ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: National Tribune, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 12,580 items from National Tribune, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
12,580 results
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 26 November 1881

THE NATIONAL TRIBUNE: WASHINGTON, D. C, NOVEMBER 26, 1881. o THE GREAT STATE TRIAL. Continued from First page.' to sneak with a policeman, and became separated TObpukiui. f foeether. from witness, though ui. m- ., On nntnri,,, the Indies' waiting-room, there was On entcrini lir Indies' wailing-iumn, uiciu ius suddenly and witnout 1h"'"-"." '-'J " report of a pistol, followed almost immediately by another report. Thinking that there was shooting among persons not of their party, wit ness rushed forward to hurry the President away, in order to escape any stray luillet. Laid his hand imon the President's shoulder, and as he did so the latter threw up his hands, and ex claimed : " My God, what is this? " Witness thought this cry was uttered a brief time after the first shot was fired. About the same time a man coming from behind rushed past witness, and almost immediately thereafter there was a shout: ''We have got him!" The President sank slowly to the floor and began ", .. i -. -"? -l...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 26 November 1881

6 THE NATIONAL TRIBUNE: WASHINGTON, D. C NOVEMBER 2(5, 1881. MARY. The box is nol of stainless alabaster Which o'er thy (vet 1 break; Kor tilled with coly ointment, gracious blaster, Poured for thy sake. Nay, rather is it .lmpen in this fashion A living heart, Dashed all across with scarlet stains of passion, And broke in part; "While from its open wound comes softly dripping, Like slow tears shed. On heavy drops, along thy footstool slipping. It life-blood red. It nerds no balm of myrrh for sweet or hitler, Bui life and love; The siid condition.-, make mine offering filler Thy heart to move. Prom all these claims of cruel -wrong and anguish, This load of grief "Wliervwith my mouI doth pant, and mourn, and languish, CJivc me relief 1 In thy far homo is not thy soul &till tender For mortal woe? HearVt thon not still amid that spotless splendor The seraphs, know? Oh, turn thy human eyes from heavenly glory 1 Say as before Those tendered words of all thy gospel story " Go, sin no m...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 26 November 1881

THE NATIONAL TRIBUNE: WASHINGTON, D. C, NOVEMBER 26, 1881. - ' THE AMERICAN PRODUCER. Give me the blue of the bcrnling sky O'er the land of the freeman hung, Ami the bright, fi.H ' of the sun on high, While the hymn of the free is Ming; Oh,neVrWlsthel:yo'eralamlhkeonrS jicnttlown with its arch of blue, Or jovmily wept in it crytl showers, Or gemmed the glad .rth with dew. Give me the land where the plough's bright share Turns wealth from the virgin soil, Kor melts in the forge where the vulcans bear A sword for the warrior's spoil : Kot the song of the soldier's bloody trade, ISbr the trumpet's startling twang, Uut the vow of pesiee on the altar laid, Hound the hearthstone fondly sang. Oh. bright is the land where the golden grain "Waves over the fertile fields, And the tall, ripe corn on the spreading plain Its harvest of bounties yields; "Where the sounding flail, as it swings in air Falls fast on the threshing floor, And the Autumn sun shows the toilers there "With the gold dust ...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 26 November 1881

8 THE NATIONAL THIBUNE: WASHINGTON, D. C, NOVEMBER 26, 1881. GENERAL MEIGS'S REPORT. The annual report of Quartermaster-General Meigs has been transmitted to the Secretary of "War. The report is a voluminous one, and shows in detail the operations of the Department dur ing the fiscal year ended June "0, 1881. It con tains a number of recommendations regarding the service of the Department, including a re newal of past recommendation for the erection of a building for the safe-keeping of records of the Executive Departments not in frequent use. In reviewing his recommendation for a Hall of Rec ords, General Meigs says: "There can be no doubt as to the value and economy of such a building. An appropriation therefor has passed the Senate unanimously, but in the last hours of the late Congress it failed in conference. General Meigs then refers to the proposed new building for the Pension Office, and says that owing to a verbal defect in the law providing for the erection of this buildin...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 3 December 1881

