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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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LADY NICOTINE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

LADY NICOTINE. Women on the Continent are fast falling into the smoking habit. Among the higher classes indulgence in the narcotic has become almost universal. A woman of fashion no longer apolo- gises to her guests for lighting a cigarette after dinner, and even as an accompaniment to 5 o'clock tea a cigarette is frequently indulged in by fair Parisiennes. Russian ladies who inhabit the capital are largely responsible for the grow- ing taste for tobacco among the grande dames of Paris. The practice of smoking among ladies is very prevalent. In certain circles and the smart restaurants, however, many women may be seen with cigarettes. Among the middle and working classes it is safe to say that scarcely   a woman would think of smoking except for fun.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE CAISTER LIFEBOAT. HOW IT WAS LOST. A SURVIVOR'S GRAPHIC NARRATIVE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

THE CAISTER LIFEBOAT.   HOW IT WAS LOST.     A SURVIVOR'S GRAPHIC   NARRATIVE.   In the first number of "The World's News" full particulars were given of the loss of the Caister lifeboat during the recent severe gales on the British coast. Further particulars by the last English mail show that the only survivor who was able to attend the inquest on the victims of the disaster     was Edmund Haylett, a son of the deceased cox- swain, Aaron Haylett. He appeared much distressed, and on entering the court sat for a few moments with bowed bead, brushing away tears. Haylett gave a graphic description of the acci- dent. The crew of the lifeboat, he said, got up both sails, and sailed away all right. Before reaching the sandbank the mizzen sail blew adrift, and they had to wear round. Then they got both sails set again, and tacked to the beach. She came round as well as any boat could, and again heade...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOW SPAKE THE APOSTLES. EVIDENCE OF POLISH WITNESSES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

HOW SPAKE THE APOSTLES. EVIDENCE OF POLISH WITNESSES,   During the recent trial of Polish rioters at   Gnesen some curious evidence was given point-   ing to the intense feeling of the populace against   the introduction of the German language in re-   ligious instruction in the schools.   One of the Polish witnesses declared his belief   that Christ, being a Jew, spoke Polish to Peter   when he said "Thou art Peter, and on this rock   will I build my Church."   Another declared that the apostles and the   Virgin Mary spoke Polish.   A third witness, when told by the Crown   Prosecutor that the Pope, if he came to Gnesen,   would not speak Polish, replied: "Neither would the Holy Father speak German." There was a scene in court when a number of   Polish women broke out weeping, declaring tha...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FROM SHEPHERD TO MINISTER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

  FROM SHEPHERD TO MINISTER.   The Sir John M'Kenzie memorial cairn will be an imposing monument, and when erected on the highest point of the land near the deceased minis- ter's farm will form a gigantic landmark visible for miles around. The cairn, to be built of un- hewn stone, will be 68ft. high and circular in shape, towering from 30ft. in diameter at the base to 8ft. at the top. It will be surmounted by a Maltese cross 9ft. high, with wreath, both in stone, resting on a massive rough concrete block 6ft. high by 10ft. square. Sir John was Minister for Lands at the time of his death. He was the man who cut up the big estates in New Zealand, and made its land policy a success. He began life as a shepherd.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SERVIA'S QUEEN. QUARRELS WITH THE KING. AND ATTEMPTS SUICIDE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

SERVIA'S QUEEN.   QUARRELS WITH THE KING.       AND ATTEMPTS SUICIDE.       For some time past it has been rumored that King Alexander of Servia and Queen Draga have lived anything but happily. A Vienna telegram of the 2lst November states that the Servian Radical Journal "Zastawa," pub- lished at Neusatz, in Hungary, has received the following account of what happened the previous day in the Servian Konak:— King Alexander and Queen Draga have re- cently been living together less happily than in the first months of their wedded life, and a series of petty differences, which have been very en- tertaining for cynical courtiers, culminated yes- terday morning in on open quarrel between the Royal couple, conducted on both sides without restraint or self-respect. The scene was witnessed by three officers, who lunched at the palace, and the lady in attendance on the Queen. Regardless of the presence...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
STEEL RAILWAY TRUCKS. SUPERSEDE WOODEN ONES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

