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Elephind.com contains 658,475 items from Columbia Daily Spectator, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 3,057 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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School of Mines. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 March 1879

School of Mines. MR. T. E. ALLEN, 80, has left the School. MEMBERS of 'Bl, assisted by others, propose to give a performance of "Pinafore," probably at the Union League Theatre. NEVADA has $600,000 in her treasury, and the people are urging the building of an insane asylum and a school of mines with it. — N. Y. Sun. A PARTY of gentlemen in 'BO desire to get eating match with any of the other classes. They have one man they will back to a considerable amount on buns. THE sum for the boat has now reached the sum of one hundred and forty-two dollars in the School of Mines. This is not quite as much as was promised, but is very good, considering the small number who are interested in boating. AN interesting and well executed series of metallurgical drawings has recently appeared on the walls of Prof. Egieston's lecture-room. They are the work of the students, and have been prepared during a number of years under Prof. Egieston's direction. THE SPECTATOR offers five dollars ($5) for the ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
School of Law. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 March 1879

School of Law. IN response to a petition made by the students in the junior class, that the Friday sessions of the School might be devoted to the completion of the dictation lectures, the Moot Court sittings were brought to an end on Friday, February 28th. The following decisions were then rendered : Case 14. Since the vane was put on by permission, the nephew had the right to regard it as personal property, and consequently to remove it. Hence, if the nephew is silent, it goes to the heir, and the executor has no power of removal, as the nephew is the only party who can claim it against the heir. Case 15. As between landlord and tenant, the courts adopt, a liberal rule in favor of the tenant. The removal can be made, the flag-staff coming under the head of fixtures for purposes of domestic use and ornament. IN the two hour Friday dictation lectures Mr. Carpenter is supported by a strong chorus of students, the burden of whose refrain is " Please repeat." Perti- nent remarks in an u...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE COLLEGE WORLD. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 March 1879

THE COLLEGE WORLD. Cornell:— Only about one-fourth of the State scholarships are in use. It is proposed to organize a " French Club," for improvement in French conversation, with Prof. Roehrig as president and instructor. So far this year 493 students have registered. It is not probable that the number will reach 500 this year. The eighteen or twenty competitors for places in the Woodford "six" will begin their contest early next week. Prof. Wilson's lecture on " Mesmerism " was a most interesting discourse, in which the Professor gave his own well-weighed opinions of the subject. The Yale, Harvard, Princeton and Columbia gymnasiums are over-crowded while Cornell's has only an occasional visitor. You will regret this ere long, messieurs oarsmen. — Era. The Freshman Literary Society, after considerable negotiations with various other literary societies, has by a unanimous vote united itself with the Curtis. The Era suggests that " the metallic fibre —which by the way never has a fair...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE LIBRARY. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 March 1879

THE LIBRARY. HARPER'S NEW MONTHLY MAGAZINE now in its fifty-eighth volume comes every month brighter and newer than ever. The March number is profusely illustrated. Of the first seventyeight pages only seven do not have an illustration on them. It opens with an excellent article on the "Present Tendencies of American Art" which speaks of it " as a school of promise than one of achievement." It gives a " broad outline of a few of the leading artists and tendencies now before the public as the promoters of an advance to another stage in our national pictorial art." Among the numerous other articles, light and serious, we find " A Few Sea-Birds," " The Coast Survey," " The English Home of the Washingtons," "The English in India," "The 'Tom' Side of Macauley," and excellent installments of " Old Dutch Masters," " Berg und Thai " and "Young Mrs. Jardine." The various departments at the end are up to their usual standard.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
OUR EXCHANGES. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 March 1879

OUR EXCHANGES. SINCE it devolves upon an exchange editor to read through those contemporaries that he intends to criticize, when the turn of the Crimson comes we are always pleased, feeling sure we will not fall asleep while perusing it. We like its plan of short editorials especially when they are so well written as those before us. " Une Lettre Persane " is fair, and "Low-water Mark " is a clever bit of satirical humor at some faults of the Marking System. The " Yale Graduate of '69 " gives us another dose and prospect of still more. This gentleman favors the American Henley as he thinks that would prevent the Yale-Harvard race at NewLondon or elsewhere, from being handicapped " bythe simultaneous presence upon the river of any other crews whatever." Two excellent pages of " Brevities" preceed the advertising sheets and close a number, that taken all in all is creditable to its editors. THE Trinity Tablet has an exterior that prepossesses one in its favor. The last number, Februar...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
SHAVINGS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 March 1879

