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Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 4,559 items from Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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DOING THE DOCTOR. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 29 June 1917

DOING THE DOCTOR. Bobbs always was a quick witted chap. Only one other possession of his was as nimble as that wit of his, and that was his money. He was alwgys broke, and always reckless withal. He took a cab once, being a bit unsteady, to convey him from the club to his dwellings, the latter some distance. The cool night air blowing through the open windows sobered him enough to permit of his * realising that he had no money to pay the cabman's fare. Just at that moment the driver made that very usual inqviry : "What address did you say, sir ?" And Bobbs said, promptly, " Dr. So-and-so," such a street and num ber, the same being round the corner from his own abode. The house reached, Bobbs dashed up .the steps, rang the bell furiously, implored the doctor to go at once with his in- - struments to such and such a house, the lady being in a dying condition from an accident. A cab was at the door, and would the doctor take the cab ? The doctor would. Bobbs huddled him in, gave the dr...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A WOOL-GATHERER. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 29 June 1917

A WOOL-GATHEREPR. A well-known cleric, who was noted for his absent-mindedneas, was en gaged to preach in a church in a neighbouring city. He had purchased a new hat for the occasion. The young man who was to escort him to the church met him at the rail way station. Tpon meeting him he said, after what the parson thought a rude stare :--"I beg your pardon, sir, but your hat- "Oh, yea; never mind the hat," the clergyman interrupted" and proceeded to ask sonme questions. The people they met stared and smiled. "Strange how many people notice when one has got a new hat," the parson thought. The church was reached, and the worshippers approa ching naturally turned, to observe the noted preacher. His host met him at the vestry door to welcome him, but hesitating, said, "Pardon me, hut pray why do you wear your hat so ?' The tile was doffed, and the out side found to be still covered with white paper, which the absent-minded divine had forgotten to remove.

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WISE AND OTHERWISE. BILL'S PERFORMANCE. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 29 June 1917

WISE AND OTHERWISE. -- - -r BILL'S Pl?RFORMANCO. Bill Brown was up on a charge of unprovoked assealt, and the solicitor for the prosecutor was putting him through a very severe cross-examita tion. Bill stoutly maintained that he "only pushed" the prosecutor. "Well, about now hard?" queried the solicitor. "Oh, just a little bit," responded Bill. "Now/' said the other. "for the benefit of the cou-t, you will please step down here, and, with me for the subject, illustrate just how hard yos mean." Bill descended as per instructions. and approached the waiting attor ney. When he reached him, the spec tators were astonished to see him slap him in the face, kick him in the shins,' seize him bodily, and finally, with a supreme effort, left him from the floor and hurl him prostrate ac ross the table. Then, facing the court, he explained, quietly : "Yor worship, about one-tenth that hard."

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FIRST TO ADOPT CONSCRIPTION. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 29 June 1917

FIRST TO ADOPT CON SCRIPTION. Switzerland was the first European country to adopt universal service. The original founders of the Swiss Confederation enacted that whoever shirked military training was declar ed "devoid of honour and perjured." and his house was vowed to destruc tion. Should rman summoned to take 'part in a military expedition prove unable to respond, owing to illness or some other valid reason, he had to furnish a capable substitute at his own expense. From the ear liest days of the Confederation, too, the military authorities made special provisions for tending the wounded. In this respect they seem to have been in advance of their times.

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DEEP BREATHE TO BE WELL. HOW IT SHOULD BE DONE. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 29 June 1917

DEEP BREATHE TO BE WELL. HOW IT SHOULD BE DONE. Since deep breathing is a popular health measucre, advocated also by many medical men, a scientific can sideration of the subject by a com petent medical observer should be welcome. Professor Arnold Hillier, an eminent German, pointed out in a recent address that deep breathing has been recommended chiefly for as thmatics and young candidates for tuberculosis, especially children. Aside from these uses the exercises are employed to promote general well-being. Diaphragmatic (the dia phragm is the partition which sepa rates the chest organs- from the stomach organs) breathing in super ficial breathers is the only form in use. As the diaphragm descends with forced inspiration it compresses the soft, plastic tissue of the liver and increases the passage of blood through that organ. -At the same time it increases the secretion and excretion of the bile. Any condition, like gallstone dis ease, which is aggravated by stag nation in the liver ...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Cicely Vibart's Love. (Published by Special Arrangement.) (Copyright.) CHAPTER XXII. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 29 June 1917