i "TO CARE FOR HIM WHO HAS BORNE THE BATTLE, AND F6R HIS WIDOW AND ORPHANS." ESTABLISHED 1877. WASHINGTON, D. C, SATURDAY, DECEMBEB 3, 1881. NEW SERIES VOL-1., N-16. ? 7 SKETCHES OF HOSPITAL LIFE HOW OUR BOYS WERE CARED FOR. Don't lie a Fool, John ! About Homesickness Don't Cut Off My Mustache Yisitini? Angels and Noble-Hearted Snnrcons. For The National TitinuN'E.- Mingled with the sufferings and sorrows which are necessary incidents of hospital life we find now and then gleams of humor and hits of ro mance which, breaking through the gloom that hangs like a dark cloud above the cots of the sick and wounded men, help them to the better bear the burden of their woes. And such occurrences, slight though they may be in the estimation of others who have no per sonal knowledge of what hospital life really is, and, more especially, of what it was during the war, possess an unusual interest to all who, from sad experience, understand what it is to be strand ed like a wreck upon the fearfu...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 3 December 1881

THE NATIONAL TBIBUNE: WASHINGTON, D. O., DECEMBER 3, 1881. LIFE, Life is so cheap ami yet eo dear, We prize it, but we scorn it too, And plod our round from year to year "With little or to hope or do : Sach day brings fretful cares and moil, And sorrows come, and joys deiwirt, And we grow old with weary toil, Or else from listlessness of heart "What matters which ? What matters how ? Time hecdeth not our fitful mood, But stamps its signet on our brow In city life or solitudes; And we grow old; yet scarcely feel The incessant whirling of the wheel, Nor heed the traces that declare We are not now what once we were : The world has worn us to its ways. " Do this," it says, and we obey ; There is no freedom in our praise And little courage left to pray. At moments with a sudden pain We grasp and cry for youth again, And wonder whence the joy has gone, Which we were wont to feed upon ; When Love with life walked hand in hand, When 'twas a boundless bliss to dare The mighty peaks that guar...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 3 December 1881

THE NATIONAL TRIBUTE: WASHTGTON", D. C, DECEMBER 3, 1881. 3 DRIVING HOME THE COWS Out of the clover and blue-eyed grass He turned them into the river-hme; One after another he let them pass, Then fastened the meadow bars again. Under the willows and over the hill He patiently followed their sober pace; The merry whistle for once was still, And something shadowed the sunny face. Only a boy ! and his father had said He never could let his youngest go ; Two already were lying dead Under the feet of the trampling foe. But after the evening's work was done, And th2 frogs were loud in the meadow-awamp, Over his shoulder he flung his gun And stealthily followed the footpath damp. Across the clover and through the wheat "With resolute heart and purpose grim, Though cold was the dew on his hurrying feet, And the blind bat's flitting startled him. Thrice since then had the lanes been white, And the orchards sweet with apple-bloom ; And now, when the cows came back at night, The feeble father ...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 3 December 1881

THE NATIONAL TBIBUNE: WASHINGTON, D. C, DECEMBER 3, 1881. 4 The National Tribune PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY. TO CARE FOR HIM WHO HAS BORNE THE BATTLE, AND FOR HIS tflDOW AND ORPHANS. ABRAHAM LINCOLN. Terms to Subscribers, Payable h Advance: (postage PREPAK)) ONE COPY, ONE YEAR $1.50 FIVE COPIES " 6.25 ONE COPY THREE MONTHS ----- 50 ONE COPY SIX MONTHS ----- 75 TEN COPIES, (with extra copy to getter-up bf club,) 12.50 A SPECIMEN NUMBER of our paper sent free on request. TERMS FOR ADVERTISING furnished upon application. jss-TO SUBSCRIBERS. When changing your ADDRESS PLEASE GIVE FORMER AS WELL AS PRESENT ADDRESS, WITH COUNTY AND STATE. 2TAKE NOTICE In sending money for sub scriptions BY MAIL, NEVER INCLOSE THE CURRENCY EXCEPT IN A REGISTERED LETTER. A POSTAL MONEY ORDER OR A DRAFT ON NEW YORK IS THE BEST FORM OF REMITTANCE. LOSSES BY MAIL WILL BE MOST SURELY AVOIDED IF THESE DIRECTIONS ARE FOL LOWED. j5s-no responsibility is assumed for subscrip tions paid to agents, which must be at the...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 3 December 1881