SHAVINGS. U T A 7HAT does your husband do ?" asked the V V census man. "He aint doin' nothing at this time of the year," replied the young wife. "Is he a pauper?" asked the census man. She blushed scarlet to the ears. " Law, no !" she exclaimed, somewhat indignantly. "We ain't been married more'n six weeks." —Hawkeye. Professor, lecturing on psychology —" All phenomena are sensations. For instance, that leaf appears green to me. In other words, I have a sensation of greenness within me." Of course no harm was meant but still the class would laugh. — Chronicle. A PROFESSOR in Cornell lecturing on the effect of the wind in some Western forests, remarked: "In travelling along the road I even sometimes found the logs bound and twisted together to such an extent that a mule couldn't climb over them, so I went around." — Ex. A BOSTONIAN of several years' standing, chuckful of culture and aesthetic taste, got an engagement to edit a Toronto evening paper. Shortly afterwards one of the staf...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 April 1879

The Columbia Spectator. Published Semi-Monthly by the Students of Columbia College. VOL. IV. No. IV. NEW YORK, APRIL Ist, 1879. WHOLE NO. 33. Board of Editors, 1879-1880. WILLIAM S. SLOAN, 'Bl, Managing Editor. WILLIAM F. MORGAN, 'BO, Business Editor. WILLIAM H. TAYLOR, 'BO. WILLIAM B. MCVICKAR, 'BO. REGINALD H. SAYRE, 'Bl. GEORGE H. TAYLOR, 'Bl. FRANK L. HENRY, 'B2. C. E. CALDWELL, B. A., S. of L. C. D. STARR, 'Bl, S. of M. A. GERALD HULL, 'B2, S. of M. TERMS. Per annum, (18 numbers.) in advance, - $2.00. Single copies, - - - - - -15 cts. Remittances by mail should be addressed to WILLIAM K. OTIS, 'B2, Treasurer, No. 108 West 34th Street, N. Y. Exchanges, contributions, and all other communications should be addressed to THE COLUMBIA SPECTATOR, Columbia College, N. Y. Students and graduates of the various departments of Columbia are requested to contribute articles, verses, letters, and information.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CURRENT TOPICS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 April 1879

CURRENT TOPICS. THE freshman class, at a meeting about a month ago, decided to have a class-supper, and appointed a committee to attend to the matter. This committee thought it would be beneath eighty-two's dignity to have their supper anywhere save Delmonico's, so they decided on this place, and posted up a notice to the effect that tickets could be obtained from the committee for five dollars, (wine not included.) The consequence is no applications for tickets have been made, and the supper has fallen through. The idea of trying the restaurants or hotels, where the other classes for the last two or three years have been content to feast at the rate of three dollars, and under, has evidently never occurred to this committee. We advise them if they desire to see their class-supper really held, and that successfully, to make further inquiries and retrace the steps they have so unwisely taken. Freshmen always have three bright examples before them in the senior, junior and sophomore c...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
An Inter-Collegiate Press Association. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 April 1879

An Inter-Collegiate Press Association. IN the United States there are about two hundred and fifty institutions of learning that are called colleges. Nearly two hundred of these have their representative paper. One of these, Yale, is the mother of four journals ; two, Harvard and California University, issue three ; and four, Columbia, Cornell, Princeton and Syracuse University, support two rivals. Every year, we might say every month, new ventures which in the majority of cases live and flourish enter the field. Such a number of newspapers should and most certainly do exert a great influence over a laro-e numbers of readers. There have been three Inter-Collegiate associations already, two of which now exist, and we would sugge st to our fellow-editor the propriety of a fourth, namely, an Inter-Collegiate Press Association. In effect it would be merely an Annual Convention of Collegiate Editors, assembling together for mutual advice, and we sincerely believe would be most beneficial ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Our Boating Programme this Season. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 April 1879

Our Boating Programme this Season. OUR first public appearance will probably be in the Harlem Regatta on June 12th. As the regatta this year will be thrown open to all amateurs, we will be represented, in all likelihood, by Boat Club, and not University crews. Following this, the Blue and White will be found entered for the eight and four oared college races in the M A. A. O. Regatta, which will be held July 4th, on the Hudson. Here we hope to meet Princeton, Cornell, Wesleyan, Rutgers, and any other colleges that feel inclined to enter. The N. A. A. O. regatta follows on July gth and 10th, at Saratoga. Whether we will be present there is extremely doubtful. It will be remembered that when our four was at Henley last year it was protested from this side, and by the N. A. A. O. The Association that offered a money prize for amateurs at Watkins, where our crew naturally refused to participate, tried to make out that college undergraduates were professionals, and as such protested them...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE ALUMNI DINNER. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 April 1879

