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Title: Seymour Express And Goulburn Valle... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 10,508 items from Seymour Express And Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook And Yea Advertiser, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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HARVEST FEASTS. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 2 January 1914

HARVEST FEASTS. The feasts that now take place at the close of the harvest season are small affairs compared with -he old fashioned iharvest. suppers held form erly. in some of the northern coun ties of England the farmers would give churns of cream, and it was served out on eups to the laborers. Nowadays a-glass of ale or cider is the.substitute for the old-time feast. In some paits of the North of Ireland the ancient custom still lingers as "the churn supper." A very old custom is the baking of a large cake by the farmer's wife. This is cut up and served out to everyone, including chudren accompanyzng the "norkey cart" in the sarmyard. The "horkey cart" was the cart on which the last load of the season was drawn to the farm.

GROUND LIMESTONE FOR ACID SOIL. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 2 January 1914

GROUND LIMESTONE FORuACID SOIL. An exhaustive comparison between limestone and quioklime has. been 'is sued by the head of one of-the Ameri can experiment stations. After ex plaining that the function of lime in the soil is two-fold-viz, to correct the acidity of the soil and to deoompose the soil itself-and showing .the effect ot these transformations, the writer dis cussed the kind of lime to use. There follows a sweeping condepnnation of quicklime, the use of whioh on soil which is already deficienrin' nitrogen and phosphates only serves to still:fur thor exhaust the soil of its meagre sup-' ply of these elements. It is true, the immediate effect is somewhat increased crops, but the continued use of lime, unless on soils exceedingly rich in or ganic matter, tends rapidly to exhaust tho soil and ultimately to leave it practically ruined. We'should use limo only to correct acidity of the soil, and this is necessary only where there is difficulty in obtaining a good stand and luxuri...

Longwood Races. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 2 January 1914

Longwood Races There .was a very large attend ance at the above races on Boxing Day.: The fields were large and the racing. good. Great praise is due to the stewards and the oficials and .above, all to the secretary, Mr J. Houston;'for- the excel:ent way in which the sports were-conducted. The Longwood racecourse is a very fine running 'ground, the public conveniences' being all that could be desired. 'The club:has spent a large sum on improvements, and as everything is- conducted " fair and above board : the club has'become popular with the racing fraternity. The racing .was gpodi throughout. M1r W. b'Cormaock, of Seymourl was very unfituinate in the Hurdle ,ace,- the first 'gvent of the day' with Pat M'Garry. He ooked very einch a winner, and, as a mat ter of fact, had the race all his own; when be stnick the:second hurdle in the. list wile, but not .leavily, and his jock fell off, but the horse continued galloping round -the track. This was a great disap polhitmeiit to many, as P...

Nagamble Regatta. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 2 January 1914

Nagamble - Regatta. There was a large attendance, the -weather conditions being all that could' be desired. The tak ings at the gate amounted to £50. Thirty-nine crews competed. In the Maiden Pairs: the Seymour .re presentatives (Messrs G. Lambden and Dave O'Callaghan) gave a good account of themselves, win ning the first heat quite easily, and were only displaced in the semi final by half a length.: A bad start was responsible for their defeat, where they lost about three lengths through missing their strokes. The following are the results: Maiden Pairs - Hawthorn I, Corio Bay- No. 2. Special Fours-Essendon 1, Na gambie 2. Maiden Eights-Civil Service 1, Nagambie 2,. South Melbourne 3. - Senior Pairs-Albert Park 1, Cobraml2. Junior Fours-Richmond' 1, Shep= parton 2, Nagambie 3. Maiden Fours- -Hawthorn 1,;_ Coric 2. Junior Pairs--Yarra Yarra 1, Nagambie 2. ":

St. Patrick's Day Sports. PRIZE MONEY INCREASED [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 2 January 1914

St. Patriok's Day Sports' PRIZE MONEY INCREASED A well attended committee meeting of the above was held in the school room on Sunday' last, when the pro= gramme for the forthcoming sports wvas-drawn up. It was decided to increase the prtide money to X72, by the inclusion of a number of military events, which, in addition to thte usual.contests, will comprise the most attractive programme of sports ever prcesen'ed ii Seymour. £22 has been allotted to the chop ping events; Sheffield handicap 11; Hurdle race, ~5 ; Quarter mile, £4; Ladies' Bracelet, £4 ; cadet races, shop assistant's race; and a number of other events have yet to -be ar ranged, and a ineeting for that pur pose will be held on Sunday morn ing next

DEATH OF LIEUT. ROGERS. BODY FOUND NEAR ORDERLY ROOM. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 2 January 1914