Cicely Vibart's Love. By ANNIE HAYIES Author of "Lady Carew's Secret." "Footprints of Fate," Etc., Etc. (i'ublisiled by Special Arrangement.) (Copyright.) CHAPTER XXII. Cicely, what does this mean?" Cicely paused a moment in her rest less walk up anti down the room, and looked at her sistor-in-law. "Where is Stephen?" Mrs. Bowman shrugged her shoul ders. "Shut up In the library with the man from Scotland Yard- and Mr. Burton. Apparently he likes losing the sapphires. At any rate, he seems bent on placing every obstacle in the way of their recovery. He is positive ly hindering tile police instead of help ing them." Cicely's face twitched oddly. She resumed her pacing backwards and forwards over the length of the room. MIrs. Bowman seated herself on a chair near the door and watched her. her pleasant face growing more and more perplexed. It was the morning after the discov ery of the loss of the jewels. It had been impossible to keep the fact that they were missing a secret, and it ha...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHINA'S WONDERFUL NEWS CARRIERS. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 29 June 1917

CHINA'S WONDERFUL NEWS CARRIERS. Travellers who return from the re n:ote interior of vast countries where telegraphs and railways are practical ly unknown will tell you of the as tonishing swiftness with which news travels, despite the seeming absence of facilities. Away in the wilds of the Tibetian border, or in the Mongolian deserts, hundreds of miles from the nearest telegraph wire, the traveller will per chance hear of some momentous e-ent in the outside world ivithin an incredibly short while of its happen ing. This rapid transmission of news is the work of natives employed in courier services of higher organisa tion! than we have ever dreamed. hl!lln, that spacious land where dis-1 tance is measured by days, not miles, affordl: the best example. Flor, al i, oulgh the nlenns of communication by, rail and telegraph have greatly de veloped there of late, the bulk of the interior is still virgin to these inven, lions of the "foreign devil." and China still maintains what has been ...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WONDERFUL. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 29 June 1917

WONDERFUL. Mr. Newrych, thinkinking that a me,=: tor car was essential to his posi tion, decided, to obtain one at a cer tain place recommended by pone of his friends. "I want a good, reliable- car!" he' said to the manager on his ,arrival. '. the next day. "Yes, sir ; we have the beat in the trade." "I want the beat on the road !,"' commented Mr. Newrych. "There- it is !" exclaimed the man ager, pointing to a certain car. "I should be pleased to take you for a trial spin in it," he added. "All right !" said Mr. Newrych,- . and they started. Everything went all right for about a mile, and then the machine gradu ally slowed down until finally they stopped. The manager jumped out - and made an. examination. "Wonder-:; ful ! wonderful I" he exclaimed. "What is the matter ?" asked Mr. Newrych. "Why, there's no blessed engine on this car !" "Then what in the world has it --.. - been going on ?'" "Simply its reputation, sir ! sim-, ply its reputation !" Proudly replied : the manager.

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE GREAT CONUNDRUM. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 29 June 1917

THE- GREAT CONUNDRUM. It is often said that love is blind, and, judging by the experiences of a newly-married couple, it hasn't much sense of taste, either. A few weeks after the wedding a friend dropped into the bridegroom's studio, and found the artist and his bride laughing heartily at some joke. "What ever is amusing you so much ?" he asked, in amazement. "On, it's been so funny !" gurgled the young wife, as she wiped the tears of joy from her eyes. "My hus band painted and I cooked this morning, and now we ere both try ing to guess what the things were meant for." Teacher : "Where is your brother this morning, Bobby ?" Bobby "Plese. mi~s, he's ill in bed." Teach er: "What's the matter with him?" Bobby: "Please, miss, we were see inj who could lean out of the window farthest and he fell out.' She: "Anyhow, you m?st admft he iu a very well-bred man. Did you notice his knowledge of Ruakin ?" He : "I did, and if you want my candid opinion, I don't believe ires ever been there.' - 1...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FAMILY OF SIXTY-SIX. Small Households Considered Bad Form. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 29 June 1917

