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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1897

n?j Tifv ri&xgpvy jps v'"''r ""rTj Tyr ryy-pin y i i. " ME INDIAN ADVOCATE. 1? Mobilians were far from being tame savages. They were like all Indians, merciless and blood-thirsty. As said before, De Soto landed amongst them in 1540, with 800 men. Twelve priests, intent on Christianizing the red-faces, volunteered to accom pany him through these wild and then unknown regions. This hardy band proceeded northwesterly, meeting at every step with insurmountable ob stacles from both the nature of the country and its sole inhabitants, the beasts and savages. Their advancing ranks were greeted only with death. Some few Creeks were converted but to be murdered by their heathen brethren. Each and every white man alike, whether pagan or Christian, priest or layman, was doomed to the bloody im plements of death the tomahawk and scalping knife. Nevertheless, there were, in after years, zealous mission aries who jeopardized their lives for the conversion of the those heathen abori gines of Am...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1897

( f if" wywvTww 18 rfiE INDIAN ADVOCATE. t!ii.-ijK; public, is maintained to this hour with like result. "Had it not been for this opposition, there would not exist this day a brave on the warpath nor a savage in the wilderness. Even now, the Catholic Church craves permission to begin anew. She engages to end the border warfare, evangelize and convert the red man and fit him for the duties of peace, for any office in the country from the mechanic's bench to the throne of the bishop or the chair of the President, without the aid of a dollar from the treasury or a rifle from the armory, on one simple condition to be let alone. The very savages crave it; but in vain. They are expected to embrace Chris tianity at the persuasion of a speculat ing preacher with a Bible in one hand and a government grant for their land in the other. Firewater, the rifle and legalized robbery are the weapons of his spiritual warfare, varied by a bar rel of bad meat, a sack of musty flour and a shoddy blanke...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1897

" V,''V7Vy "tfTCT"'''"' tr-l-fr me Indian advocate. io ing commerce with the whites were framed, in consequence of which this nation to-day has many thriving busi ness centers. The most important are: Muskogee, t Eufaula, Sapulpa, Checo tah, Wagoner and Tulsa. Already in 1880 the Creeks had 65, 000 acres in cultivation and owned over 100,000 head of cattle. All their means of subsistence depended on their labor in civilized pursuits, hence the large aggregate of land cultivated at such an early date. They possessed 38 schools with a yearly allowance of $30,000; while over twenty young Creeks were being educated in the States. At tho present day the Creeks rank second among the five civilized tribes of the Indian Territory. Their progress in civilization has, indeed, been remarkable. This is due to the strict and particular attention that is given to the education of the Creek youth by the Muskogee Government. The following paragraph ably confirms our statement. It is taken from the ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1897

TTT" -"nWT'. V- ' yr-WTWjWTi 4 "Sf T' " ' 20 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. JJKZTYJ aside for him, the Choctaw nation. May he bring many converts to the faith. Now a word about the present Creek form of government. The nation is ruled by a principal chief and a second chief. Isparichas is the name of its present principal chief. He is a venerable old full-blood Indian, and resides at Okmulgee. His advisory board is composed of a body of repre sentatives called the house of warriors and a senate called the house of kings. The officials are elected ever' four years. Each citizen, it matters not where he may be living, hns to go to his own town to vote. They have no jails and seem to need none. Military and police duties are performed by a body of men called the Lighthorse. All cases in which white citizens are involved are referred to the United States Government for settlement. L. C, O.S.B. MOTTO FOR THE NEW YEAR. I asked the New Year to give me some motto sweet, A rule of life by which to gui...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1897

TTTyr 'iVWW'dpy ' i1 wfjr ?yr-,r THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 21 A our great centers of education. So well did they act their individual parts that many of the reverend clergy were deeply impressed, thus showing con clusively that the work of the Sisters bore fruit worthy the praise that was freely given. The following day, at ten o'clock, the large and beautiful church wit nessed a ceremony that heretofore had never taken place within hundreds of miles. The procession, headed by cross bearer and acolytes, was the most im posing ever witnessed. The students of the college, the pupils of the academy with the Sisters, followed by the reli gious to the number of thirty or forty, after whom, in order of rank, came the visiting clergy, secular and regular. The Abbot-elect, robed in rich gold vestments, with the Rt. Rev. Frowenus Conrad, O.S.B., of Conception, Mo., on his right, and the Rt. Rev. Ignatius Conrad, O.S.B., of Spielerville, Ark., on his left, moved onward in deep recollection, follow...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1897

