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Elephind.com contains 8,145 items from Grenville Standard, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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THE VICTORY. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 3 April 1915

THE VICTORY. ? By A. G. Greenwood. She had avoided him. From the window of her bedroom she watched him come bustling from the house— a short, plump little man, with hair so black that the suspicious whisper ed it was dyed, his beady eyes glit tering beneath their unhealthily heavy and blue-black lids, his Semitic nose appearing very red by contrast with the pallor of his flabby cheeks. Hermann Reeth clambered into his huge car, with its silver fittings and grey suede upholstery, drew a big cigar from his gold case, leaned back against his air-cushions, crossing his sleek, plump hands over his bulging white waistcoat, and was rapidly driv en away. The car had not disappeared among the trees at the end of the drive when a footman came to Greta's door and knocked. "Yes?" "Sir Peter wishes to see. you, miss." "Oh, very well." She frowned uneasily. What had Mr. Millionaire Reeth (as the derisive but fawning countryside dubbed the purchaser of Staithes Castle)—what had Reeth and her fathe...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER XX. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 3 April 1915

CHAPTER XX. It was not until she had come back from this long and splendid marriage ceremony and was alone in the wel come seclusion of her own room for a few moments that Margaret was given the information that her father had been seized with a paralytic stroke that very morning and was ly ing at the Cloisters speechless and helpless, a condition from which he might emerge but which more prob ably would end in a lingering death. It was Spence, the maid who loved her so much, who gave her this news and who was with her now in her bedroom. The bad news from the Cloisters had come early in the morning; but Lady Alicia's will had very quickly been made known throughout the house. No one was to breathe a word of what had happened to Miss Margaret. "It is too late mow to make any change," Lady Alicia had said to Spence when she had impressed this silence on the maid. "The wedding must go through! If possible, I shall be glad if Miss Margaret can get away afterwards without knowing anythi...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SUNSET AND DAWN CHAPTER XIX. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 3 April 1915

SUNSET AND DAWN | By EFFIE ADELAIDE ROWLANDS. ^Published by arrangement with Ward, Lock & Co. Ltd., Lon. & Melb.) All Rights Reserved. CHAPTER XIX. Marcus Vinsen remained oil at the old house at Highgate. He drove down just .for an hour or two in the m/"\»iiig not only to attend to his own business but to look after some very important matters which Madame Due-heron had talked over with him the last time they had heen together. The news had spread to the estab lishment that niadame was very ill, and a gloom had settled upon the crowd of busy workers. For though a stern task-mistress, exacting full est measure of duty, Rachel Ducheron was at the same time a just and even a generous employer. ,\ladame Pauline, the head woman, had tears in her eyes as she spoke to Mr. Vinsen. -I can't believe that we may never see her here again. It is too terri ble," she said. "I've no heart for anything." She threw out her hands with a lit tle gesture of despair. "And yet there is so ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
III [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 3 April 1915

III. On the afternoon of that same day James Bowen had a shock. He was walking down Regent-street when he saw a girl of about twenty or thereabouts emerge from a milliner's shop and turn to the right. She was accompanied by a tall, well-made man of military appearance, who was laugh ing heartily at some remark made by his companion. Jim, petrified with astonishment, Btood stock still and, himself unobserv ed, watched the couple out of Bfjjht; 'hen, after a moment's hesitation, he entered the aforesaid shop and put a question to the proprietress. "Pardon me," he said politely, and lifted his hat, "but can you tell me who is the lady who has just left your shop in company with a gentleman?" The woman hesitated, 'but something in Jim's face prompted her to give him the information. "Well, sir"—with a deprecating smile—"I don't suppose there's any harm in my telling you, but I should have thought -you'd have seen the young lady's portrait in the papers. She's Lady Jean Pretty—Lord Dol m...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
III [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 3 April 1915

til. Three weeks sped swiftly by—three deliriously happy weeks, during which James Bowen lived in a dream where two purple-hued eyes haunted . his mental vision, and a low-toned, mu iscal voice sounded for ever in his ears. For the first time in his life he was in love, and it did not trouble him one whit that the object of his pas sion was "plain Jane"—his mother's new parlor-maid. Rather did he glory in the fact when he remembered all that he would be able to do in raising her to a position he felt to be hers by right. By profession he was an au thor, but apart from his earnings he was—independently of his mother— a rich man, and would be able to sup port his wife in luxury and comZort. He had almost persuaded himself that Jane must be what she represented; for she had taken up her duties at his mother's house in Chiswick in so capable a manner as to leave no doubt in the lay mind about her proficiency. "S'he is a perfect jewel," exclaimed Mrs. Bowen enthusiastically, when Jane ha...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 3 April 1915

