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Elephind.com contains 8,145 items from Grenville Standard, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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THE ORIGIN OF THE HORSESHOE [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 16 January 1915

THE ORIGIN OF THE HORSESHOE Whether the Greeks and Romans shod their horses is a point still dis puted by antiquaries. Up to the pres ent, no clear and definite representa tion of a shod horse has been found among their sculptural relics. On the other hand, horseshoes have been found in France—and for the matter of that, in Paris, along the track of the old Roman way—which are conjectured (from the articles among which they were discovered) to date from the Roman occupation of Gaul. The logical conclusion is that the "barbarian" (Gaulish or German) light cavalry allies of the Roman army reiguiarly shod their shaggy ponies. These men probably formed the scouts and auxiliaries of the con quering armies of old Rome; the Ro man himself .was par excellence a foot soldier. There seems little doubt that the blacksmith-farrier existed in old Gaul, and it is just possible that the southern and more civilised tribes of the Ancient Britons might, have shod their horses. "Your Worship," said th...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 16 January 1915

For children's backing cough at nighfc, Woods' Great Pepperain* Cure, 1?

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A JOURNALIST'S "SCOOP." Bennet Burleigh's Great Ride. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 16 January 1915

A JOURNALIST'S "SCOOP." Bennet Burleigh's Great Ride. It was at Tel-el-Kebii' that Beimet Burleigh, whose death is so 'widely deplored in newspaperland, laid the foundation of his fame as a war cor respondent. His starlight ride across the desert has been thus graphically described by a journalistic comrade. "Burleigh went over the trenches with the fighting line; he took a brief survey of the scene—it >was only a few minutes' battle—his skilled eye read the salient facts, and a minute later he was galloping back to the field telegraph station at Kassassin, whence his brief preliminary message was the first intelligence wired to this country that Tel-el-Kebir was taken. "Promptly marshalling his facts, he followed this up by the first of his brilliant word pictures of battle scenes. "Without resting, he rode back to the scene of battle, to find that the cavalry brigade had been in hot haste despatched to Cairo. Despising the danger from prowling rebels, he dashed on alone after t...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Browns and Scarsdale Borough Council. Monday, 7th January. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 16 January 1915

Monday, 7th January. Present—Crs J. Daniels (mayor), D. Crosth waite, D. M. Aisbett, S. Statton. J. Wilkinson, H. Sharp, A. A. Edgar, and T. H. Crosth* waite. Correspondence.—From State Insurance Company with particulars relative to the in surance of council employees under Workers* Compensation Act.—From Public Health De partment, acknowledging receipt of pure food samples, and submitting report/ Re pardeil na-very, satisfactory.—From Govern ;menr!5tafci96/-pOin«Ing out' oonditiong'^to be observed in connection with the Country R'oads Board works,—From Public Works Department, asking the council to try and find work for the unemployed. Cr Statton moved that the annual inspection of the bor ough be made earlier this year than usual, as something may be found of a remunera tive character that could be carried out at once. Cr Edgar seconded the motion, re marking that charity began at home, and from what he could gather there would be a number of men out of work in the borough shortly...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AN INCIDENT OF THE WAR [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 16 January 1915

AN INCIDENT OF THE WAR "Really it is awful what we have to go through owing to the German spies, who simply overrun Prance," my friend remarked. "I will relate one incident which occurred, just to point out how careful we have to be. Near Arras there dwelt a Frenchwo man and her husband, whose conduct aroused suspicion. We made inquiries and found that she had formerly had a lover, a lieutenant of Uhlans, who lived in the district in time of peace. We noticed that each night she would go out to a wood in the neighbor hood carrying a basket, and return after dark. One evening we ordered a patrol of our cavalry to follow her. They overtook her on the way, where upon she became frightened and re turned to Arras. Our cavalry went on to the wood, and there surprised eight Uhlans under a lieutenant. "Our brave officer charged and shot two Germans, but then found he had no more cartridges in his revolver, or else that it had jammed. The re maining Uhlans fled as we approach ed, but we over...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MASTER OF ALL CHAPTER XVI.—Continued. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 16 January 1915