THE ALUMNI DINNER. ON an evening during the month of January, at 7 o'clock, the Union Square Hotel acted the part which some astronomers have depicted for our sun. By a process of attraction, a multitude of intellectual meteors were gathered within its area, and produced a species of internal photosphere, whose splendor Sol himself could not outshine. There were " prominences " too, some of them very lofty. But we find that it will not do to pursue our astronomical simile any further, for it might lead to the conclusion, Di prohibeant, that the prominences were composed of hydrogen gas. The ascent of Parnassus is known to be difficult and it has been found that purely intellectual viands are sadly attenuating if exclusively employed. Hence, before proceeding to the real work and enjoyment of the evening, and to ensure the possession of a corpus sanum , attention was directed to the wants of the latter from half-past seven to ten o'clock. During this interval, the champions of the ev...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
"'TIS SWEET." [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 April 1879

"'TIS SWEET." 3 ' I 1 1S sweet to hear in Fritz's beer saloon, 1 The clinking of the glass in friendly toast, The while the thirsty soph-more like a loon, Calls for a schooner on mine host. 'Tis sweet to see a freshman when yet green Ascend the campus, with a plug and cane, And hear the war-cry, Fresh ! when this is seen, Raised by the soph, the freshman's bane. 'Tis sweet to hear along the sounding halls, The mellow " saw my leg off" thrice a day, 'Tis sweet to hear Steve's whistle when it calls Each day at one, from books and chalk away ; 'Tis sweet to view in Chapel every morn Old Stevens dear and prepossing face, 'Tis sweet to list when on the air is born, The rounded notes of his sonorous bass.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
*ONLY A VASSAR GIRL. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 April 1879

*ONLY A VASSAR GIRL. " O, keep me innocent, Make others great." — Queen Caroline Matilda of Denmark. PREFACE TO CHAPTER X. I left my tale on the African isle, Where " the fire was built for roasting me," THAT portion of my readers who delight in the cheap, sensational literature of the day, (alas their number is legion), were highly delighted, and I received many notes of which the following is a characteristic specimen : " Dear Cornicula : Bully Boy —Roast him, Roast him. All the boys." From the more intelligent portion of my readers, I received such notes as this : " Sir:— If you allow your hero to be roasted, I shall refuse to take the SPECTATOR henceforth. VULPECULA." The Editors have warned me to be brief; so I shall pursue a perfectly neutral course, and then abandon novel writing until America ceases to be a free country. CHAPTER X. The fire was built for roasting me. All bound, I stood awaiting my doom. Three savages approached, but, ere they had taken two strides towards me...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CORRESPONDENCE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 April 1879

CORRESPONDENCE. Eds. of the Spectator : NOT content with the Burial expenses and a new class-eight, the sophomore class, to which I have the honor of belonging, at their last meeting, had a class-supper proposed. The resolution was tabled, and may be definitely settled even before this is in print. In case this has not been done, let me make a few comments. This seems to me a rather risky venture as three schemes of this kind in one year would make every man's college expenses burdensome. It is also moderately sure of ruining one of these, if not two. The class-supper is the least important and undoubtedly would not prove successful, at this juncture. For this reason I do most strongly protest against it, and I am sure the majority of the class that could, and would afford to go to such supper agree with me. I hope that the resolution may be either allowed to die a natural death " on the table, " or that it may be mercilessly killed in a regular parliamentary way. OUERELOSUS. Messrs...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
SPORTING COLUMN. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 April 1879

SPORTING COLUMN. Athletics. MA. C. —This club will hold its opening handicap . games on the Club Grounds, Saturday, April 12, commencing at 4 P. M., consisting of the following games: 100-yard run, run, and i-mile walk. An entrance fee, not returnable, of 25 cents must accompany each and every entry. Entries close April sth, I. C. A. A. A Convention of the Inter-Collegiate Athletic Association will be held at the Fifth Avenue Hotel, New York, at 10 o'clock A. M., on Thursday, the 3d of April, 1879. Each college of the Association is requested to send two delegates. The time and the place of the next field-meeting, with numerous other matters, will be decided. H. J. F. PORTER, J. W. MCNULTY, J. W. PRYOR, Executive Committee. Boating. COLUMBIA :— Mr. Chas. S. Boyd, formerly of the Columbia crew, has been elected trustee of the St. John Rowing Club, of New Orleans. CORN ELL :—lt has been decided to enter a freshman eight, and a University four in the N. A. A. O. The four will comprise ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
ABOUT COLLEGE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 April 1879

