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Elephind.com contains 25,612 items from St Arnaud Mercury, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Family Notices [Newspaper Article] — St Arnaud Mercury — 7 January 1914

DEATH, PERRY.-At St. Arnaud, on the 5th January, William, beloved husband of Alice Perry. Aged 68 years. The funeral will leave deceased's late residence, Silvermines Road, THIS DAY (Wednesday) at 4 p m. for the St. Arnaud Cemetery. W. L. KELL, (Established 1860) ('Phone 43) Undertaker, IN MEMORIAM. HARVEY,-In loving memory of John Henry Harvey, who was accidentally drowned at   St. Arnaud on 3rd January, 1009, In the bloom of his life death claimed him, In the pride of his manhood days; None knew him but to love him, None mentioned his name but in praise, --Inserted by his loving mother and sisters.

Publication Title: St Arnaud Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
OBITUARY. MR. WILLIAM PERRY. [Newspaper Article] — St Arnaud Mercury — 7 January 1914

OBITUARY, MR. WILLIAM PERRY, Another of the earlier residents of St, Arnaud has gone to his rest in the person of Mr. William Perry, who succumbed on Monday morning after a long and painful illness from miner's complaint. Deceased was born at Stanton, Wiltshire, England, in 1846. He come to Australia when a child three years old with his parents, who landed at Adelaide. A couple of years afterwards they removed to Victoria. When a man of about 27 years of age, deceased settled in St. Arnaud, and he married a year or so later. He followed the occupation of a miner, and was employed in the Lord Nelson for many years. He went away to Western Australia, where he resided for a considerable time, and he returned to St. Arnaud some twelve months ago. A widow and family are left, the latter being -Mr. G. Perry, W A, Mr. W. Perry, Ouyen ; Mrs. M'Kenna, St. Arnaud ; Mrs, J. Young, St. Arnaud; Mrs, Puonceby, St. Arnaud; Mrs. Chandler, St, Arnaud; and Mrs. M'Gregor, W,A The funeral is an- nounc...

Publication Title: St Arnaud Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A SPIDER SAVES A KING'S LIFE. [Newspaper Article] — St Arnaud Mercury — 7 January 1914

A SPIDER SAVES A KING'S LIFE, Strong men are proverbial in hav- ing many enemies, and that strongest, most masterful of monarchs, Freder- ick the Great, was no exception to the rule.     On one occasion he was saved from death in a most extraordinary man- ner. It was at the time when he was a veritable firebrand in Europe, with the French, Austrians, and Elizabeth of Russia leagued against him. In his palace at Sans Souci, the present Potsdam, he had dined one evening, and a cup of chocolate, his usual drink, was brought him. The king was about to drink when a spider, lowering itself from the ceiling, flop- ped right into the cup. The king, somewhat annoyed, placed the cup on the floor and called for another. His deerhound, lying at his feet, see- ing the cup, made for it and drank. Within a few minutes the animal stag- gered and fell in a fit, dying almost before the fresh chocolate had been brought. The drink had been poison- ed by a treacherous servant, ...

Publication Title: St Arnaud Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ABOUT THE SUGAR-CANE. [Newspaper Article] — St Arnaud Mercury — 7 January 1914

ABOUT THE SUGAR-CANE. The early history of the sugar-cane is shrouded in obscurity. It appears to have been well known to the an cients. Herodotus knew of it, and Theophrastus alluded to it as the "sugar-reed" of Egypt, although it is quite possible that this might have been one of the sorghum family. In the seventh century, Paulus Aegenitus speaks of sugar as "Indian salt," and from the evident Sanskrit origin of the word sugar, there is little doubt that the Far East must have been its place of origin. The Crusaders came across it in Syria, and one of them, de Vitriaco, described the process of manufacture by squeezing and boiling down the juice. The sugar-cane was brought into Spain by the Moors, and to the Spaniards is duo the introduc. tion of its manufacture into Ilispan iolaor Cuba, where in 1578 there wore as many as twenty-eight sugar-works in operation, Thence it was intro- duced into the other West Indian Islands.