CYCLE AMD MOTOR CYCLE ,—RSP&IKS It doesn't matter what's the matter with your machine—Cycle or Motor Cycle—send it to me. 'I'll guarantee to "fix it up." I don't employ " tinkers," but expert mechanics, whose sole aim is to turn out work that will give satisfaction. And that's what you WILL get if you let me do your work. Sole District Agent for England's premier Motor Cycle—the L.M.C. -J. A. HOUANDr 107 STURTST., BALLARAT. PHONE 49G. Tel. 410. Estab. 1853 L. E. CUTTER, CARRIAGE & MOTOR BUILDER,. ARMSTRONG STRBET.HOOTH BALLARAT, — HEADQUARTERS for . high-grade Ve hicles, Motor Body experts, Wind Shields (fitted up with latest fixings), Hood Coverings of the latest designs. Cars painted and ornamented by latest scientific methods. Single and Double Abbott Buggies, Open Buggies, Double and Single Buggies suitable for country use, Gigs, Road Carts, Sulkies of all descriptions, Farmers' Spring Drays, Waggonettes of all descriptions, and Bush Fire Carts. Write to us for q...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
GRENFELL'S TWENTY-ONE YEARS ON THE LABRADOR. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 3 April 1915

GRENFELL'S TWENTY-ONE YEARS ON THE LABRADOR. More than a score of years past there sailed from England a staunch little mission ship, the ketch Albert, whose destination was Labrador. That modest craft -went out of commission long ago, but the work begun and continued by Doctor Grenfell, her dauntless master, has grown in a sur prising manner, and has become a ro mance in modern.mission annals. The heroic doctor set out im the world to find two things—first, a chance for fine adventure; second, an opportunity to practise the Christian religion. He found them both on the wild coast of Labrador, where _ the very summer is almost like winter and the winter is terrific in rigor without any mistake. Equipped by an "apprenticeship of several years' cruising among deep sea fishermen in European waters, and establishing the medical mission to those toilers of the North Sea, Grenfell, when that work was organ ised, when the fight was gone out of it, sought a harder task, namely, to convey li...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Smythesdale News. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 3 April 1915

Smythesdale News. o A very successful concert in aid of the Belgian Fund took place last week, Mr M'Menamin presiding. The pro-' gramme was mostly supplied by Bal larat artists, and they made the func tion a brilliant success. The pro grammes, printed by Messrs Baxter and Stnbbs, and given as a donation, were greatly appreciated, and sold freely. It is expected that about £85 will be realised as the result of the effort. Before Mr M. D. M'Menamin, J.P., the adjourned magisterial inquiry rela tive to the death of Miss P. Hunter was resumed on Monday. Edward Davies, 8 years of age, stated that he was riding in the gig with Miss Hunter, when the accident occurred. He stated that the harness broke and the gig tipped up and threw Miss Hunter against a post in a fence along the road. He aud two. other childen were also thrown out. Miss Irene Riley corroborated the same statement of the previous witness. A verdict of accidental death through be ing thrown out of a gig was returned.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
IV [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 3 April 1915

IV. James Bowen made quite certain that his mother had secured the ser vices of a new parlor-maid before de ciding on his return, and then he sent a wire to say she might expect him home in time for dinner. It was nearing the end of Septem ber, and the evening was quite cold, with a slight touch of frost in the air, when he arrived at the Rowans and made his way direct to the drawing room. He was half-way across the room, which he believed to be untenanted, when he was startled by someone rising out of the depths of a capacious arm-chair and standing ibefore him with hands outstretched in welcome. The "someone" was in evening dress, but wore no jewels. The danc ing Games suffused her face with a warm, rosy glow and fell caressingly | on her bare neck and arms. "You!" cried Jim, and in his vbice there sounded a sharp note of an guish. "What are you doing here?" He matte no movement to clasp the prottered hands, and with a little sigh the girl turned aside and, leaning an arm on the m...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 3 April 1915