DEATH OF LIEUT. ROCERS. BODY FOUND NEAR ORDERLY ROOM. Sincere regret was expressed in Seymour when. it became knowvn that Lieutenant H. A Rogers, area officer for the 72a Regiment of Senior Cadets of the Hamilton and Casterton -districts, had- met his death under peculiar circumstances. The deceased officer was formerly stationed at Seymour. where he was very well known, having resided in the district practically all his life, until his transferrence-to Hamilton. The circumstances relating to his death, are reported in the Hamilton "Spectator" as follows :-On Thurs day and Friday Lieut. Rogers had been playing' cricket for Hamilton ! against the M.C.C. team on Mel ville:Oval, and- he was- seen again on Saturday morning. At about 2.30 on" Saturday afternoon. 'Mrs M'Donald, who lives at-out a chain away, heard a shot from the direc tion of the orderly room, but she did not see ant thing nor notice any body about. At about'five o'clock two little girls noticed him firing at the target,...

WHERE WOMEN RULE. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 2 January 1914

WHERE WOMEN RULE. SBritons are surprised that the American woman does not agitate more for political and social rights. One reason is that she has got them already. In this country the woman may not practise as a solicitor. In America she may be a Judge. A woman judge lives in Chicago. Her name is Mary Margaret Bartolme, and she heads the Court for Delinquent Girls. She is a Chicagoan by birth, and was educated in the public sohools. She graduated from the Law School of 'North-Western University in 1894 and took up general practice, specialising in probate law . In 1897 she was appointed Public Guardian of Cook County by Governor Tanner. She resigned this position upon her ap pointment to her present place. She is still comparatively young and according to the New York "Times, -has a keenly intellectual face, sensitive, sympathetic, and serious. "She is, perhaps, a trifle old-fashioned in ap pearance," the same authority pro ceeds, "dresses plainly and neatly and is certainly old-fa...

NEW SUN-SPOT THEORY. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 2 January 1914

NEW SUN-SPOT THEORY. Professor A. Arta, of the observa tory of the University of Santa Clara, announces that he has discovered that the activity of the sun in phenomena known as sun spots is intimately re lated to the distance of comets. He says that during a period of 164 years to date there have been 238 comets" (their returns included) that apparent ly have influenced the action of the sun, having their perihelia Loncid?ut ally with the minimuna of spot frequ ency. -Camphor as' a Vitalising Agent. .. ? Abroad, where great pride-and just pride-is taken in the mileage per gallon of fuel that can be obtained, a small band of motorists rcoenely has been experimenting with gum cam phor as a "dope" for gasolihne. Usu ally, about one ounce of camphor is placed in five gallons of gasohne, ana it is stated by those who.use the mix ture that the operation of their motors is much superior awith the camphor in the gasoline than without it. One motorist even goes so far as to claim that he ha...

MUSIC BY WIRELESS. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 2 January 1914

MUSIC BY WIRELESS. "When the Hirondelle, the Prince of Ehonaco's remarkable combination of yacht and scientifio laboratory, re cently entered New York larbour, her arrival was- made known to all the wireless stations in the vicinity by a concert, the- musio being heard 'and enjoyed by all who wore at the re ceivers of wireless apparatus," says the New York Herald. "The 'wire les piano' that was the source of this music is part of the wireless plant of the yacht, whioh is remarkable for its power and ingenuity. It is a German invention, but- is controlled by a French company.. " 'It always causes astonishment,' says the Prince. . "The voice of this sea swallow was due to a piano-like attachment to what is considered the most remark able wireless- equipment which: ever has come to this port. The 'notes may be -heard over sea and -land for. many a mile. Several incoming, ves sels, including- the Grosser -Kurfurst, of the North German Lloyd line, re ported -iearing siren strains - as th...

WIT AND HUMOR. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 2 January 1914

WIT AND HUMOR. "Little girl, have you lived hero your life?" "Not yet." ll What is better than presence mind in an accident ? Absence or body. bWhen a young man thinks a girl' piano practice is mnusic-that is love It requires a tactrul ianu to remem. ber a wonlan's birthluay an t yet or get her age. Isn't it surprising how- nany of your friends are broke when you an to borrow.iu "\Vny does he call his wife a dream; -"'ecause, like a lream, she is to good to be true." 'T'hj man vho ?loesn' soW a o few if?d oats in the spring is apt to put in a large lot i i.tite fall. Love's like the measles-all the worse when it comes tco late in life. 'Wihy is a hen 5miortal?' "..Dun no, why is she?" .'Because hersou never sets." son According to an American writer a platonio lover is usually a quiet Cla, who saves his money. "Hullo Brown . iow's your cold?" 'Very obstinate. How's your iweo? "About the same." A cynic defines "club" as the an cient inan's weapon beforre mar? e and ti?e moderu mIna's...