raw- nwv!nv:" iTWfiJP'3"'"" 22 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. who will aid and encourage virtue, since they have learned to practice it in the school of the monastery. Let us, then, rejoice and be glad that from the mustard seed such a magni ficent tree has grown, spreading its branches throughout this vast diocese, gladdening our good bishop and prom ising to make many rejoice in the day that the sons of St. Benedict first came into these desert wilds. At the offertory the orchestra com posed of the religious of the Abbey rendered very select music, the compo sition of Dom Gregory Gerer, O.S.B., a young and promising cleric; assisted by the pupils of St. Mary's Academy. When the newly blessed Abbot was conducted by the Bishop to his throne and seated thereon, the vast assemblage was moved by a spectacle most touch ing. As the Rt. Rev. orator had stated, the new Abbot is dearly beloved by all. France, his native sky, could not hold him longer, hence to these distant parts he came to teach men...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1897

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 23 BE KIND TO ONE ANOTHER. If only people would give to the liv ing some of that affection which they bestow so lavishly upon them when they are dead, what a different world this would be ! Even a little of that which was sculptured on the cold marble would, if breathed from the warm lips, have made many a one happy for life. One of the beliefs of the Seneca Indians is that they can send their love by a bird to their dead ones. When a maiden dies, they imprison a young bird until it first begins to sing. They then load it with kisses and caresses, and set it at liberty over the grave of the maiden who had died, believing that it will not fold its wings or close its eyes until it has flown to the spirit-land, and deliv ered its precious burden of affection to the loved and lost; and it is not uncom mon for twenty or thirty birds to be loosed over the same grave. Many and many a husband and wife, many a broth er and sister, would give all they have if only they co...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1897

-lUUHll 24 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. ry and generous, but each man pays for his own wine, maccaroni and cigars. They would as soon think of transfer ring to each other their washerwomen's bills. The preposterous fashion of "treat ing" is responsible for the terrible drunkenness in America. There would be little need of temperance societies if this prenicious and insidious habit were abolished. It is, taken all in all, the most ridiculous, the most unreason able, and the most pestilent custom that ever laid its tyrannical hand on civilized beings. MISCELLANEOUS. An important question must soon be decided how are the Catholic Indian schools to be maintained? The good work accomplished by these schools is known to all who are familiar with the history of the Indians for the past few years. If Congress is wise and desires to prepare the Indians for citizenship and render an Indian uprising an im possibility, it will not hesitate to authorize a continuance of the contracts with these schools....

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1897

-Tr-'rrf,,rTipj7WF'SfCOT "TrjTfljv' DflE iNDIAN ADVOCATE. 25 WINTFR. Rosy Summer speeds away, With her charms so bright and gay ; A beauteous vision swiftly fled, She is numbered with the dead. Ghostlike Winter now has come, Mantled in her robe of gloom ; She kisses earth with icy breath, And nature feels the clasp of death. Pursue not then life's fleeting joys, Seek not thou vain earthly toys ; Like Summer flowers, they'll fade away, And in the tomb's cold shade decay. Ta-wan-dah The Last of the Pecos. A LEGEND. It was the month of May. The month of the flowers was on its decline ; a soft breeze, perfumed with the sweet odors of the pino real, the green oak, and the flowers of the mountain, swept over the solitude. The heavens were cloudless; only a light fog was unfolding itself as a white drapery over the valley, and pointed to the course of the Rio Pecos. It was the hour when the beautiful night opens to the evening breeze its many-colored calyx. Silence extended afar by degrees...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1897

-srvrywr tyrnnK-v rvi mmvnwnmmmmi 2G THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. wmmmmmmmmmmmm from twenty to twenty-five. The alti tude of this valley is, on an average, not less than six thousand three hun dred feet. The mesa, or tableland, on the right bank of the river rises ab ruptly to nearly two thousand feet high er, and the sierras, which bound the valley on the north, rise to ten thousand feet; and even the Santa Fe Baldez, seen at the extreme north, exceeds twelve thousand feet. The Rio Pecos, a fine mountain-stream of limpid water and filled with speckled trout, in the upper part of the valley hugs closely the mountains of Tecolote, and then runs almost directly south until it emp ties in the Rio Grande five degrees more to the south, in the state of Texas. Nearly in the center of the valley, two miles west of the river, there rises a narrow, semi-circular cliff, or mesilla, over the bed of a stream known as the Arrojo of Pecos, which is not to be con founded with the river proper, but is a tr...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1897