tlC # I £ I E W Pharmaceutical • C® %/OllEiU Chemist, 310 STURT ST., BALLARAT. Next Lester's Hotel. All Prescriptions and Orders Receive Utmost Despatch. A Large Stock of Everything in a Chemist's Shop Kept. Teeth! Ttei! Tntt! Absolutely Painless Extractions. All Sets G-uaranteed to Fit and Work. No Fit, no Pay. Written Guarantee Given, so if one get Good Goods, one should be contented to pay, arid if not, you are protected by guarantee. Commonwealth JSL Bank ofBustralla HEAD OFFICE SYDNEY This Bank is open (or all classes of GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS POST OFFICE BUILDINGS, Sturt Sc. Lydiard Sis., BALLARAT Also at Melbourne, Sydney, Newcastle, Broken Hill, Dubbo, Canberra, Ade laide, Perth, Hobart, Brisbane, Rockhampton, Townsville and London. Cable remittances made to, and drafts drawn on foreign places direct. Foreign bills negotiated and collected. Letters of credit issued to any part of the world. Bills negotiated or forwarded for collection. Banking and Exchange Business of ever...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Our Boys in Egypt. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 3 April 1915

v LETTER FROM MR STAN. WISE. We appencT some extracts from a letter recently received from Mr Stan. Wise by his parents at Linton. Mr, Wise writes from Mena Camp, Egypt:— The fighting on the Canal has all fizzled out. They sent down two battal ions of infantry of ours, but no artillery, so we did not have to go. It was . well over bar the hurraying when they got there, so we did not miss much. I saw some of their bullets. They are different from ours; they have a sharp point. The Turks.are a miserable lot of poor devils ; I saw some of them in Cairo as prisoners. I am getting tired of being here. It I would be all right if we had plenty of money, but we only get 2s per day while we are in Egypt, and things are pretty dear. Australian butter is 9 piastres ,(1 s lid) per lb., jam 3s 7d per 71b. tin. Eggs are the only things that are cheap ; they are 2^ piastres a dozen in the store, but when we go maneevring out on the desert the niggers sell them at 6 for 1 piastre (2^d). Nearly ever...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
GRAVE AND GAY. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 10 April 1915

j GRAVE AND GAY. Lady (rather difficult to please): I like this one, but I see it's printed in Germany. Salesman: Well, if you like it, ma dam, I wouldn't take too much notice of that statement; it's probably an other German lie. A gentleman in a Belfast restaur ant, the other day, thought he would have a joke with the waiter, and ask ed him if he had ever seen a sausage roll. "Say," said the waiter, "I have not only seen a sausage roll, but I haye seen a 'bircuit box, a table spoon, a chimney sweep, a chaiin link, a nose gay, a camera elide, a garden fence, a sword fish, and a wall flower." It was the composition lesson, and the teacher was impressing upon his class the importance of punctuation. "The position of commas," he said, "makes all the difference. Let me give you an illustration I recently read in my mor ng paper: 'The Kai ser says General French has a con temptible army.' Now, there is no doubt an error of punctuation occur red there. The passage should have read: 'The K...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Lost for Ever. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 10 April 1915

Lost for Ever. Little things can be very trying at times, especially when they happen to you. Mr. Fry thought something like this when, one wet morning, he could not find his umbrella. Like most married me<n, he believed in the maxim, "When in trouble, blame your wife." "I say, Mary," he shouted, "what on earth has happened to my new um brella? I brought it home last night, and now it's gone; and, of course, it's raining like mad 3" "Why, it's hardly raining at all!" said Mary. "But last night it was simply pouring when the vicar left, arad so I lent him your brolly." "What an asinine thing to do! I shall never see it again now, so I may as well buy another to-day!" "How can you be so wicked, Perci val? As if the vicar would stoop to stealing your umbrella!" "Stoop to stealing it, be hanged! I borrowed it from him a couple of months ago!"

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Changed Since Then. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 10 April 1915

Changed Since Then. Mrs. Brown was entertaining ' friends, and somewhere between an gel cake and chocolates the fair guests began to pay tribute to their respective husbands. "When we were first married," said Mrs. Brown, in her turn, with a re flective sigh, ,rBilly used to kiss me every time the train went through a tunnel." "How deliciously beautiful!" ecs tatically exclaimed one of the young women. "Does he still do it?" "Well, I should say not!" respond ed Mrs. Brown, sadly. "Every time we hit a tunnel now he takes a drink."