THE NATIONAL TBIBUNE: WASHINGTON, D. C, DECEMBER 3, 1881. 5 STILL IN JEOPARDY. Continued from First page.' "Never mind," said Mr. Davidge, "I will bring "That's right, judge," said Guiteau to Mr. Dav idge ; "you are doing well." Sir. Scoville having asked the witness whether he thought the defendant insane, Guiteau broke in, saying I object: he is not an expert." The court a few minutes after three o'clock adjourned till Friday. Mr. Scoville, on opening the proceedings on Friday, said that the prisoner wanted to make a brief statement. Guiteau " I will only occupy the attention of the Court about three minutes." The Court "Proceed, sir." Guiteau, then, unfolding a roll of manuscript, read the following statement. I propose to have all the facts bearing on this case go to the court and jury to this end. I have been forced to interrupt my counsel and witnes ses, who were mistaken as to the supposed facts. I meant no discourtesy to them or any one. Any fact in my career bearing on the ...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 3 December 1881

6 THE NATIONAL TKIBUNE: WASHING-TOST, X. C, DECEMBER 3, 1881. For The National Tribuxe. MOTHER-LOVE. Bonny brown ringlets and bright, laughing eyes (L:uigliing yet tender eyes, loving and true) Cheeks softly tinted like morning's fair .kies Just where the crimson blush melts into blue; Lips ripe for kissing," one small, dimpled hand Itestiug against them so earelers and free, Sweet little darling, what far fairy laud Lost thee when smiling love brought thec to mo? Dear little wanderer! O, that the years Ever might linger, nor pass on their way Sowing their cares to bo Avatered by tears, O, that forever might be as to-day ! Then might 1 fondle thee thus in my arms; Then might I care for thee, kiss thee, my pet, Feasting my eyes on thy sweet baby-charms Charms which my mother-love ne'er can forget. Yet, darling baby-boy, this may not be; Soon thou wilt vanish except from my heart, Graven thine image shall there picture thee Through the long coming years just as thou art. Soon will thy...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 3 December 1881

THE NATIONAL TEIBUNE: WASHINGTON, B. C, DECEMBER 3, 1881, THE OLD CHOIR. BY J. T.. 8WETT. 'Twas a glorious thing, in those good old days, As far back as memory goes, When all -who would sing the Omniscicnt's praise Could do so -whenever they chose; And each Sunday morning, at toll of the bell In the gallery, spacious and long, The opening hymn, with its solemn swell, Was sung by the musical throng: And the chorister's face Wore a marvellous grace, As he measured the time of the soug. 'Twos a quaint little church in our Tillage town, And it stood on the principal street, With the door from the walk only two steps down, Wide open the whole world to greet; And in through that door, every Sunday, there passed More singers than those who were not ; And they filled up the gallery, silent and fast, Until vacancy dwindled to jot: And then what a song Sang that musical throng, When the nod from their leader they got ! No organ e'er pealed forth its harmony grand On the ears of the worshipers...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 3 December 1881

8 THE NATIONAL TBIBIHSHE: WASHINGTON, D. O., DECEMBER 3, 1881. ."SOJERING." He was a clever printer man Upon n stool he sat, And calmly-watched the copy-hook And gobbled up the fat. The hook was awful lean that night, And with a purpose naughty 31c hemmed and hawed and slugged away, And sojered like all forty. lie heard the paragraphist say: "A poem have I writ The editor now scans it o'er, 'Twill be here in a bit! " The printer man joyed in his soul, His heart was happy, very lie hemmed and hawed and slugged away, And sojered all so merry. Alas, that poem all so fair Came not his string to c?.ivc It climbed the golden lxvfcet's rim And found an early aft ..ve. But still he sojered sojei cd on, Nor stay for this nor t h t, For who can turn the pi inter's so il "When sojering for fat ? The paper went to press, and still Upon his stool he sat And hemmed and hawed a id slug ,ed away A sojerin' for fat. Upon this very day he's th-re Perhaps you printers know 'im? He sojers morning, noon...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 10 December 1881