'Tir THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 21 sel among the Pocos. At the age of nineteen ho married Ta-wan-dah, the daughter of his benefactor, whom he had previously instructed in her relig ion, since they were bereft of all spirit ual comfort. The marriage ceremony was performed by Father Matteo in a missionary journey he made from Texas to the Navajo Indians. Already the drum-drum was heard ; the Pecos had put on the last touch of red ; the serpent was hissing in his estufa, licking his sides with his tongue, his fangs waiting for his usual meal. But where was Ta-wan-dah ? No one had seen her; she had fled to the woods with her babe. Vengeance was vowed by the nation, and, to appease the evil spirit below, two infants were thrown into the estufa. The dance was more noisy than ever ; the serpent was riot ing in good cheer. Acryisheard: "The Apaches!" All is confusion at the pueblo ; men rush for their bows and arrows ; women and children scream. It is too late. The Apaches from the brush of the R...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1897

.--r-TJ. Wf. HBWPfff! 28 tfHE INDIAN ADVOCATE. .-, v-'jr" mother rushed to him, and, taking him tenderly in her arms, pressed him to her heart. But, 0 poor mother I the cry of the little one had been heard by the fiends lying in wait for him and for thee. A rustling of leaves is heard ; a number of Apaches rush upon her like a pack of tigers. The warwhoop is sounded ; Ta-wan-dah is dying with ter ror. They say to one another : "Here they are!" They keep coming six, eight, ten! Their blankets are covered with blood, wolf tails drag at their heels, ferocity is depicted upon their savage faces. All frighten Ta-wan-dah their costume, their language, their looks. They are the same Apaches who spilt the blood of her husband. The brigands, persuaded that the woman was not alone, prepared the "post of the torture" to make her de clare where her companions were hid. They lit a large fire of resinousbranches, tied her hands behind her back, and, binding her to the torture-post, com menced the...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1897

'm,iSifil(fi YVm-SfTf TT' 7 i"'T'w1 7 ' ' "A V ' ' ' . .TV , THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 29 IWWjP'ipw PPWWW '' Apache, he turned upon her his pier cing eyes and horrid face. "Woman," said he, "thou art in my power; thy life or thy death is in my hands. Not a word, not a cry, or my navaja puts an end to thy wicked life. Consent to become my wife, and I will adopt thy boy, I will take care of him, and I will bring thee, my bride, to my mountain home, and thou shalt be the light of my hut." "Never will I marry the murderer of my husband." " Consent at once or thou art dead." "Never!" Snatching her boy from her arms, he took him by one foot and, dangling him head downward, prepared to dash his brains out upon the rocks. The wom an, terrified, besought him in vain. The cries of the little one could not soften his heart. "Thou seest, woman; consent to become my wife or thy boy is dead." " Mother of mercy, have pity on him and me! Groat Spirit, save him and me!" Suddenly uttering a great cry, the...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1897

swr WWW"' 80 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. "TVf Tj 3?VpScl ofpUrgatory, HOW MANY SWEET REMINISCENCES THIS TITLE RECALLS TO A CHRISTIAN MIND. THE SOUL'S APPEAL. Havo pity on roe, h&vo pity on mo, at lonst you, my frionds, bocauso tlio liaud of tho Lord hath touched mo.- Jon xix., 21. In the name of the God the Father Almighty, Who made all men to be A little below the choirs of Angels Help, friend ! 0 help thou me ! In the name of God's sole-begotten Son Who, in His clemency, Paid with His Blood my ransom and thine Help, friend! 0 help thou me! In the name of God the Paraclete, Who dwells e'en now in thee, And peace and free-given grace imparts Help, friend ! 0 help thou me! In the name of her in whom the Father A Daughter dear doth see, The Son a Mother, a Spouse the Spirit Help, friend! 0 help thou me! In the name of that faithful Angel Guide Who urgeth thee to flee From sin, that feeds the flames I endure Help, friend ! 0 help thou me ! In the name of our friendship in days agone, Frie...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1897

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 31 - , s S that God should punish our pride and self-seeking by plunging us into that abyss of forgetfulness, which awaits us immediately after death, enveloping us' forever in its deep and impenetrable shade. Desolation or abandonment is itself one of the most terriblo of God's chas tisements. When suffering and sorrow close around us, and we find some gentle, compassionate hearts to weep with us, our tears, bitter though they may be, are still mingled with sweetness and consolation. But to suffer alone to be abandoned by all and left utterly for lorn, without finding a single hand stretched forth to succor us without hearing the sound of a single voice en couraging us to hope is a suffering too great to bo endured. When Job wept over his miseries, and Jeremias over the ruins of Jerusalem, the most dolorous cry that escaped their hearts was this: "I sought for one who would console me and I found none." When Almighty God wished His Di vine Son, the Victim of ex...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1897

