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Title: Cayton's Weekly Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 713 items from Cayton's Weekly, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 16 August 1919

J@a^Zch& idzejeAfa PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington. U. S. A. Subscription $2 per year in advance. HORACE ROSCOE CATTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TELEPHONE: BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Are. South THE PASSING THRONG Was a Mighty Money Maker. Andrew Carnegie is dead and thus passeth to the great beyond another mortal who achieved world-wide fame in getting the money. He was simply a genius at making money and once he got it coming his way he could not consistently give it out as fast as it came to him. Some years ago he went on record as declaring, "I mean to die poor," but if he meant to say, "I will suc ceed in giving all of the money I now have away before I die," we fear he flat-footedly failed. However, after he retired from ac tive business he and a bevy of assistants spent their entire time finding deserving- in...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 16 August 1919

Ii appears then that the riots were only among the blacks, for no whites seem to have been indicted. We had supposed that the whites started the riots and finished them: but here, as so often, the newspapers have misled us. There was a report of a black beinpr stoned at a bathing beach, but evidently the wires got crossed and it should have read "white." Of course the grand jury being partly made up of blacks, the black men and women indicted received lair treatment and will have no complaint. We expect to have it brought ont that the rioting was confined to the "black colony" on the South Side, that the fi^htinp: was between the blacks and that whites only came in to preserve law and order. There were reports of blacks bein*? at tacked by whites, in the Loop and on the North Side —but doubtless they were false. Great is white-robed Justice with her evenly balanced scales! The black man will tret his just deserts—even more. The white man is generous and holds no <?rud£e: he is ev...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 16 August 1919

EDITORIAL PARAGRAPHS That anti-Japanese meeting held in Seattle must have struck a Puget Sound fog, which chilled its enthusiasm. That government bacon was high at 34c and we have our suspicion that it was an other case of "rotten beef" for the soldiers. No, President Wilson's name is not exactly a hiss and a by-word, but it is like unto salt that has lost its savor. Death puts the rich and the poor one alike on the same level. Carnegie dead is no more than Sam Henry in a like state. If Uncle Sam puts millions of suits on the market at cost he is liable to insult the Trust Hogs and that would just be horrible. If a policeman is not permitted to steal and graft nor to lean against a lamp post and finally to abuse a 'nigger," then, pray, what's the fun in neiiis a cop. Polities in this state has begun to warm np in spite of the fact that the King County Colored Republican club is taking its sum mer vacation. Billingsley's wire to Sheriff Stringer seems to confirm the intimation of Cay...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 16 August 1919

say. will not find tin 1 Negroes cowed as were the freedmen of ISfi.VTO; they will find men ready to die for their liberties. "This is the counsel of madness/ says the Nation: "it leads nowhere but to bloodshed without result." Yet the editorial in which the Nation makes this comment is entitled "The Neuro at Ray." The same editorial intimates that Bolshevism already has its Neizro spokesmen, and prophesies that "ex tremists, anarchists, preachers of sabotage and violence of every type will find many recruits if the Negroes' just grievances are not immediately put in process of removal." A little more of such presentation of the race situation, exclaims William Marion Reedy in the St. Louis Mirror, may precipi tate what everyone would avert; but that, he goes on to say, is only one side of it. The other side is that it is folly to dodge facts, to hide truth. Mi-. Reedy comments further: "The problem can only be solved by fac ing it understandingly. It is not insoluble, either. 11 ca...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 23 August 1919

J@a^/cfs& Jzeed^( PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle. Washington. U. S. A. Subscription $2 per year in advance. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, "Vash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TELEPHONE: BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Aye. South SOUTHERN PROPAGANDA Recently the following open letter was issued by James Weldon Johnson bearing upon the race riots in Washington City and Chicago, which is so full of meat for thought that the same is herewith repro duced : There has been for ;i number of years <i well-directed propaganda, issuing prin cipally from the South, which has had as its purpose placing the brand of rapist on the Negro race. This propaganda has been partly successful in establishing in the public mind the idea that there is the direct relation of cause and effect between rape and mob violence against the Xegro. Whenever the Xegro protests agai...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 23 August 1919