EDUCATIONAL PICTURES. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 2 January 1914

EDUCATIONAL PICTURES. There is a class of picture which I am afraid is already-doomed to failure as an educational aid I refer to the processes of manufacture and the growth of a plant or flower. Here, in the twinkling of an eye you have a ,plant grow, develop, and arrive at ma turity.. Yet in the schoolrooms of our progressive teachers you have the real 'plant grown in the germinating box. The child witnesses the slow develop mnet of the root and stem. The pro gress is noted in the drawing lessen and dated; In the senior classes the actual- growth is measured; with a time record and by the help of the me tric ruler, drawing and painntg les sons. a real idea of the growth of the plant is arrived at. Sense of time and proportion is presented to the child, but in the film the child knows it is:not real .it is 'only a fake," and the sense of thd unreal turns the child from It; It serves as a joke, but it is not soience. I tested a class of senior scholars, of an -intelligent standard. ...

THE VILLAGE SHOPKEEPER. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 2 January 1914

- THE VILLAGE SHOPKEEPER.; -A quaint story of an old woman who keeps. -vllage shop in lancashire is told in the "Manchester Guardian." A new -brand of biscuits had appear ed-in the-shop. and one of the holiday visitors to the neighbourhced had found them extraordinary, to his taste, an opinion which was apparently shar ed by other customers. - -But- when,, towards the end- of his stay in the neighborhood he came in for a fnal supply of them the was told that they had been sold out a -week before, so greot had been the run upon them. "But you will order more of them?" he asked.- 'No, no," said the old woman, "'ve gone back to the sort-I had before. I can't do with any more of that new sort.", Everyone kept ask ing for them, and they didn'" east me any length of time."

DESTROYING GRASS AND WEEDS ON PATHS. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 2 January 1914

DESTROYING GRASS AND WEEDS ON PATHS. Experiments as to the efficacy of ar senite of soda .or killing grass and weeds on garden paths were recently carried out by Mr. H. C. Coggins, As sitant Inspector of Agriculture. The experiment was arranged to test vari ous strengths, as follows: No. 1-1 lb. arsenite of soda to 2 gallons of water. No. 2-1 lb. arsenite of soda to 4 gallons of water. No. 3-1 lb. arsenite of soda to 6 gallons of water. No. 4-1 lb. arsenito of soda to 10 gallons of water. The path selected was a gravel one, 100" yards long, the edges. of which were covered with couch grass and small weeds. The experiment was carried out in December. the weather being hot and dry. The final examination showed than Nos. 1 and 2 killed the couch ana weeds, but Nos. 3 and 4 only partial'y killed them, and after thb heavy rains they revived, and are now growing vig orously. On Nos. 1 and 2 there was no growth of couch at all, and only a few weeds, the seeds of which were ap parently wash...

WOMEN AND WORK. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 2 January 1914

WOMEN AND WORK. My father he lft me no-what you call it?--he-itage. But he gave me the best gift in the world. The" idea to work. Oh. it is a great, good giftl To be independent, m'sieur, to .earn a little money for oneself--it is the moat splendid thing for:all the wo nlen. " Money I Every woman should win a tiny -bit of money by herself, her very own. m'sieurl The rich woman--she has enough, too much but is there not a newspaper to buy, to oommence, to publish with her idess,to nbusy herself, to give work to her brain? There are-poor men-and u-omen who starve; who want. help. There is always csarity- you under stand? There is always work is there not? I am a religious girl. I like religion more than most of the act resses. I work very.hard but always I find myself very glad to work a little bit harder for the sake of charity. Gaby Deulyai in the "Daily Chronicle"

"I BELIEVE"—AN EVERYDAY CREED. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 2 January 1914

"'I BELIEVE"--aN EVERYDAY CEE?D. I believe in my job. It may not be a very important job, but it is mine. Furthermore, it is Gcd's job for me. He has a purpose in my life with refer ence to His plan for the world's pro gress. No other fellow can take my place. It isn't a big place, to be sure, but for years I have been moulded in a peculiar way to fill a peculiar niche in the world's work. I could take no other man's place. He has the same claim as a specialist that I make for myself. In the end the man whose name- was never heard beyond the house in which he lived, or the shop in which he. worked, may have a larger place than the chap whose'name has been a household word in two contin ents.. Yes, I believe in my job., I believe in my fellowman. He may not always agree with me. I'd feel sorry for him if he did, because I my self do not believe some of the things that were absolutely sure in my- own mind a dozen years ago. May he never lose faith in himself because, it he does, he ma...