Publication Title: St Arnaud Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HEALTH IN WALKING. [Newspaper Article] — St Arnaud Mercury — 7 January 1914

HEALTH IN WALKING. "No exercise," says a physician, "equals walking as a health-giver and a life-saver. I don't suppose that out of ten thousand persons a hundred can walk twenty miles a day. And yet every adult ought to be able to do so. Pedestrianism renews every part of the body. Try it, not as a necessity, but as an exercise. Get out every morning and walk. Your feet should be shod with care. Wear good walking- shoes. Be sure and have room in the shoes for each toe to perform its func- tions, and see that the shoes do not slip at the heel. Wear thick woollen stockings, and so that they do not crease or bind. For a person unac- customed to exercise, let the first walk be three or four miles, leisurely taken. Add a half-mile every other day. Keep it up for three weeks, and you will be able to walk twenty miles a day easily     and without fatigue. You will see the difference in the muscles of your limbs, will feel stronger In every part of your body, and ...

Publication Title: St Arnaud Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
He Earned It. [Newspaper Article] — St Arnaud Mercury — 7 January 1914

He Earned It. Mr. Huckins was trying to put up a new door for the Widow Jennings. The day was hot and muggy, and she wor- ried him all day with questions, sug- gestions, and complaints. "Aren't you getting that too nar- row?" asked the widow. "No, ma'am," said Mr. Huckins; "you know a few minutes ago you thought it was too wide." "Oh, yes," said Mrs. Jennings. "Well, anyway, I believe it'll sag if you don't change the hinge." Mr. Huckins held the door in place, and proved that the hinges were in the right spot. But she soon broke out again, and so matters went on. When at last it was hung and Mr. Huckins was ready to depart, the widow asked him for his bill. "I don't make out any bills," said Mr. Huckins wearily; "but I'll tell ye what this work'll cost. If I'd done it under the ordinary circumstances I have to contend with, 'twould have been ten shillings, but in this case I'll have to charge yo an extry sixpence, ma'am, for pester."

Publication Title: St Arnaud Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Canada versus United States. [Newspaper Article] — St Arnaud Mercury — 7 January 1914

Canada versus United States. Sir Wilfred Laurier possesses a par. ticular aptitude for administering crushing retorts to ill-mannered peo ple. At one of Lady Minto's big recep- tions some time ago he was tremen- dously bored by a young American, who was criticising our Colonies in general and Canada in particular. Every institution (says a biographer) was compared in turn, to their great disadvantage, with those of the States. "Can't think why you don't choose some animal, some good-sized boast or bird, for your national emblem, in. stead of a maple leaf," he remarked. "S'pose you're waiting till we annex you!" "We have the beaver," Sir Wilfred reminded him, "the emblem of indus- try." "Beaver, indeed! Do you know what we call the beaver? A rat with a swelled tail," chuckled the Ameri- can. "And many people are apt to look on your American eagle as a jay with a swelled head," the Premier promptly replied. The late Lord Kelvin, accompanied by Doctor Joule, paid a visit to the es- tab...

Publication Title: St Arnaud Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A SER[?] A Tale of a Shirt. [Newspaper Article] — St Arnaud Mercury — 7 January 1914

A Tale of a Shirt. There is a Japanese in an American town who had the news painfully im- pressed upon him the other day that it is against the law to hit a man who is wearing glasses; and he did not learn it through committing the offence. The trouble that led to the addition to his education started in a Japanese laundry. A customer went in after his clothing, and found that a treasured striped shirt was missing. Immedi- ately he entered a protest. The three Japanese proprietors were lacking in knowledge of English--they knew how to wash a shirt, but not how to pro- nounce it. So they couldn't under- stand what the "honorable white gen- tleman" was roaring about. And he, thinking that their ignorance was only pretended, macking a plan to steal that precious striped shirt departed, to return soon with reinforcements.   The battle of language was renewed, he again demanding his striped shirt, and the laundrymen still being unable to understand him. At this juncture an e...