J@€l^CM&^z£j&6fa PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle. Washington. U. S. A. Subscription $2 per year in advance. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter. August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, 'Vash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TELEPHONE: BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Aye. South SOUTHERN PROPAGANDA Recently the following open letter was issued by James Weldon Johnson bearing upon the race riots in Washington City and Chicago, which is so full of meat for thought that the same is herewith repro duced : There has been for a number of years <i well-directed propaganda, issuing prin cipally from tile South, which has had as its purpose placing the brand of rapist on the Negro race. This propaganda has been partly successful in establishing in the public mind the idea that there is the direct relation of cause and effect between rape and mob violence againsi the Negro. Whenever the Negro protests a...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 23 August 1919

Hi* 1 black or yellow man monopolizing a particular part of the earth and preventing; the white man From making a living. Some day we shall learn that the earth is big enough, and that if we will hut remove the harriers there are plenty of jobs for all men regardless, of creed or color. Funda mentally, the black man's problem is the white man's problem. Until the bounties of nature, are open to both' without pay ment of toll to any exploiter, white or black", men will be artificially conscripted into opposing camps. •■ Is there nothing tn be done until tin's millennial day of industrial and economic freedom .' Yes. miicli. .Men who work in powder mills must learn not to scratch matches. Racial animosities can never be extinguished until the cause is removed. Bill we can prevent these critical outbreaks wliivh mar our national record. A more serious riol than either of these two would have occurred in Birmingham three or four months ago had it not been for resolute co operation betwe...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 23 August 1919

SOLVING THE RACE PROBLEM ■'You tell that French woman-spoiled brother of yours that the white men of Claiborne County will burn him at the stake if he dares to speak to a white woman here abouts unless she first calls him, ami even then, he had better keep his hat in his hands as long as she is talking to him/ said Law yer Martin of Shady Grove, Mississippi, to a beautiful octaroon young woman with whom he frequently spent an evening and from which liason one tiny tot already slept in its little bed and another one fast on its way to a world of woe. While George Washington Davis, late of oversea service, had shown no si^ns of un due familiarity with any of the white wo men thereabouts, yet when Miss May, dauhter of Cap'gn Big (inn. saw him with his uniform on and bearing the insignia of a first lieutenant and the French Croix de Guerre pinned on his In-east, she felt proud of him and condescended to say. Howdy George! I'm mouty glad to see you." to which greeting Lieutenant Davis ga...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 23 August 1919

Marl in kissed his hand ;is Nancy looked mil of the window at him. who happened to diivc by the depot thai mornin'. " The moli w.-is sadly disappointed but had little to say tlhoul having lost its vic tiui. iind L;iwyer Martin was not so out spoken on the subject ;is before. lie worked oti ;is of yore, but owing to poor health took no new cases. He finally left to regain his health, but would return in time For the Fall court. ll w;is ;it Tarrytown that ;i family re union was held ;md Mrs. Xancy •lane Mar tin, li'eiiteii;int (Jeorjre Washington Davis. both with a strain of Xeuro blood in their veins, received with open arms Cap'n Big (inn. Mistah !>ob Imy father) and Miss .May (my sister i and another chapter was written in the solution of the Tinted States' impending Race Problem in that second re union. 11. R. Cayton. TIME TELLS THE TALE Time fully explains many things that are more, or less complicated when they actually happen. When I whs about twenty-two yearn old. in order ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 30 August 1919

J&uf£cfs&iMije^fa PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington. U. S. A. Subscription $2 per year in advance. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TELEPHONE: BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Aye. South THE PASSING THRONG Uncle Sam is in need of 100,000 men for the Navy and yet when colored men apply for enlistment the clerks in the of fice stand and look at each other as though a gorilla or an ourangatang had sought enlistment. Tt is a long lane that has no turn anud some of these days, unless we miss our guess, Uncle Sam will seek colored men for enlistment and they will say. 'I know yon not." The very corner stone of this great government seems to be made up of color prejudice, especially against the Xegro, and yet he has never been called upon to defend that corner stone, but he wlilingly answered. "Here am T. send m...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 30 August 1919