A JUNGLE TALE. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 2 January 1914

SAJUNGLE TALE. The gentleman whose forty years among tne big game of Bengal, Mr. Gouldsbury, has recorded in his latest book, "Tigerland," must surely get the palm for modesty. He will not suffer his identity to be revealed. We learn that as a lad he stole aboard a vessel bound- for Newfoundland, de serted, and joined another ship, and was borne to the East Indies On the out k of the Sepoy Mutiny he en tered the Bengal Mounted Consta bulary, and when this trouble was overpast he attached himself to the newly-raised police force. It was then that his fun began with tiger, leopard, and bear. The sportsman in India has (often at least) an excuse for his slaughter which other hunters. can seldom advance. In slaying big game (at considerable risk to himself) he may be, and frequently is, safe-guarding the iye stock of the peasant :- - "During the course of my tour, for example, it was no uncommon cccur renoe, while marching through or halt ing near a vllage, to find the people in a panic...

SUNLESS ROOMS. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 2 January 1914

SUNLESS ROOMS. A room which does not admit sun shine is dark and gloomy, and must have a decided effect on the spirits of its occupants. Parents will often choose the best room in the house for a drawing-room-an apartment seldom much occupied by the family - while such rooms as the nursery, dining-room, and bedrooms often lack sunlight, not to speak of their vital deficiencies. Is it a wonder that childien do not thrive 'in dark, depressing nurseries? One has only to realise what it means for ten der. growing children to lire out the long winter days in a sunless room, and then we would also realise how cruelly they are being treated by parents who may be willing to sanoifice everything but 'their best Tooms-for their ?hild ren. Such is the mistaken value which people set. on the mgre accompaniments of life, while they leave its essentials to take care of themselves.

THE NERVE DOG. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 2 January 1914

THE NERVE DOG. I ho "Washington Herald" gives the [following : "Our product is thoroughly tested before' leaving the factory. No man can sell stuff to-day that has not been tested. "We manage to sell our product witiout otesting it." " ,That's odd. ' What do you sell?" ý, "Dynmite;"'

TRIAL BY TOBACCO. [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 2 January 1914

TRIAL BY. TOBACCO. Narcotic justice isbetterTworth while' than sleepy isjustice. . This may:. be . proved by a ..tale told by a- corres pdondent of the "Manehester Guardian" -. A friend of Ihis w, on a jlry at an i assizeo and a prisoner: was- being tried oni a chIarge for which, if oonvicted, he " would" have -gone to prison fur n very , long term indeed.: Eleven of. the :jury believed biin guilty; the friend of.: the correspond ent; a man of an excellent mind, acute, 'accustomed to weigh .vidence, was con- vinced that the prisoner wasininnocent. -The jurly wrangld awway m retirement -or rather the eleven, wrangled about the one.. The one removed himself pla -cidly to a far corner- of the room,re :fused: to give ear to. the wrangle, and smoked. The, last word is to be em-: phasised.. The single dissentient-'discovered. at onoe .that ho was the only member of :the jury provided with adequate 1sup plies of tobacco. : Hours passed; the eleven grew less and less energetic; the one resm...

DO YOU KNOW [Newspaper Article] — Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser — 2 January 1914

DO YOU KNOW What Giving the "Cold Shoulder" In dicates? -It was customary at one time to set before a guest who had outstayed his welcome a cold shoulder of miutton. in place of one.hlited for his pleasing, as a broad hint for him to depart speed ily. The phrase has long survived the studied usage. - How the Symbol" "Cit" Originated P I 'h.origin,.nf-hes very com.?mn yL or hundredwv:ight is s.??p: U is the initial of f".h Lain wo'rd "cru ture," ina.ion g i i.ied, an'd we ar" the ifirst and !i ° i",tters oi the .ord -.re:" orig6'nicd iro:u. Whein Englhl i nr.s ? r lked ?tci-d. er- and venison, pasties - were commonly seen upon the. tables of the well-to-do, the inlerior.aud refuse peor tions of the doer-termedl:"the umbles' -were generally appropriated by the poor., who made them into a pie; hence "umblo pie" became suggestive of po verty, and. was alterwerds applied to degradations of other kinds. Why Three Volleys :are Fired over a Soldier's Grave. The usage is in relation to the H...

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