32 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. they look in vain," and the aged fisher men still recount to the young people assembled round the fire in the long winter evenings the history which gave the rock its singular name. One day there landed upon the coast a young woman who was completely un known. She was observed to wander upon the sandy shore, then to climb slowly and sadly the path to the solitary rock. She remained there for many long hours gazing, with a look of the most intense longing, far across the sea towards the distant horizon, whilst a shade of the most inexpressible disap pointment passed over her countenance. Day followed day, and still she always sought the summit of the rock, remain ing for hours gazing into the depths of the sea. At times, a deep sigh escaped her, and the tears flowed unrestrained from her eyes. The poor fisher folk wished to discover the cause of her un happiness, that they might offer her some consolation. Their hearts over flowed with sympathy and pity for th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1897

The Indian Advocate Devoted to the Interests of Indian Missions. Vol. IX. APRIL, 1897. No. 2. SAINT JOSEPH. mlH A beautiful custom now practiced by many of the faithful consists in dedicating each month of the year to some special devotion twelve spiritual bou quets as it were to be X offered to the throne ' of grace. Thus, May lis the month of Mary, June of the Sacred Heart, October of the ijjj Rosary, November of the Holy bouls, and the month of March we sanctify in a spe cial manner by honor ing St. Joseph. ?Sr Of all the sanctities in the Church, St. Joseph's is most concealed from view. The faint glim mer of light that comes to us through the chinks in the Gospel indicate a most divine and at the same time a most hidden life. Standing on the thres hold of the new dispensation, scarcely seeming to be a part of it, he is more like the link binding the holy Patri archs of the old to the saints of the new law. The last of the Patriarchs, he is the noblest certainly of them all. Abr...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1897

34 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. side lest the blasts smite its beauteous petals too roughly. He shielded her, guarded her, and when in the inscruta ble wisdom of God a cruel suspicion, the darkest and most bitter that could possibly torture his most just soul, was permitted to gnaw at his very entrails and bow him low in most abject grief and misery, there was the valiant man rising superior to the stern mandate of the law, a veritable tower of justice and strength, fitting counterpart to that "Tower of David," the "Valiant Woman." We love to consider the Holy Family as poor .aye, suffering even the pinch of poverty but we must understand that this was from choice. He who was repulsed and buffeted from door to door, as later his foster-child was sent in contumely from Pilate to Herod, and back again, could, if he so wished, have provided a decent shelter for the Lily of Israel in Bethlehem as well as he had hitherto cared for her in the little village of Nazareth. And is it not reasonable t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1897

PfMWfPWW'1-1 ' IHWjjpiWHP1."'1" Ti"W'"W THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 35 ognizo as the shadow of tho Heavenly Father. May we not bo persuaded that, although an occasional sigh for the green hills and fertile valleys of his own Judea may escapo him, Joseph's life in Egypt was not unlike his life in the little workshop at Nazareth, whither he will soon return, to its dear familiar scenes and pleasant tasks, its genial, warm-hearted neighbors, and his loving kinfolk. Yes, they will soon return, and even now we may see them as they pass through the gate of Heliopolis. A brighter joy lights up their features as they pass the Red Sea and move on ward over that dreary waste of sand and stone and stubble. Little heed they now the awful heat, the burning thirst, and all the many sufferings of their long and arduous journey. Joseph's step becomes more elastic as they draw nearer; the more froquenf travelers of their own nation whom they chance to meet; the more familiar objects, all tell them they are...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1897

3G THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. work is done, and he looks for that sum mons which he knows will soon come. It is hard to part from those we love, but what will we say of Joseph's part ing with Jesus and Mary? Oh, where among creatures was there ever love like unto that love, purer, stronger than the loves of all angels and men, that most pure semblance of the uncreated love which united Jesus and Mary and Joseph? By those who deepest love, whose love is purest, is keenest felt the parting pang. But Jesus, as if to spare him, would remove Joseph from the stirring, troublous scenes of Calvary, and Jo seph, whose will was ever to do the will of Him whose everlasting paternity over Jesus he for a brief period assumed, yields to the last sad tender embrace of his Virgin Spouse and the loving ca resses of Jesus. His head is pillowed on Mary's bosom. With gentle loving care she brushes back and smoothes the stray white lock from the forehead, and in its place imprints a kiss. A smile lights up th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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