MASTER OF ALL BY ALMAZ STOUT Author of "Copper Under the Gold," etc., etc. Published by Arrangement with Cassell's Colonial Press, Melbourne. All Rights Reserved. CHAPTER XVI.—'Continued. Ten minutes later little Mollie woke up. "Daddy," she said, feebly, and looked around for him. Me was not there, but she caught sight of her mother close- beside her. "Mummy," she said. "Mummy " There was no answer. And Mollie began to cry, feebly.' "Mummy," she said, in her broken, weak voice; "Mollie wants some water." Again there was no answer, and the child, in her half-delirious weak ness, whimpered pitifully. She man . aged to wriggle to the edge of the bed, put out one tiny, fragile hand, and tugged at her mother's dress. "Mummy," she whispered again, her small strength almost exhausted, "Moiiie's firsty. Mollie wants water." But the mother was deaf to the voice of the child. Mollie lay still and spent tor a few minutes, and then she caught sight of the water-jug on a table a few feet away. ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Won by Wit. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 16 January 1915

Won by Wit. I In the reign, of Francis I. of France I quickness of wit was often more promptly rewarded than actual merit, j The monk, Regnier Mainus, did not lack merit, hut he owed his first ad j vancement, nevertheless, to a clever ' retort. i Francis, Avho was very fond of the game of tennis, was playing a match one day with Mainus. The monk finally ended the hard-fought game with a brilliant stroke. The King was somewhat <out of. hu mor on account of his defeat. "Remarkable!" he exclaimed, sar castically. "To think that such a stroke should he made by a mere monk!" "But, sire," replied the monk, who was as quick with his iwit as he <was with his racquet, "it is your Majesty's own fault that the stroke was not made by an abbot." A week later Mainus received his appointment as Abbot of Beaulieu. It is very seldom that you find hard work and hard luck going hand in hand.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Grenville Standard, PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY. Printed and published by HUBERT ALFRED ADAMS Sole Proprietor, at the office of the "Grenville Standard" newspaper, [?]lyde street, Linton, in the State of Victoria. Registered at the General Post Office, Melbourne, for transmission as a newspaper. SATURDAY, JAN. 16, 1915. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 16 January 1915

' p txBKisii E iT lif v n 8 V s at u it d a y . Printed and published by hubert ALFRED ADA.MS Sole Proprietor, at the offlce of the "Greuville Standard" newspaper, Olyde street, Linton, iu the Statu of Victoria. Registered at the General Post Offlce, Melbourne, for transmission as a newspaper. SATURDAY, JAN. 16, 1915. At the Scarsrlale Borough Council meeting on Monday, Mayor Daniels reported on the very courteous reception of the request to Grenvilleshire for a portion of their territory, and said he believed that the claims of the two boroughs would be favorably entertained. In reply to Cr Aisbett, the Mayor said that the additional revenue required was £70. Or D. Crosthwaite said that nothing could be fairer than their proposal* which was to take I in the bad with the good country. The rates received would be actually insufficient to keep the roads and bridges in repair. The Mayor said that if the boroughs were taken in by Grenvilleshire they would have to pay a Is 3d rate. With ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 16 January 1915

4-h.p. Single-cylinder Models, Free Engine, Spring Frame - - £59, 7-h.p. Twin-cylinder Models, from - - - £68. Write for illustrated Catalogue. MICHELIN BICYCLE TYRES,. 12 Months Guarantee, S2/6 eacSi. Sole Indian Agent for this District, 123 Sturt St., Ballarat. Tel. 505. Opp. Post Office. 'i'his Bank is open for :\11 classes of GENERAL. BAWKSftSG BUSINESS POST OFFICE BUiLDtWGS, Sturt & Lydiard Sts., BALLARAT -A;83 at r.«<5iboui-ne, Sydney, Newcastle, Broken Hill, Oubbo, Canberra., Ade laide! Perth, Hobart, Brisbane, Rockhampton, Townsville and London, Cable remittances made ro, and drafts drawn 0:1 foreign places direct. Foreign bills negotiated and collected. Letters of credit issued to any part of tne world. Bills negotiated or forwarded for collection. Banking and Exchange Business of every description transacted within the Common weaitn, United Kingdom mid abroad. Curreut accounts opened. Interest paid oa fixed deposits. Advances made against approved securi...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
St. John's, Soldiers' Hill. REV. J. BEST COMMENCES MINISTRY THE NEED OF PARTNERSHIP. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 16 January 1915

REV. J. BEST COMMENCES MINISTRY THE NEED OF PARTNERSHIP. The Rev. J. Best, the newly appoin ted vicar of St. John's, Soldier's Hill, commenced his ministry on Sunday. There were good congregations at both morning and evening services. In the morning the vicar delivered an appropri ate sermon, taking for his text 1 Samuel x„ 16 ; " There went with him a band of men whose hearts God had touched." During the days of theocracy in Israel, .wheli the judges judged, " there were periods "of depression, as well as periods of prosperity. The end came with the old mar? Eli, Samuel was a prophet who controlled the people of Israel for a time. Then the people of Israel said they would be as other na tions in that part of the world. They clamored for a change, and a change came ; a man, shy and retiring in dis position, was called to the head of the nation. The words of the text were the words of the historian of the event : " There went with him a band of men whose hearts God had touched." Fol ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Hampden Shire Council. Monday, Jan. 11, 1915. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 16 January 1915