WHAT NEGROES THINK OF THE RACE RIOTS By Ueorge E. llaynes. Director of Negro Economics, I". S. Depart- ment of Labor. One of the prime factors in the recent Washington and Chicago riots as well as in previous riots is the growing attitude of Negroes toward them. The writer of this article lias not attempted here to assess blame or responsibility, but to hold up the mirror so that the white world may get a clear and true reflection of the trend of public opinion among Negroes. This is not an effort to sift the facts connected with the Washington and Chicago riots or to specify causes. It is a report on what Negroes thought about them. The senti ments they hold are a factor in such situa- ions. The trend of their opinion may be con cretely indicated in the statements made by Xegroes of different nlaflses. A most reli able Negro in Washington, a man of the rank and file of workers, said: "During the riot I went home when through with my work and stayed there, but T prepared to protect ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 30 August 1919

SHE WOULDN'T BE WHITE ■'I don't give a tinker's damn if Nora has nigger blood in her, she is my grand daughter, and I am going to lend her north to a first class school and when she has finished her education, then I am «roin«i' to make a white woman of her," said Major Spitfire of St. Elmo, Mississippi, who was of more or less local fame, as he discussed the future of Nora Needles, a young colored irirl of rare beauty, of unusual intelligence and of much vivacity, with the colored school ma'am who was looking after the educational developments of the colored children on this thousand-acre plantation. While Miss Nora was classed as "colored," yet she had little the appearance of actually being- such, unless colored, as applied to her, meant an Indian, a Latin or some of the darker races of the old world. The school ma'am herself was from the North, but had fjone South to teach and w ras for tunate in jjettinu- a location like this. The school eorriculum was a rather limited one, but...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 30 August 1919

The yolinp colonel looked out of the window For <i Miiniiit 1 and then quickly re plied. "Colonel lioh Sliort was my grand- Father. He had another son, who went by the name of Sam Short, and he was my Father." "And was Nora your mother,*' the colored caller gasped. "She w;is." the colonel replied. "Mighty God! I came very near being your Father," the colored culled muttered. "I have heard mother say ;is much. Y^our picture is still in the family alhum. I ;iui truly glad to have mcl you. To accomplish my ambitions, I am now a white man. Tomorrow, according to orders .just received I will start for France. Yes. 1 have four brothers, all oi' whom are officers in white companies and I have two sisters white cross nurses. Rely on us doing our duty when colored troops are being abused by prejudiced white officers," and lie shook hands with the colored caller, let's hope for ever, as it will serve no good pur pose to mei'l auain. .M'ss Nora would not be ;i white woman, as was the desire...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 13 September 1919

V- v I i>i I' i A t t, A o • j . PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. Subscription $2 per year in advance. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TELEPHONE: BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Aye. South THE PASSING THRONG BRANDED SENATORIAL ASSES It is doubtless the first instance in the history of the United States, when a presi dent thereof felt justified in publicly pro nouncing IT. S. Senators ignorant asses, because forsooth, the senators opposed measures he advocated. If any class of the citizenry of this country is posted on the public policies hereof it must be the United States senators, and if they are not, then they hinder instead of help the onward march, the great rank and file of our citi zenry, think they are making. In view of the above facts it seems almost preposter ous that President Woodrow ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 13 September 1919

even shake his hand when in their hearts they say to hell with his policies. President Wilson will receive a warm welcome in Se attle because he is president and by no means because he put over the Shantung outrage and the loss he has to say about it when here Iho more generous will be his reception. BUT KEEP YOUR POWDER DRY However lamentable the race riots of this country may bo, they are demonstrating the fact that the colored man is no longer folding his arms and depending upon "the salva tion of the Lord to save him from the mobs", but lias come to the conclusion that his alternative is to fight back even though death be his portion. He long ago found out that it's death for him, if he does not fight back, and now he knows it's death if he does fight back, but in fighting back he dies with the satisfaction of know ing he is not going to cross the dark river all by his lonely. The mob did not lynch Ihe colored man it made arrangements to lynch at Knoxville, Tennessee last Saturd...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 13 September 1919

even shako his hand when in their hearts they say to hell with his policies. President Wilson will receive a warm welcome in Se al lie because he is president and by no means because he put over the Shantung outrage and the loss he has to say about it when here the more generous will be his reception. BUT KEEP YOUR POWDER DRY Elowever lamentable the race riots of this country may bo, they are demonstrating the fact that the colored man is no longer folding liis arms and depending upon "the salva tion of the Lord to save him from the mobs", but lias come to the conclusion that his alternative is to fight back even though death be his portion. He long ago found out that it's death for him, if he docs noi tight back, and now he knows it's death if he does fight back, but in fighting back he dies with the satisfaction of know ing he is not going to cross the dark river all by his lonely. The mob did not lynch the colored man it made arrangements to lynch at Knoxville, Tennessee last Sat...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 13 September 1919