"TO CARE FOR HIM WHO HAS BORNE THE BATTLE, AND FOR HIS WIDOW AND ORPHANS." r & ESTABLISHED 1877. SOME FAMILIAR PLACES. IN AND ABOUT THE NATIONAL CAPITAL. The Old Capitol Prison Central Gnard-IIouse Camp ConTftleKccnt The Toting Hero Anotlier Incident of Hospital Life. For The National Tribune. "We shall never forget one little incident that occurred in Dr. DeWitt's -ward while we were one of its occupants. Upon a cot not far from ours lay a member of the Twentieth Massachusetts who had been wounded at Groveton, the hall passing through the shoulder just above the armpit, in its course fearfully lacerating one of the principal arteries. The location of the injured vessel was such that it could not be properly taken up, and in spite of all the appliances of surgical skill it was apparent to even a casual observer that the boy (he was only sixteen years of age) could not long survive. A short time after being brought to the hospital he was informed that he could not live, and then ...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 10 December 1881

2 THE NATIONAL TBIBUNE: WASHINGTON, D. C., DECEMBER 10, 1881. INCOMPLETE. There's a song that I never could sing, Though its notes in my memory ring, And its measures are full of the sweets of the years, Of voices of- children and laughter and tears And the whirr of the summer bird's wing. There's a picture I never could paint Sweet and fair as some aurcoled saint; Like a dawn on the ocean, where no eyes can see, In wild, fitful splendor it burnetii for me, And I mourn as its colors grow faint. There's a dream ah ! I never can tell "What my own bosom loveth so well ; Yet how sweetly it comes in the depths of the night; Like a message it comes, like a message of light From the land where the sun children dwell. For I gather the thought and the tone From the wreck of bright hours that arc flown, And I hold to my heart, in my foolish despair, A trifle a nothing much lighter than air Lifeless leaves of a love I have known. Edgar M. Bacon in Baldwin's Monthly. A LOOK IN THE STREAM. Seest...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 10 December 1881

THE NATIONAL TRIBUNE: WASHINGTON, Dv C.v DECEMBEB 10, 1881. a A DESERTER. BY MAKY A. BARK. "Deserter ! " Well, Captaih, the word's about right. And its uncommon queer I should run from n fight, Or the chance of a fight; I, raised in a land "Where boys, you may say, are born rifle in hand, And who've fought all my life for the right of my ranch, "With the wily Apache and the cruel Comanche. But it's true, and I'll own it, I did run away. " Drunk? " No, sir ! I'd not tasted a. drop all day ; Butr smile if you will I'd a dream in the night, And I woke in a fever of sorrow and fright And went for my horse ; 'twas up and away ; And I rode like the wind till the break of the day.' " "What was it I dreamt? " I dreamed of my wife The true little woman that's better than life 1 dreamt of my boys I have three one is ten, The youngest is four all brave little men Of my one baby girl, my pretty white dove, The star of my home, the rose of its love. I saw the log house on the clear San Antoine, ...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 10 December 1881

4 THE NATIONAL TEIBUNE: WASHINGTON, D. O., DECEMBER 10, 1881. The National Tribune PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY. TO CARE FOR H!M WHO HAS BORNE THE BATTIE, mOOVt AND ORPHANS." ABRAHAM ulNCOLN, AND FOR HIS Terms to Subscribers, Payable in Advance: (postage fsepaid) ONE COPY, ONE YEAR FIVE COPIES " $1.50 - 6.25 ONE COPY THREE MONTHS ----- 50 ONE COPY SIX MONTHS ----- 75 TEN COPIES, (with extra copy to cetter-up cf club,) 12.50 A SPECIMEN NUMBER of our paper sent free on request. TERMS FOR ADVERTISING furnished upon application. 4T0 SUBSCRIBERS. When changing your ADDRESS PLEASE GIVE FORMER AS WELL AS PRESENT ADDRESS, WITH COUNTY AND STATE. 3rTAKE NOTICE In sending money for sub scriptions BY MAIL, NEVER INCLOSE THE CURRENCY EXCEPT IN A REGISTERED LETTER. A POSTAL MONEY ORDER OR A DRAFT ON NEW YORK IS THE BEST FORM OF REMITTANCE. LOSSES BY MAIL WILL BE MOST SURELY AVOIDED IF THESE DIRECTIONS ARE FOL LOWED. -GS-NO RESPONSIBILITY IS ASSUMED FOR SUBSCRIP TIONS PAID TO AGENTS, WHICH MUST BE AT ...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 10 December 1881

