech focuses on future and strategies (Continued from Page 1) Research Service admininstrator, said the research community needs to address five points: * Providing scientists with state of the art facilities and equipment. Virginia Tech's Soil Testing Lab was on a residential interest tour during Agri-Tech. Last year the lab did 94,270 soil tests and 1,668 plant tissue tests. (Photo by Kathy B. Springston) Bay board's regulations to cost farmers (Continued from Page 1) tidal range. If you take out 100 feet of it, that land would be worthless to them (as farmland)." Farm Bureau is planning meetings with both the assistance board and the Senate Agricultural Committee to discuss possibly reducing the buffer size. The Chesapeake Bay Foundation also is unhappy with the assistance board's actions and is asking Gov. Gerald L. Baliles to suspend implementation of those standards. The foundation wants the governor to order more public hearings because of substantial change...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1989

4 Cow-calf marketing opportunities on rise By MARTHA and RONNIE JONES Southside District A calf with the name "Opportunity" would sound a little silly, don't you think? But it's not so silly when you can see that he offers a real opportunity to make a profit no matter how his owner markets him this year. Exports of U.S. beef and veal, which eight years ago accounted for only about one half of 1 percent of domestic production, now equal nearly 3 percent of the nation's output. This sixfold increase means exports are now at the point where world trade conditions can affect domestic prices. We read in the Barnyard Bulletin the Catch Young Farmers on film Our State Young Farmer Committee is sponsoring a new contest this year — "Young Farmers Live." It is a photo contest. Our purpose is to seek statewide participation from the county Young Farmer committees in a photography project. Each district's 20 best photographs will be displayed at the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Convention in...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1989

August, 1989 Olin awarded Golden Plow WASHINGTON—The American Farm Bureau Federation has awarded Rep. Jim Olin, D-Va., its Golden Plow award in recognition of his support of Farm Bureau policies and philosophies throughout his seven years in Congress. AFBF President Dean Kleckner described Olin as an ally of American agriculture and highlighted many of his legislative accomplishments. "Jim has been a strong supporter of agriculture since his election to Congress in 1982, and, in fact, is the only member of the Virginia Congressional delegation to serve on a committee with jurisdiction over agricultural issues," the leader of the nation's largest general farm organization said. "Jim shares Farm Bureau's conviction that American agricultural policy must move toward a market orientation and away from federal subsidies," Kleckner said. In 1984, Olin offered Farm Bureauendorsed amendments to restructure the dairy loan program to make it more responsive to market forces, he noted. Kleckne...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1989

6 Memorials Charles B. Atwell Charles B. Atwell, 90, of Smyth County, a former member of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Board of Directors, died June 13. He served on the board for 20 years, including the period of reorganization in 1949-50. He retired from the board in November 1971. Atwell served Farm Bureau in many capacities, including honorary membership chairman. "At first we scoffed at his challenge to set a goal of 40,000 members," said Evelyn John, federation secretary. "But we took the challenge and saw our membership steadily grow to meet his goal, and then more than double that challenge." He also served as president of the Smyth County Farm Bureau. He was a charter member of the Smyth County Hospital Board of Directors, a charter member of Ceres Ruritan Club, a member of the Anacostia Masonic Lodge #21 of the District of Columbia, a member of Red Oak Church and a member of the Rich Valley Farmers Club for several years. Atwell was a native of Bland County. He is su...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1989

August, 1989 B^^Hk HHk * 1M Robert Sweeney tells visitors what being a Christmas tree farmer is like. (Photos by Kathy B. Springston) Forestry promises, problems seen By KATHY B. SPRINGSTON VFBF News Editor MADISON—German and English settlers found Madison County lush in forest land. It yielded chestnuts to ship to England and quality wood for furniture. Much of this Northern Piedmont county, however, was never logged because there wasn't the technology to get logs out of the mountainous areas, and some timber is still hard to reach, said Steve Hoffman. He is a county supervisor and a volunteer equipment operator with the Virginia Department of Forestry. Technology makes logging easier now, but people have to consider what to do in this terrain to preserve this resource, wildlife and water quality, said Hoffman to 92 visitors on a forestry tour of the county June 23. The 14th Annual Spring Forestry and Wildlife Tour Program was sponsored by the Virginia Cooperative Extension and Vir...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1989