FAMILY OF SIXTY-SIX. Small Households Considered Cad Form. The Chinese are proud of large families. and a large family living together under one roof is looked up on as proof of the good tern per and correct course of li'e of its members and as a su5he path to prosperity. A large family which is able to live together without: dividing up the property always re weives much credit and is highly re spected. It is one of the highest dls .inctions in 'lina to have W\u Fl'u l'ung T'ang, or live generations, un .ler one roof. although such a distine .ion is attained by very few. According to a recent census, the a'I!y of :,leng Vu Shihl, a widow, of .he village of M.laulao. in the terri .ory of Wei-hai-wel, has the distine .ion of being the largest in the land. ler family consists of sixty-six mem ,ers, and, with one servant, tllere are sixty-seven mouths to be fed daily. Meng Yu Shill is sixty-six years fld, and has nine sons and numerous grandchildren and great-grandchil Jren, all living...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A TREE THAT OWNS ITSELF. Extraordinary Clause in Will. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 29 June 1917

A TREE THAT OWNS ITSELF. Extraordinary Clause in Will. At Athens. Georgia, there is a giant white oak tree which no one may buy or sell or cut down; nobody owns the land in which this tree stands. The tree own itself. It stands on top of one of the hills of the city, and is said to be between 400 and 500 years old. Early in the nineteenth century the owner of the plantation on which the tree stood often used to sit in the shade of the huge oak. Finally he became so attached to the tree that he made a will which deeded the tree to itself. I!e wrote: "For, and in consideration of the great love I bear this- tree, and the great desire I have for its protection for all time. I con nvoy to it entire possession of itself. and all land on 8ft. of the tree on all sides." Antl so the tree came to own itself and 8ft. of ground sur rounding it.

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FLIES HATE BLUE. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 29 June 1917

FLIES HATE CLUE. The only color that flies can see well is white. They see yellow fairly well, they hate blue and green; red makes everything appear dark to 'hemn. and they don'tree violet at all. The Eastern nations. which are far more prstered with files than we are. have discovered how much flies dis like blue. The Arabs treat their houses with a kind of light blue wash and the Japanese hang curtains of blue glass-beads and bamboo at the entrance to their baker and butcher sheps. These curtains-they are often umsed in Australia-let the air in and the flies, should there be any in the -oom, pass olt between the blue heads towards the IIght. but they do not re-enter. Blue is a good sunmmer color. It keeps out the heat, and thus makes the room cool, and keeps flies away. These insects will be found to settle quite inactive, on a dark blue blind Directly the window is opened they will rush out towards the light.

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 29 June 1917

This Good Old-Fashioned Home-Made Remedy Restores Your Hair to Its Natural Color. This home-made preparation is un equalled as a powerful stimulant to the growth of the hair, and for re storing it-not dyeing it-to its na tural color. It is equally good for re moving dandruff, giving the hair life, brill:ancy and color, for stopping itch Ing and keeping the scalp in.first-class condition. It is not greasy or sticky, and there is no coloring to rub off at nights on to the bed linen. Get 1 _oz. of Rejuveni Compound from the chemist, to which add loz. of Bay Rum. Shake well together; then add enough water to make lOns. (?- pint) in all. A little rubbed well into the roots of the hair every night will coon completel? restore the natural color of the hair and renew the growth where thinness is showing. Almost every chemist has these sim ple ingredients in stock, or can eas Ily get them for you from the whole salers. S. U. Henasall. Chemist, 246 Clar endon-street. South ]Melbourne. Counn t...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AMBASSADORS DON'T PAY RATES [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 29 June 1917

AMBASSADORS DON'T PAY RATESI In permitting Mr. Gerard, the late American Ambassador, to quit Ger many without being obliged to have his luggage overhauled by the cus toms officers, the authorities there were merely following the time-hon ored precedent in such cases. There are many similar privilegesf pertaining to these highly-placed per sonages. For instance, no ambassa dor can be legally compelled to pay rates or taxes in the country to which he is accredited. In 1909, the now notorious Beth mann-Hollweg. then German Ambas sador in London, took' a nice little riverside residence at Walton-on Thames, where he used to spend hisI week-ends. - i The rate collector sent in- his claim in due course, but Bethmann-Hollweg' declined to pay, and the Treasury, to whom the Walton authorities appeal-I ed, upheld him in his refusal. Similarly, an ambassador cannot be sued for debt, nor can he legally be arrested for any crime whatsoever, and this privilege extends also to all his servants. In ...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Undeserved Compliments. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 29 June 1917