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Father Vaughan's Reply. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 10 April 1915

Father Vaughan's Reply. Of the numerous books that nave been issued dealing with, the war, none is more interesting than "What of To-day?" by Father Bernard ' Vaughan. Father Vaughan has always been very enthusiastic about our Army, a fact which once caused him to make a good joke. A few years ago a mili tant suffragette rushed at him and ; shrieked out: "Tell 'Bobs' the Army will never be right till you give wo men more liberty!" "Tell mothers," replied Father Vaughan quickly, "that the Army will never be right till they give us more infant-ry!"

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
"Your Loving Little Girl, Marguerite." [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 10 April 1915

"Your Loving Little Girl, Marguerite." Mr. Austin Dobson wrote in 1870 these moving lines on an incident which happened "Before Sedan," and is thus described: "When the dead were being buried a trace of blood led the searchers to a shady spot, where they found a French sergeant lying dead with his hand tightly clenched in death pressed to his lips. In his clenched hand was a scrap of paper, which they forced from it and read. "It was a letter from his little girl of five, which, when mortally wound ed, he had crawled here to read with the last light of his dying eyes, and it ran thus: " 'Dear Father,—I miss you so much. I miss you most morning and evening, when I used to kiss you. I try to be good, as you told me, and kind to mamma. — Your loving little girl, Marguerite.' "What was that white you touched, There by his side? Pager his hand had clutched Tight ere he died? Message or wish may be? Smooth out its folds and see. "See! She is sad to miss Morning and night His—her dead fath...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 10 April 1915

NEW 191 4-h.p. Single-cylinder Models, spring 1 frame, free engine - - - £§§ 3g h.p. Twins - - - £61 7-h.p. Twins - - - - £68 Nine Prominent Improvements on 1915 Models. Write to-day for illustrated Catalog, for warded post free. Sole District 'Agent, 123 Sturt St., Ballarat Tel. 505. Opp. Post Office. THE"$SAN WHO BUYS. Knows that his Money is Spent to the Best Possible Advantage. "T30LFE CYCLES give (he maximum st-renirth at a minimum of vveighfc, making, them j[\ easy to ride, and yet, by reason -of the flawless material used throughout their con struction, strong enough to outlast man)' more expensive-machines. THE BRAZING is Absolutely Guaranteed, and every inch of the machine has been made by Expert Cycle Specialists. -CALL and let us show - you the 1913 EOLFE— a better machine at the price does not exist. IE£ B RB. ROIbFS, 30 - ARMSTRONG STREET NORTH, BALLARAT. As the Bridal Portrait, has to last a lifetime the wise Bride will see that she Let US make the Easter Bridal Portra...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Why the Tears Fell. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 10 April 1915

Why the Tears Fell. The little girl stood by the letter box, weeping bitterly. "What the the matter, my child?" asked the elderly philanthropist, who came along. "I—I wanted to post two letters," I she sobbed, "and I hadn't any stamps. So—I dropped two pennies in the slot j —at the end—and the stamps won't 1 come out." Here the elderly philanthropist burst into tears. "Wh-what are you crying about?" the little girl asked. "I weep, my child," he said, wiping his eyes, "to think that a nice little girl like you should try to get money from me with such an old chestnut as j that."

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Bookish. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 10 April 1915

Bookish. Mr. Winston Churchill was once told by an acquaintance that a very dear friend was seriously ill with, what was feared might he appendici tis. He determined to write at once a note of sympathy, and he was just sitting down at his writing-table when word came that the illness turned out to be acute indigestion and not appen dicitis. He proceeded with his letter of sympathy, however. "Dear X he wrote, "I am sorry to hear that you are ill, but am glad to know that the trouble is with the 'table of contents' and not with the 'appendix'!" A lady recently selecting a hat at a milliner's, asked cautiously: "Is there anything about these feathers that might bring me into trouble with the Bird Protection So ciety?" "Oh, no, madam," said the milliner. "But did they not belong to some bird?" persisted the lady. "Well, madam," returned the millin er pleasantly, "these feathers are the feathers of a howl, and the howl, you know, madam, seein' as 'ow fond he is of mice, is more of a cat ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Souvenirs. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 10 April 1915

Souvenirs. The Kaiser recently paid a visit to Luxumbourg Hospital, where some French wounded were being cared for, and, seeing an officer lying on a bed, the War Lord offered him a red rose. Without even turning to take the flower the officer merely answered, "Merci, monsieur." A few days later the Kaiser went to Metz Hospital, and, presenting a red rose to a French private said: "Take this as a war souvenir." The soldier refused the token, and, throw ing back the bed cover and revealing an amputated leg, remarked: "That war souvenir is enough for me!"

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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