8 Ornamental cabbage, kale display colors When most people mention cabbage roses they are referring to an old fashioned rose with a bloom reminiscent of a cabbage in form, but not in color. I think of a cabbage that is as pretty as a rose, the flowering cabbage. Long after frost dulls the color of summer annuals, the cool, bright colors of ornamental cabbage and kale provide a lasting display. In the milder parts of the state their pink and cream "blooms " can last the entire winter. The "blooms" of flowering cabbage and kale, as they are sometimes called, are actually colorful, ruffly leaves. Though their relatives are the humble garden cabbage and kale, the flowering varieties are quite elegant. Stark Bro's FREE 1989 s "Fruit Trees & Landscaping Catalog" Start growing your own full-size fruit on dwarf-size trees. ) Nothing compares with the sweet juicy taste of home-grown fruit I / picked fresh from your own trees Imagine the scrumptious pies, \ / cobblers, jams, jelli...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1989

August, 1989 ndMFT , f Sft ffiKßilL——i-——Jfli A German couple walk through Prince Michel Vineyards. German Farmers view Madison County By GREG HICKS VFBF Communications Director MADISON —Fifty West German farmers sampled Virginia's home-style cooking and southern hospitality, surveyed the Old Dominion's vast agricultural diversity and visited a worship site established by their ancestors nearly 250 years ago. It was all part of a day-long tour sponsored by the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation and the Madison County Farm Bureau June 22. The German farmers capped the day with an evening tour in Loudoun County. The tour included a family-style lunch at Madison County's famous Graves Mountain Lodge on the eastern slopes of the Blue Ridge Mountains. The farmers also visited the Hebron Lutheran Church in Madison which was built by German immigrants in 1740 and is the oldest Lutheran Church in use in the U.S. The first public school in Virginia was held in the building. SAFEMARK SUMMER BARG...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1989

10 Farmer's food dollar share is 25 cents PARK RIDGE, 111.—For every dollar the consumer spends for food, the farmers who produce it get an average of a quarter, according to a recent analysis by the American Farm Bureau Federation. The other 75 cents goes for the various processing, shipping and retail costs of getting produce to the consumer. The highest single portion of the food dollar, 34.5 cents, goes for labor. There's also a wide variation in the share going to the farmer among the various commodities produced. The farm value of a ready-to-cook chicken represents more than half what the consumer pays, while the farm value of a one-pound loaf of bread is less than a nickel of the 61.3 cent average retail price. Low-input concept gets low response WASHINGTON—Major farm groups, including the American Farm Bureau Federation, had a lukewarm reaction to the concept of Low-Input, Sustainable Agriculture (LISA) June 22 at a congressional hearing. AFBF President Dean Kleckner said fa...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1989

August, 1989 Registered Angus Bulls, 14 months, Pine Drive Big Sky Bloodline, $800. Amelia, Va. 804-561-2490. For Sale: Simental Simbrah Bulls. Thornhill Farm, 703-775-5220. Purebred Angus Cows Bulls Calves for Sale or Trade for real estate. 703-364-9609. Registered Polled Shorthorn service age bulls. Also a few bred heifers. 703-825-0590. Registered Angus - 10 yearling heifers, 10 young cows w/calf and rebred. 804-589-8608. Purebred Nubian dairy goats for sale. Milkers and kids. 804-823-5864. Purebred Rambouillet and Rambouillet-Finn cross ewes. Yearling to 4 years old. 804-842-2173. Two registered Nubian does. 1 three year old kid. 804-842-2173. For Sale: 60 commercial Dorset Suffolk Cross Lambs. 703-579-4562. 919-384-2251. Registered Suffolk and Polled Dorset ewes, rams and lambs. 703-688-4479. For Sale: Reg. Quarter Horses - weanlings, broodmares, riding horses, barrel and poles. 804-676-3975. Top breedings. Miniature Horses - 2 colts, 1 stallion, trained to a cart. Great with k...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 August 1989

N E W S Vol. 48, No. 8 THE VOICE OF VIRGINIA S AGRICULTURAL PRODUCERS The Church Guardain mm iW- . *r*ifn ir *y * * fanH^JmZ'* T #1 !*»* *? t|;t A \*J«4 It imp*. 1/i *f ■> *» Jiift»l II A/ n « Am . ui llv Jr I V / \ W J |j|||| » If/v /,/ * * wSM&JHb6# * t iJ :><< \\i I - Virginia Farm Bureau has developed an outdoor signs and many others, insurance program specifically designed You will find this package insurance to provide churches with the coverages program for churches gives a much they need to fully protect themselves. The broader coverage with a considerable Church Guardian program provides either premium reduction. Named Peril or All Risk coverages on Call your county insurance advisor soon buildings and contents, plus needed liabili- for more information on this new program ty coverages. Optional coverages include offered by Virginia Farm Bureau Instained glass, plate glass, church theft, surance Company. What's new , "...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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