Publication Title: St Arnaud Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE DISCOVERY OF TROUSERS. A Hint from the Elephant. [Newspaper Article] — St Arnaud Mercury — 7 January 1914

THE DISCOVERY OF TROUSERS. A Hint from the Elephant. To Alexander the Great, it is said, is due the discovery of trousers. It seems that the Conqueror had retired for a while, during his campaign in India, from his suite, and was ponder- ing in an open space of the jungle on the great riddle of life and the lit- tleness of man, when he was aware of the contiguity of an elephant, wild         but friendly, with what he conceived to be its back towards him. As he looked like was struck by the negligence and ease with which this vast animal wears the skin on its legs, at once a loose and well-fitting, so serviceable and unpretentious. Feeling at the same moment a chilliness about his own knees, Alexander at once sig- nalled for the court tailor and bade him make him a garment on similiar lines. Alexander the Great Improver the original idea, in the press of bat- tle, and his best trousers were care fully creased.

Publication Title: St Arnaud Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Something to Weep For. [Newspaper Article] — St Arnaud Mercury — 7 January 1914

Something to Weep For. Harry Lauder, the great Scottial comedian and golfer, told a very good story at a dinner in New York during his recent visit there. He was speaking about a great golf professional. "But he is ugly," Mr Lauder said. "Dear me, he is ugly! He is as ugly as that sultan who had all the mirrors removed from his pal- ace so that he might avoid the pain of seeing his own face. This sultan called on his grand vizier one day, and by accident happened to catch sight of his reflection. His hideousness over powered him, and he broke into violent sobbing. In this outburst the vizier joined. Finally the sultan calmed down, wiped his eyes, got ready to smoke and talk. But not so the vizier. He sobbed on and on. His master, tap- ping his slipper impatiently on the cushions, waited for him to cease. At length the sultan got angry, and ex- claimed, 'Why do you weep longer than I, vizier?' 'Alas!' the grand vizier replied, 'you wept, O commander of the faithful, because you saw y...

Publication Title: St Arnaud Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE KHEDIVE AND THE AMERICAN SALESMAN. [Newspaper Article] — St Arnaud Mercury — 10 January 1914

THE KHEDIVE AND THE AMERICAN SALESMAN. An amusing reminiscence of the present Khedive of Egypt Is told by Mr. 14, Alexander Powell, late consular. rcpresentativo of the United States at Alexandria, in his book, "The Last 'rontier," Mr. Powell says he re ceived a caill from the chairmini of an American firm whose special line of business was the manufacture of agricultural and well-drilling machin ery, Mr. Powell's. visitor explained that as lie was passing through Egypt lie thought it might be possible to ob tain an audience with the Khedlve: Agriculture and Its attendant prob* lems of Irrigation and fertilslation constitute tne solo hobby and amuse* ment of the present Khedive, Abbas I-tilmi, H-e is consequently a ready and liberal purchaser of all improved types of agricultural machinery, which he puts to practical use on .his great estates. 'The request of my compatriot was duly transmitted to the grand master of ceremonies, and shortly thereafter a reply reached me that named th...

Publication Title: St Arnaud Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE ANTIQUITY OF HAIRPINS. [Newspaper Article] — St Arnaud Mercury — 10 January 1914

TME ANTIQUITY OF H1AIRPINS, -Hairpinus have been elaborated as a means of decoration since the earliest times, Particularly beautiful is the uelicacy of their workmanship, two of the finest specimens boinug the gold pina which were found at Salamls in Cyprus, and are now in the Brltish Museum. 1 ven more handsome were the Saxon pills of a later date, with their shank of brass, head of gold, and enbellishmellt of garnets and pearls, There were, too, the larger sort of pnlus so conspicuously and fre quently mentioned in the Bible, The instrument driven by Jacl through the temple of Sisera was probably a tent. pill, while Delilah fastened the web on Samon's hair with a pin or batten, lit the Middle Ages plus were a great fashion-indeed a necessity in France, and we have it on record that in 1347 twelve thousand pins were removed from the royal wardrobe for one of the French princesses. The convenience was probably a little later in reaching England, but in 1540 we hear of Queen Catheri...