Undeserved Compliments. CartainfJinks was giving a dinner party and had arranged a nice little toast-list, in deference to the pre hence of Major Claquer, an able after-i dinner speaker. The latter was accompanied by his wife, a very deaf 'old lady, who was much attached to him. As the gallant officer was to respond to the toast of "The Bables," his wife, knowing his fondness for children, judged that it would suit him admirably. At the last moment, however, the major's subject, unknown to his lady, was changed to "The Ladies." But it made no difference to the officer. His sparkling speech delighted the company. As the echo of clapping hands died down, the major's wife broke forth: "You don't know how fond the major is of them. I've seen him with two of them on his lap at once. Just teasing the life out of the poor things. Every chance he gets he's cure to have them in his arms, or be romping with them; knowing his loving nature, they'll come to him when they won't go to anybody els...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AUSTRALIA PLAYS THE GAME NO. XXIV. THE NECESSITY FOR STRONG AND DETERMINED ACTION. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 29 June 1917

AUSTRALIA PLAYS THE GAME No. XXIV. THE NECESSITY FOR STRONG AND DETERMINED ACTION. The lukewarmuess of Australia in the war is probably more apparent than real. Mr. Hughes and the Na tionalist Party went to the poll with only one plank to their political plat form. It was labelled "'Win the War." The sweeping victory. obtain ed indicates that the people in their hearts wish before everything to win the war, and are ready to make any sacrifice which the contingencies oi the situation necessitate. The per sistent decrease in the number of recruits may be adduced as evidence to the contrary. But we believe the real explanation is that, after the great triumph of the Win-the-War Party, the people see the folly of con tinuing a rather barren and expen sive volunteering campaign when the Nationalist `Government have it in their power to take steps to enable Australia to continue to play that prominent part at the front which has distinguished her forces since the beginning of the war. 'ih...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TRAINS FROM MELBOURNE. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 29 June 1917

TRAINS FROM MELBOURNE. a.m. a.m. Mondays only, 7.34, ar. Fakenham 9.14 Daily 7.52 ,, 9.27 p.m. p.m. 4.30 ,, 6.2 6.40 ,, 8.45 a.m. p.m. Thurs. & Fri. 11.23 ,, 1.24 Sunday 11.5 ,, 12.44 p.m. , p.m. Saturday 1.30 ,, 3.15

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WHY THE GERMANS ARE BRUTES. INTELLECTUAL FACULTIES AND BESTIAL FORCE. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 29 June 1917

WHY THE GERMANS ARE BRUTES. INTELLECTUAL FACULTIES AND BESTIAL FORCE. - P~rofessor Arthur Keith has made a remarkable comparison of the skulls of representative Englishmen and Germans. The professor is one of the best known anthropologists, and is especially noted as an a.thority on skulls. In making his present investigation he estimated the skull measurements of representative Germans, including General von Hindenburg, General von Mickensen, and General von Kluck, and compared them with those of a number of representative Englishmen, including Mr. Idoyd George, Mr. As quith, and General Sir Douglas Haig. As a result Professor Keith announ ces that -the representative German skull is essentially different from the British skull in that the German skull is marked by a square form and somewhat retreating forhead., with a heavy projecting Jaw of the type known to science as "prognathous," while the Englishman of the ruling class has a long head, a more high ly developed forehead, and ...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A MATCH FOR A SCOTSMAN. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 29 June 1917

A MATCH FOR A SCOTSMAN. -4-~--- The taciturnity of the Scots is Proverbial, and is maintained in the trenches. A lady who gives her ex periences at a Y.M.C.A. hut some where in France, says they frequent ly pointed to the articles they want ed to buy without vouchsafing a word. She always humoured them, and business was transacted in com plete silence on either side. It is rather an achievement to outwit a Scot, says the "Globe." but she is able to say that once at the tobacco stall she forced a dour-looking ser geant to speak. At the time mat ches were extremely scarce, and in order to make, them go round it was the rule only to see one box to each man. Jock pushed two tickets to wards the narrator and pointed to the matches; and, she continues, "I gave him one box and returned the second ticket, which he thrust ve hemently at me again, and again I returned it in silence. This was too miuch for him, and he burst into speech. 'Twa matches.' 'Oh, you aren't dumb, after all,' and his ...

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HIS CHOICE. [Newspaper Article] — Pakenham Gazette and Berwick Shire News — 29 June 1917

HIS CHOICE. Jock Macintosh was a labourer worthy of his hire, and as his job oi the farm seemed to warrant he re solved to get married. Jeannie, his own true loved one, was willing, but before giving her consent her mother arked if he was able to support a wife in comfort. "Of course I car.," replied Jock. "Why, there's hardly a mornin' but I leave some o' my parritch-in fact, if I dinna get a wife I maun hae a dog fI"

Publication Title: Pakenham Gazette And Berwick Shire News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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