ABOUT COLLEGE. OWING to the increased demand for the last number of the SPECTATOR, some more copies are wanted, for which 10 cents will be given at this office. A FRESHMAN wishes to know why the last hour is always sixty-five minutes long. Morgan, 'BO, and Rogers, 'B2 are the latest additions to the choir. ON the 20th of last month, the freshmen left the gymnasium to commence work on the river. IT is expected that Dr. Chandler's lecture on March 16th. will be of great assistance to 'Bl gemote is adding, to its list of members. NOT long ago, one of our editors overheard the following interesting dialogue : First soph.—" Have you been to see Mary Anderson ?" Second soph.—" No, I really must go. How many miles is she now ? IT IS said that the following excuse was handed to the President some time since, by a certain student. "' I have married a wife, and therefore I cannot come. I pray thee have me excused.'" THE freshman are in trouble about their classsupper. some of them thinking th...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
The Transit of Venus [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 April 1879

The Transit of Venus G.S observed by tlj£ junior clcxss once ciu/ee)^. i slcx-vs cove 'out o [ co m Lo ("tie J i/nturs l"htnr homWv \?> ."e d IWo' waul" ot syjcxoe. iX-VI Seldom to&uftvev, tut tt\i$ is i)\e <i xce u ti o v-\^£c,

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
School of Mines. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 April 1879

School of Mines. PROFESSOR LOISEAU met with a severe accident on the Elevated Railway which prevented him from lecturing for several days. He is now recovered, and sustains no permanent injury. THE warm weather has come, and the fourth year man no longer saves his crucibles to fire at freshmen, since they now avoid using the assay laboratory as a passage-way. THE cigarette class have lectures every afternoon in the Cafe Moran ; they generally succeed in reducing the atmosphere of that retreat into a fine imitation of fog. Don't the By-Laws say something about smoking on the College grounds ? EIGHTY-TWO has lost one of its best and most popular members in Mr. McVickar. This gentleman had rendered himself deservedly so to both the students and profe c sors, and it is with sincere regret that we are obliged to part with him. IN our last issue we made an assertion which we are now compelled to withdraw. We said, and in the innocence of our trustfulness believed, that the new lights plac...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
School of Law. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 April 1879

School of Law. THE annual debate between the Barnard and Columbia Law Clubs, which took place March 13th, was very largely attended. Prof. Dwight presided. The subject of debate was " Resolved, that a divorce from the marriage contract, valid in the state where it is decreed, should be valid in every other state." The Barnard Club maintained the affimative, the Columbia Club, the negative. The disputants were: Messrs. Sander, Orcutt, Kenyon, and Davis of the Barnard, and Messrs. Agar, Hobbie, Ives, and Greene, of the Columbia. Some very able arguments were made on both sides. Prof. Dwight gave his decision for the affimative. THE seniors are understood to be working a fabulous number of hours per diem in anticipation of their examination. THE one-year-men are still, as it were, suspended between heaven and earth ; unable to attain the favored position of the seniors in the regular course, they find it hard to resign themselves to the common lot of applicants for admission to the bar...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE COLLEGE WORLD. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 April 1879

THE COLLEGE WORLD. Bowdoin:— Rumor says we are to have a new gymnasium before next fall term. The following juniors have been appointed to speak at the senior and junior exhibition, at the end of the term : Chapman, Edwards, Goukling and Winter. A sophomore recently gave the class a point in Geography, by stating that Wales was a country on the north of England. We are pleased to be able to announce that the interest in boating is still as great as last term. The boating men have worked almost daily in the gymnasium, through the winter. The officers of the Boat Club have lately met and talked over the outlook, and report that everything looks favorable for Bowdoin to send a crew to compete either in the National Association of Amateur Oarsmen, or to measure blades with some other college. Cornell:— Rifle practice will be begun early next term. Let everyone interested in such matters join the riflemen's association and possibly we may send forth a very creditable representative colle...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
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