THE NATIONAL TRIBUNE: WAiSfflNGTON, D. C, DECEMBER 10, 1881. THE PRESIDENT MESSAGE. To the Senate and House of BeprcsenMives ojthe United States : An appalling calamity has befallen the Ameri can people since their chosen representatives last jaet in the halls where you are now assembled. We might else recall with unalloyed content the rare prosperity with which throughout the year the Nation has been blessed. Its harvests have been plenteous ; its varied industries have thriven; the health of its people has been preserved ; it has maintained with foreign governments the undis turbed relations of amity and peace. For these manifestations of His favor, we owe to Him who -holds our destiny in His hands the tribute of our grateful devotion. To that mysterious exercise of His will, which has taken from us the loved and illustrious citi zen who was but lately the head of the Nation, we bow in sorrow and submission. The memory of his exalted character, of his noble achievements, and of hi...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 10 December 1881

THE NATIONAL TBIBTJNE: WASHINGTON, D.Q., DECEMBER : 10, 1881; 6: AN "OLD BOY'S" ADVICE. BY KBEN E. KKXFOKD. My boy, you're soon to be a man; Get ready for a man's work now, And learn to do tbe best you can, When sweat is brought to arm and brow. Don't be afraid, my boy, to work ; 'You've got to, if you mean to win ! He is a coward who will shirk ; Roll up your sleeves, and then ugo in ! " Don't wait for chances ; look about ! There's always something you can do. He who will manfully strike out, Finds labor; plenty of it, too. But he who folds his hands and waits For 'something to turn up," will find The toiler passes Fortune's gates, While he, alas, is left behind ! Be honest as the day is long; Don't grind the poor man for his cent. In helping others, you grow strong, And kind deeds done are wisely lent. And this remember : if you're wise, To your oivn business be confined. He is a fool, and fails, who tries His fellow-men's affairs to mind. Don't be discouraged and get blue If thi...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 10 December 1881

THE NATIONAL TRIBUNE: WASHINGTON, B. C.y DECEMBER 10, 1881. 7 THE FARMER. -When the trees arcreathcd with blossoms, And the raptured, feathered throng Greet the sweet spring's welcomed coming Willi their adulating song; In his field apace the farmer ctrikes the furrows wide and deep, From his hand the golden kernels Casting forth with generous sweep. When the sultry sun of summer Shimmers down on all the land, Through the days it toils unceasing With its soft and plastic hand ; Toils with him to make the harvest, Bringing fleecy clouds of rain ; And the fertile vapor rising In the dew returns again. With the sunshine he has labored Till the autumn comes amain ; And he reaps the ripened harvest Bending on the golden plain; Autumn with her lap overflowing With her gifts of all the year, And her song is sweet and tender In her promise of good cheer. When the winter rules the country, AVraps the fields in icy sleep, In the barns the stock is feeding Horse and kine and fleecy sheep Snug ...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The national tribune. — 10 December 1881

THE NATIONAL TRIBUNE: WASHINGTON, D. C., DECEMBER 10, 1881. INSULTING THE SOLDIERS. Tor sixteen years "the soldier element" has had everything pretty much its own way. Gen erals and Colonels, by virtue of those titles, (won in many cases hy political influence and by no merits of their own,) have had the inside track in all the nominating conventions. They have received the best offices in the gift of the people. If the preponderance of the "soldier ele ment" elevated and purified the public service it would be welcome. No taxpayer, no man free from .party shackles, would object to the presence tf any element that would work such a charm. But the public service has been at no time more cor rupt than since military candidates have been in the ascendant. New York Journal of Commerce. OUR CRUISERS AS THEY ARE. Attached to the report of the Naval Advisory Board, are valuable memoranda on the present condition, cost of repairs, and lifetime after repair, of the cruisers now in service. F...

Publication Title: National Tribune, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: District of Columbia, United States
x
Loading...
x
x