STEEL RAILWAY TRUCKS.   SUPERSEDE WOODEN ONES.   One of the new ideas in railway equipment which the English railway officials who have re- cently been touring America will take back with them to England and recommend for adoption on the English roads is freight cars made of pressed steel. Pressed steel cars have just begun to come into general use in the United States, and are every- where superseding the old wooden cars. It is announced that the Pennsylvania Railroad alone will spend £3,000,000 in adding 16,000 pressed steel freight cars to its rolling stock within a year. The New York, New Haven, and Hartford Road has ordered 30 locomotives and 1000 freight cars, and the Denver and Rio Grande Company orders 40 locomotives and 2000 freight cars of steel. The wooden freight car will soon be an obso- lete feature in railroad equipment in America. The steel freight car costs about the same as the wooden one, but it costs less for repairs and lasts much longe...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GUARDING A TREASURE SHIP. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

GUARDING A TREASURE SHIP.   The German liner Kaiser Wilhelm, which sailed from New York for Bremen on November 19, carried £1,400,000 worth of gold—one of the largest consignments on record. The gold consisted of about 885 bars, packed in boxes and kegs. It was sent to the ship from the United States Sub-Treasury, and unusual precautions were taken to ensure the safety of the treasure. It was deposited in a steel vault in the middle of the ship, and was constantly guarded by six of the crew in charge of an officer. Several gold bars were stolen on the Kaiser Wilhelm some months ago, and afterwards found concealed in a state-room. Since then special   precautions have been adopted.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AN ELECTRIC SHAVE. AN INGENIOUS INVENTION. THAT LED TO TROUBLE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

AN ELECTRIC SHAVE.   AN INGENIOUS INVENTION. THAT LED TO TROUBLE. A barber named Bontemps, who practises his   art in the Rue de Courcelles, Paris, recently ex-   cited the wonder of the neighborhood by invent-   ing a patent electric quick-shaving machine.   The instrument is a small rotary machine con-   sisting of a number of safety revolving blades   and a small lathering brush, with a reservoir   containing sufficient lather for one shave. The   operator holds the machine in his hand, and it is   set in motion by electricity, the current used   being a very weak one.   The machine seems to have worked well for   some days. People came to get shaved out of   curiosity, and the barber's business prospered   exceedingly.   The other day, however, a gentleman came in &n...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
STRANGE TURKISH SUPERSTITION. WITH SHOCKING SEQUEL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

  STRANGE TURKISH SUPERSTITION.         WITH SHOCKING SEQUEL.   Hanan, a village on the borders of Anatolia, Turkey, was the scene of a horrible tragedy a few weeks ago. There had been an epidemic in the district for some weeks, and as its ravages ever became greater, the villagers finally felt that it was the work of sorcerers, and, after a thorough investigation, they arrested a man named Aslan and his sister, and they openly charged them with being the direct cause of the said epidemic. The two prisoners avowed their innocence, but the mob insisted that they had been heard using incantations and other evil spells, and that their sole object in doing so was to invoke an epidemic. Without delay sentence was pronounced. As- lan was burned alive on an improvised scaffold, and his sister was mercilessly tortured with red-hot irons. News of the shocking crime was at once taken to the local authorities, and in...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FRIENDS HO LONGER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

FRIENDS NO LONGER. Helen: "I should like to do something that would make him miserable for life." Florence: "Why don't you marry him, dear?"