Hampden Shire Council. Monday, Jan. 11, 1915. Present—Crs S. Manifold (president), I J. C. Manifold, W. M'Dowall, D. S. I Oman, M.L.A., Black, Currie, and Kelly. CORRESPONDENCE. ' From It. F. Thompson and a number of other ratepayers of Skipton, asking that the excavation of the Jubilee Park reservoir be proceeded with at once, as the supply of water has run out. Also that the thistle and rabbit pests in the park be attended to.—Referred to En gineer. • From Town of Ballarat East, suggest ing thut a protest- be made" by country municipalities against the proposal to increase railway freights.—Cr Oman said that he had indicated to the Go vernment in the House that it was hardly likely to obtain an increase in production if they increased railway freights. He would have preferred to increase the Income Tax, which would make the city man pay as well as the man in the country. Railway freights could not be increased in Town as they had the competition of the trams and motor buses to con...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE BLACK COW. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 16 January 1915

THE BLACK COW. General French's summary of oper ations recently issued by tlie Press Bureau -mentions some of the tricks of spies in the field. There is one that has been puzzling the French military authorities for weeks past. It is the mystery of the black cow. Just as gtipsies and beggars fre quently have a code of signals which they chalk on walls and hoardings, so has the German espionage depart | riient. Their spies are using all sorts | of roadside signs to indicate to their troops <what is ahead of them. The aign of the black cow has frequently been found. The sign was so crudely fashioned in black chalks or crayons that for a time nobody paid any attention to it except to remark on the dispropor tions of the animal. Now it turns out that it did not matter if the spy ar tists made his cow look pleasant or furious, or whether he exaggerated the length of the tail or horns. The size of the animal and the direction in which the animal's head pointed were all that mat...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
NO ELOPEMENTS IN GERMANY. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 16 January 1915

NO ELOPEMENTS IN GERMANY. One seldom hears of elopements in Germany, because it is impossible for young people to marry in that coun try without the consent of their par ents or legal guardians. Certain pre scribed forms must be gone through, or the marriage is null and void. When a girl has arrived at what is considered a marriageable age, her parents make a point of inviting young men to the house, and usually two or three are invited at the same time, so that the attention may not seem too pointed. No young man, however, is invited to the house un til after he has called at least once and thus signified his wish to have social intercourse with the family. In Germany a man must be at least eighteen years old before he can make a proposal; but when it is made and accepted, the proposal is speed ily followed by the betrothal. This generally takes place privately, short ly after which the father of the bride —as she is then called—gives a din ner or supper to the most intimate friend...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE HOUSEHOLD. SELECTED RECIPES. An Italian Dinner Suitable for the Australian Climate. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 16 January 1915

THE HOUSEHOLD. SELECTED RECIPES. An Italian Dinner Suitable for the Australian Climate. Italian Salad.—Half a pound hari cot beans, %lb. potatoes,, one beet root, some French beans, a lettuce, parsley, a sprinkling of onion, water cress, vinegar, oil, pepper and salt. Soak the beans over-night, and boil in salted water till soft, which will re quire a couple of hours. Also boil the potatoes, beetroot and French beans, and slice them. Put each vegetable on a separate small dish and dress with the vinegar and oil, and a sprink ling of parsley, onion and water-cress, with pepper and salt. Break up the lettuce and dress it with a little oil and vinegar. In helping, take a lit tle of each vegetable on the plate with oil and vinegar, and sprinkle with a modicum of grated cheese. Cold vege tables left from the previous meal can very well be used up in this way. The number of vegetables also may be reduced to those on hand. The Italian salad eaten every day ensures our getting plenty, with ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Off His Guard. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 16 January 1915

Off His Guard. Amohg the-members of a fashion able country club are a doctor and a minister, who delight in the exchange of repartee touching their respective professions. As they met one day, the minister observed that he was "going to read to old Thomson," adding, as he was aware that the old man was a pa tient of his friend the doctor. "Is he much worse?" With the gravest of expressions the physician replied. "He needs your help more than mine." Orf his guard, the minister ex claimed: "Poof- fellow! Is it as bad as that?" "Yes," was the reply; "he ie suf fering from insomnia!'-'