Publication Title: St Arnaud Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Avoiding Eye-Strain. [Newspaper Article] — St Arnaud Mercury — 10 January 1914

Avoiding Eye-Strain. Eye*train is said to be largely a defect of civilisation. To counteract it, childron should be encouraged to use their eyes at long range, A teacher who has a surprisingly small amount of eye-strain among her pupils attri Lutes it to her practico of making the scholars drop their work at the end of each hour and look out of the win dow, 'I'heroe is a contest as to who can see the farthest, This rests and trains tho eyes and teaches observa tion, A woman who does line slewing for her living found her eyes strained and weak. Sho was advised to drop her sowing every half-hour and look for minute into space. Relief was quick, and the eye-strain disappeared, Short-sighted people who hold their book or work close will ease eye. strain and lengthen their vision if they frequently remove their glasses rnd look at some object on the horl son, The long-distanco training will not, however, relieve eye-strain that comes from astigniatinl, reckless dis regard of tho eyes, or...

Publication Title: St Arnaud Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A BERESFORD IN WAR-TIME. [Newspaper Article] — St Arnaud Mercury — 10 January 1914

A BERI!SFORD IN WAR.TIME, The I3eresfords have all been fa mous for the courage that borders on recklessness. Lord William Beores ford served in the Zulu War in 1879, winning the V,C., and in his book, "Campaigns of a War Correspondent," Mr. Melton Prior relates some striking stories of him:- In the retreat Lord \VWilliam Beres ford, turning around, saw the four legs of a white horse kicking in the air, Realising at onice that it belonged to one of our men, ihe rode straight for it, and found that the horse had been shot andl that the rider hatd fallen half stunned, "Get up!" Lord William said to the man, but hie seeomed to dazed to an swer; whereupon Lord William said, "If you don't got up at once I will Jump down and punch your head!" -at which the man did rise slowly. Lord Williamn succeeded in helping him on to the horse behind him; once mounted, the man clutched B3eresford around the waist, and so they gallop ed off. All the time thiu was taking place the Zulus were firing from...

Publication Title: St Arnaud Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MELBOURNE. PERSONNEL OF PARLIAMENT. [Newspaper Article] — St Arnaud Mercury — 10 January 1914

MELBOURNE, (1rom our own Correaspondent), PRISONNRL OF PARLIAMENT, Tucked away int a corner of the front bench of tho' Corner Party sits Mr, Alfred Downwnrd. Possessed of no commanding presence, with a steady flowing, indoeed, aet times, monotonous style of oratory characterised by no marked oresnoendo or diminuendo, the member for Mornington has still played no altogether insignifioant part in the Legislative drama, comedy, or, as not a few people deolare, hnrleenque. Per sonally I do not join with those who are continually snoeeringat and berating our Legislative institutions, If the d gnity of those institutions is some" times sadly besmirohed, if the cynical 14 Man in the Street" is every now and then afforded material forcontemptuous criticism and donunaiation, it is more the electors than the offending members who are 'really to blame, It is they who make. Parliaments, who select our lawmakers, and who have it in their power to relegate to private life those members who have b...

Publication Title: St Arnaud Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HEALTH NOTES. The Evil of Late Suppers. [Newspaper Article] — St Arnaud Mercury — 10 January 1914

HEALTH NOTEB. The Evil of Late 8uppora. Late or heavy suIppor are a coin l0on cause of insuolmia, especially that form of it in which people fall into a heavy sleep, only to awake with a start an hour o' Livo later and find themselves unable to slcep again until early morning perhaps. Digestion coniaon almnost to a dead stop during sleep, so that Huificient time should be allowed for the last meal to le dis poned of beforeo the hour for retiring. 'T'his interval 11ould be0 two hours at leasut, which mneans that half-past eight Is as a rule late enough for tlhe evening meal. In any case, thlie food which is taken then ought to be of a light nature, andl not include Dork, cold meat, or any other article of tdiet which is slow of digestion. Coffeeo (and strong tea are unsuitable at this liour, as thliey tiendi to cause sleep lessness., Cocoa, madle with water, is a iituch better heverage for use with tl e evening meal or after it,

Publication Title: St Arnaud Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SHIRE OF KARA KARA. DATES OF COUNCIL MEETING [Newspaper Article] — St Arnaud Mercury — 10 January 1914