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A SAFE RECEPTACLE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

A SAFE RECEPTACLE.   —♦— A well-known member of the House of Com-   mons built himself a mansion in a remote part   of Hampshire on the confines of the New Forest.   Whilst the work was in progress he several times   on Friday afternoon observed the contractor's   clerk coming back from the railway station,   bringing with him a walking-stick, with label   addressed to his employer. Asking for explana-   tion of the mystery, the contractor touched a   spring in the handle, screwed off a headpiece,   and, turning the stick upside down, rolled out a   heap of sovereigns. The nearest local bank was   not convenient of approach in time for the weekly   pay. He accordingly had a stick made, the in-   terior hollowed out so as to take a sovereign,   and the precious freight, amounting...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Wreck of the Jaspar. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

The Wreck of the Jaspar. THREE HUNDRED FEET DOWN TO RESCUE THE CREW. During the recent British gales some exciting scenes were witnessed in Dover Bay, England. The Jasper, one of the large Admiralty Harbor Works barges, broke from a tug and was driven on the rocks, and washed up right against the cliffs. The tug Granville, which towed the lifeboat to her, sustained considerable damage, her port paddle-box being wrecked, while just forward of the paddle on the same side of the vessel there was large cavity where the ship's timbers had been smashed in by the enormous waves. So heavy were the seas that the lifeboat was unable to get close enough to rescue the Jas- par's crew. Seeing that the coastguards were preparing to endeavor to make a rescue from the cliffs, the tug and lifeboat returned to Dover. A rope ladder was staked to the summit of the cliff and run down a perpendicular face of over 300ft. This fearful descent, the risk of which was heightened by the heavy wind, which cause...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FISH THAT TALK. ENTERTAINING CONVERSATIONS AS THE ZOO. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

FISH THAT TALK. ENTERTAINING CONVERSATIONS AT THE ZOO. The latest contribution to the vocal distur- bances of the universe is a fish which has just arrived at the London Zoo. His name is Amia, and he belongs to the tribe of the bow fin, and it is not surprising to learn that he comes from America. When his keeper first took him into custody some weeks ago, Amia skirmished around in his tank for a while, and then, to the awful horror of his janitor, he said something three times that sounded like a feeble knock on a dinner-gong. The keeper looked at his watch, and found that as it was only twenty minutes to 3 it could not have been the Zoo clock, so he went on working. Then the Amias, of which, by the way, there are 15, began to feel at home, and presently they all joyously shouted "Pong" in chorus, and the keeper jumped around and gasped. When a visitor goes in and the talking fish   crowd up to the side of the tank and say "Bing" three times, the keeper explains that t...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOW THE POOR OF PARIS LIVE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

HOW THE POOR OF PARIS LIVE. "How the poor live" is a subject which in- variably crops up as the winter days come upon us (says the Paris "Messenger"), when climatic conditions drive them for shelter to any hole or cover where cheap comfort may be obtained. In London the Adelphia arches were famed for a most wonderful collection of human waifs and strays, and Paris, it appears, has something analogous at Bagnolet, where there is a mar- vellous shelter called by a French journalist "The Subterranean Palace of the Poor." It has been produced by extensive excavations under a hill whose soil yields material for making plas- ter. Large fires are kept going to burn this natural production and produce the plaster. Around these glowing furnaces congregate homeless men, women, and children, undisturbed, if they behave, by the Paris police. For years the undermining of this hill of cozy comfort has been going on, and pillars have been left standing at regular intervals to pre vent the top fall...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BURGLARS IN POMPEII. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

BURGLARS IN POMPEII. While excavating in a house at Pompeii, the workmen recently found a beautiful painting; to which the title "Venus at Her Toilette" has been given by Italian connoisseurs, who have made a careful examination of it. They say that it cer- tainly represents the Goddess of Love arraying herself in the morning, and that around her are her attendants and female slaves. Near it were discovered several minor paintings, as well as other relics of considerable value. At a little distance were unearthed the skeletons of six men, and, as one of them held tightly a large vase filled with pieces of money, the assumption is that they were burglars, who had taken ad- vantage of the consternation in the doomed city to rush into this wealthy man's house; and who had themselves been overtaken by the destroy- ing fire before they could escape.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Diggers Plot. TO SEIZE KLONDYKE. ORDER OF THE MIDNIGHT SUN. THE SKAGWAY FENIANS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