NOT OF POCAHONTAS BLOOD "Not only unfaithful to your marriage vows have you been, but that infidelity was in the form of consorting with a niggah, thus adding insult to injury," almost piti ably did Gerald Mightyrich upbraid his young wife, who stood before him holding in her arms her first born, so swarthy in complexion as to almost make her doubt herself. While a great tear stole down her cheek she suddenly pulled herself together and in an almost defiant tone exclaimed, " Absolutely innocent." Then again she softened and as her great wistful, lov ing eyes met his steady gaze she finally said, "Trust me, Gerald, trust me. I am innocent." For a minute his mind waiver ed but being of high southern blood the thoughts of a niggah baby in his house soon overcame any compassion that might have momentarily lurked about his heart, and without a word of reply he abruptly turn ed from her. And then a great gloom like the blue imps of night seemed to envelop the two of them, and in her despe...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 13 September 1919

NOT OF POCAHONTAS BLOOD "Not only unfaithful to your marriage vows have you been, but that infidelity was in the form of consorting with a niggah, thus adding insult to injury," almost piti ably did Gerald Mightyrich upbraid his young wife, who Stood before him holding in her arms her first born, so swarthy in complexion as to almost make her doubt herself. While a great tear stole down her cheek she suddenly pulled herself together and in an almost defiant tone exclaimed, "Absolutely innocent." Then again she softened and as her great wistful, lov ing eyes met his steady gaze she finally said, "Trust me, Gerald, trust me. I am innocent." For a minute his mind waiver ed but being of high southern blood the thoughts of a niggah baby in his house soon overcame any compassion that might have momentarily lurked about his heart, and without a word of reply he abruptly turn ed from her. And then a great gloom like the blue imps of night seemed to envelop the two of them, and in her desper...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 13 September 1919

STOLEN FROM THIEVES Hotel Proprietor — "l trust that we shall make you feel quite ?it home." Henry Peek — "Please don't try it, sir, I .nil away for ;i good time." As woman loves by (it and start, She'll smile and then she'll weep it; Don'l think because you've Avon her heart, .My boy, that you can't keep it. lie "I cnii never forgive you. Last niphi you said I w;is b lobster." she "Bui yoo know, darling, that I just dearly love lobsters." With ;i irhul cry he folded her to his breast. Thinwun—"There have been some swell doings in that house across the way lately." F.itiin "is that so.' What kind?" Thinwiin ■■-" All nine of the kids over there have hnd the mumps." Carney—"] have just been reading the Constitution of the United States." Barney^ ell?" Carney—"l was awfully surprised to find out how many rights a fellow really had." .Mrs. Savit—"Annie. I think we will have some chicken croquettes today. Make them out of the leftover pork we had for supper last night." Annie—"Yes'm. An'...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 20 September 1919

J&ufZch&Jzee&g PRICE FIVE CENTS OAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington. U. S. A. Subscription $2 per year in advance. HORACE ROSCOE CATTON. .Editor and Publisher Entred as second class matter, August 18, 1916, at the post office at Seattle, Wash., under the Act of March 3rd, 1916. TETEPH9NE: BEACON 1910 Office 303 22nd Aye. Sonth EDITORIAL PARAGRAPHS Life is full and overflowing with human contradictions as may be seen in those whom you love best loving you less. "Who is a quitter" seemed to hit the bull's eye, when propounded, but "how I wish I had never asked the question." If President Wilson would but add an other hour to his daylight-saving he might save the day for his European peace pact. That Villia is a bad actor is plain to be seen, but as bad as he is the southern white man has him skinned forty ways for lection. Rubbing it in on the rent hog seems to have little or no effect on his conscience as he goes on collecting high rent just th...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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