SHIRE OF KARA KARA. DATES OF COUNCIL MEETING Theo Kara Kara Shire Council will meet on the following dates : F, bruary ... ,,. 5 Marob ,, ... ,,.. 12 April .. ... ... 9 May ... ",, ,,, 7 June ..,. .,. 4 July ...,,, ,, . 2 Augues ... ... , .6 September .. ...1 3 Outober ,,, ,,, ... 1 Oot ber .. ,,,,,, . 29 D Oc mhpr ., ,, 3 Captalin Amuondeen, the discoverer of the South Pole, intends to make an expedition to the North Pole, starting early in tho proe. sent year, The cost to estimated at £90,000, and, as the full sum has not been raised, a novel method bha been adopted to seoure It -the sending of poat.cards from the North Pole to all who ,roe to pay a mnodet feo for the card. Foar this purpoause a epeolal North Pole card has been tssued, Purchasere may address these to thebomaelves or their friouds, and sent them in a special envolope to Captain Amundson at San Franoieco, All sech oards will be taken on the " Frao; " right to the North Pole, if Amiundoon gets there With the coneeno ...

Publication Title: St Arnaud Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Impure Air and Scrofula. [Newspaper Article] — St Arnaud Mercury — 10 January 1914

Impure Air and Scrofula. 'The atmosphereo of all rooms should be frequently renewed by lproper ven tilation, The best method of accom plishing this has been for many years a subject closely studied by sanitar lans. In rooms, and especially in bed rooms, the lireplace should always be left unclosed, The windows should be pulled down from the top, and up from the bottom. All rooms, and es* pecially sleeping apartlments, should be well aired during the day. Impure air in bedrooms is considerd by emiin. eat medical authorities to be one of the most potent causes of coinsumption andl scroiula. A woll-hnown French physician who Ihas devoted much at. tention to studlies of this nature says: "It will often be found, on examina tion, that serofulous diseases are caused by vitiated air, and it is not always neoesary that there should have been a prolonged stay in such S- atmosphere. Only a few hours each day is sufficient; and a person may live in a moat healthy district, pass tlhe greater pa...

Publication Title: St Arnaud Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — St Arnaud Mercury — 10 January 1914

THE DYSPEPTIO'S HANDIQAP. The dyspeptio is sorely handlocapped in this life, If he is a ma.n he can't keep pace with his fellows because of tht weakness, the depression, and the outrting that indi. gestion inevitably brings in its train. If a woman, she often linde it impossible to carry out the daily household tislrs, or meot the demands of a business ocup stion hI a coss headaches, distreesing bilious atrace, pulpi tatlon, and sleeplessness are spoiling her lite. iThis strenuous age wants msesn and women of strong fibre, boundless encopy, and great choerfulnesi, but the dycpeptio is not amongat the number. How can Ihe expect to be? How can he hope to get through the day's work speedily and efliciently if his mind is clouded and his cyst em ct aged wit Ih the poisonous products of inegeostionl Bow can any rian, or woman eltlher, work well and cheerfully, whoen the wellkepringe of good health and streugt --the stomach, ever and bowels-are disorganlsed and weakened; It can't he done....

Publication Title: St Arnaud Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A DOUBTFUL BARGAIN. [Newspaper Article] — St Arnaud Mercury — 10 January 1914

A DOUBTFUL BARGAIN, The marriage ceremony as seen in America is often very quaint, accord ing to our staider ideas and traditions, In his "Wonder Book" the Reverend L, B. Bates, long associated with the East Boston Bethel, U.S.A., tells of an amusing marriage ceremony perform ed by his father: About nine o'clock one night the old parsonage on Cape Codl was approach ed by a man and a woman in a "one horse shay." Hearing the wheels, Father Bates went to the door, to see coming up the walk a buxom lass of two hundred pounds or so, followed by a very little man. With a giggle she announced: "We've come to be married, par son, haven't we, Bill?" An onergetic nudge succeeded in eliciting the desired affirmation from "Bill1." The parson examined the li censo and proceeded to business. "Please join your right hands," he said. "Dearly beloved, you are gath ered here for the purpose of holy ma trimony. Do you---' But he was here interrupted by the bride, "Say, parsou, before you go any far 1-...

Publication Title: St Arnaud Mercury
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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