A Diggers Plot. TO SEIZE KLONDYKE. ORDER OF THE MIDNIGHT SUN. THE SKAGWAY FENIANS.   Under date November 22 the "Daily Express" publishes the following interesting particulars about a plot which certain diggers had on foot to overthrow Canadian rule in Klondyke. The following telegram has been received in New York from Seattle:— "The 'Times' to-day publishes an account con- firming in every way the previous story of a conspiracy, hatched by certain miners with a view to an attempt to overthrow Canadian autho- rity at Klondyke.   "The 'Times' asserts that it has in its posses- sion the documents and seals of the Order of the Midnight Sun, a secret society, organised for the sole purpose of accomplishing the overthrow of Canadian rule in the goldfields." Mr. C. D. Newton, a member of the Atlin Board of Trade, who had just arrived at Victoria (B.C.), confirmed the report of a conspiracy among the miners at Skagway. Three Irish-American miners who are in Lon- d...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE ENGLISH PEOPLE'S LOVE FOR AMERICA. AN AMBASSADORIAL VIEW. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

THE ENGLISH PEOPLE'S LOVE FOR AMERICA.         AN AMBASSADORIAL VIEW.     Mr. Choate, who was the American Ambassa-     dor at the British Court, speaking in New York     on November 19, referring to the English     people, said:—   "As your representative, I have certainly been     treated with the utmost respect and considera-     tion. No man could find himself in a community     more disposed to manifest loyal friendship than     I found the people of London and England to be.     I soon found that they had little use for the     gush and chaff which sometimes seems to go   well here. I found that the vigorous and manly   &nbs...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"If You Move, I Fire!" REMARKABLE SCENE IN A BLOOMSBURY OFFICE. A MAN FROM AUSTRALIA. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

"If You Move, I Fire!"   REMARKABLE SCENE IN A BLOOMSBURY OFFICE. A MAN FROM AUSTRALIA.   Mr. James Neale, an architect, carrying on   business in Bloomsbury-square, London, de-   scribed to the Bow-street magistrate on Novem-   ber 15 how William Edge, a student of 25, "used threats with a loaded revolver, thereby causing him bodily fear and terror." He said Edge called at his office on Wednes-   day with a lady, whom he introduced as Mme.   Costello, and made some inquiries about a flat   which was to let. Witness asked the usual ques-   tion if the parties were respectable, and Edge   replied, "Certainly." The next morning he   again called, and told witness that he had asked   some insulting questions about the wife of Mr.   Costello.   "At that time," continued the witness, "we   were s...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A SKINLESS KING OF ENGLAND. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

A SKINLESS KING OF ENGLAND.   It is of interest at this time to note that   there has actually been a skinless King of England. In a scarce historical volume on the Magna Charta and the Statutes, published in 1856, mention is made of the circumstance under the heading "Nomina regum et corum coro- natis." Among the notices of births is this:—     "Richardus II., filius Ed. Principis Walliae, natus sine pelle et nutritus in pellibus caprium, incepit regnare xxiii Junii, anno Domini mccclxxvii." (Richard Second, son of Edward, Prince of Wales, born without skin, and reared on the skins of goats, began to reign June 23, 1377.)      

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
YET LIGHT IS THERE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

  YET LIGHT IS THERE.   At a depth of only 200 fathoms, it is said, the   light of the unclouded sun, penetrating the ocean,   is reduced to equality with the starlight of a clear night on the surface. At more profound depths   the sunlight is entirely extinguished. Yet there   are both light and color in the abysses, and at the   bottom of the sea. The light is of a phosphores-   cent origin, and in general the fixed marine forms   of life are not behind their free-swimming allies   in light-emitting powers. The colors of deep-sea   animals are both brilliant and varied.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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