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER XIX. A Trusty Lover. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 16 January 1915

CHAPTER XIX. A Trusty Lover. After Dick had passed out of her life on that October afternoon, Syd ney at first seemed to live in a dull grey monotony. Feeling for a time was dulled and passive. She got up, went through the day, and went to "bed again like an automaton. But this unnatural state of course passed with time, and she set herself to build up her life anew. For Dick's sake she must rouse herself and make the most of what was left- of her life. The ■woman he had loved—she forced her self to put it that way, not the wo man he loved—must not be behind him in resolutely turning her back on a closed chapter and setting her face to the present. The future she would not think of. The vista of endless years, alone, growing older and duller and more solitary, was not one to face, so she rigorously forced herself to shut it out. Robert had no need now to com plain of her lack of "doing." She threw herself heart and soul into her work at the Crofton School, giving up three or four ev...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WOMAN AGAINST WOMAN. Why the Sex Treats Its Sisters with Contumely Though It Loves Them at Heart. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 16 January 1915

WOMAN AGAINST WOMAN. Why the Sex Treats Its Sisters with Contumely Though It Loves Then? at Heart. By Dorothy Dix. One of the most curious things in the world is the latent antagonism that women show toward members of their own sex. Of course, this is a matter of in heritance and tradition, bred-in-the bone sort of feeling that is the re suit of woman's age-long struggle for a husband. Her bread and butter, her position in society, her interest in life depended upon her capturing some male Avho would furnish her with a' home, and throw the glamor of his name about her, and so every woman's hand was against every oth er woman's, and she regarded every other woman who crossed her path with jealousy and suspicion. Now that woman has become self supporting, and marriage has become less alluring to her fancy than a career, she still cannot rid herself of this prejudice against her own sex handed down to her in her very olood from her foremothers. It has become what Darwin calls an ac qui...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER XVIII. Hand in Hand Once More. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 16 January 1915

CHAPTER XVIII. Hand in Hand Once More. It was not until many months after wards that Dick and Sydney met again. It Avas October, and mid-autumn had come. It had been a wet summer and promised to be a wetter autumn. Everything was dripping, and there seemed to be a veil as of tears over the world as Sydney saw it in London. She had fallen into the habit of strolling around the more unfrequent ed parts of the park almost every afternoon before or after tea. Nearly all her intimate friends were away from London, and she was feeling more solitary and alone than usual. On more than one occasion she had met Robert as she was mak ing her way to the almost deserted park, and he had suggested that she might find something a little more cheerful and a little less damp than the sodden walks and sadly dripping trees of the park. "It suits me," she answered, with a ghost of a smile. "I don't mind the dampness'. I love the trees and flow ers, though it's true the flowers are nearly spoilt, and it...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAPTER XVII. A Little Child. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 16 January 1915

CHAPTER XVII. A Little Child. I Sydney had made Robert send her news every day. Sli: would not, could not, call to inquire herself. But Robert "went each morning, and sent her a note or a wire with the latest bulletin. When the news became gradually more serious, she could not refrain any longer. She must let Dick know how deeply she was feeling for him, and she wrote him a short note of sympathy. He answered it with a few grateful words, and said he knew she would understand what he was goiug through, but they still hoped, though now it was almost against hope. After that Sydney did not write again. But every day she bought a few fragrant roses and sent them by Robert, with strict injunctions that he was not to say who sent them. But Dick seemed to know, and he always saw to it that they were in Mollie's room, where her eyes could rest on them, until even the one vase of sweet-scented roses was banished •from the room. There must be noth ing in it to take away one iota of the fresh...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 16 January 1915

CYCLE AND MOTOR CYCLE REPAIRS— It doesn't matter what's the matter with your machine—Cycle or Motor Cycle—send it to me. I'll guarantee to "fix it up." I don't employ " tinkers," but expert mechanics, whose sole aim is to turn out work that will give satisfaction. And that's what you WILL get if you let me do your work. Sole District Agent for England's premier Motor Cycle—the L.M.C. -I. A. HOLLAND — 107 STURT ST., BALLARAT. 3P 22: O E2 <3:96. Thousands are today in active service of ANDREWS" GEELONG STOVES Illustrated Catalogues and other literature referring to these famous Cooking Stoves, which enjoy the enviable reputation of being the LEADING STOVE on the Australian mar ket, will bo posted free—on receipt of post card or letter—to anyone, by C. ANDREWS, Solo Manufacturer and Patentee! Geelongi tfictoria. Write at orioe

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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