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Elephind.com contains 118,866 items from Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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How to Exterminate Fleas. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 7 September 1898

How to Exterminate Fleas. Perhaps thp following will be found useful for destroying fleas In a baby's bed: — First olean away all dust, then with a small brush wet every corner and und'er or 'between every lathe with paraiun on. i-ne sraeu win soon go away, and will not harm the little- one. It Is best to have two ticks for the cot. Every week or two empty -the tlok and spread the flocks out on a wrapper, in the sun if possible, then pick up carefully and put into the clean tick. Beds treated in this manner with paraffin oil in Maroh and August (tho breeding time of fleas) have been perfectly free from the pests.

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BURIED ALIVE. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 7 September 1898

BURIED ALIVE. There is a ghastly horror in the mere mention of tho fact that a human beiog has been buried alive, and yet, shocking as it is, there is a tribe on one of tho Philippine Islands known as the Ahetas who havo the cruel custom of bury ing the sick before death. So soou as a high fever ssts in the patient is taken out of his hue, wrapped in his old clothes, and rudely deposited in a grave. But 00 sooner has the body been placed in the grave, than it becomes at once apparent to bis rela tives, according to their traditions, that bis death (which should be more properly termed murder) must be avenged. Accordingly the warriors of the tribe sally forth with lance and arrow to slay the first living creature they en counter, whether it be man, woman, child, or ild beast. When thus in quest of an expiatory victim they take tho precaution of breaking off youug shoots of. the shrubs as they pass by, leaving tbe broken ends bunging in tho direction they are going as a warning t» tra...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A COLD PARAGRAPH. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 7 September 1898

A COLD PARAGRAPH. A well-known traveller, in describing life in Siberia, gives a humorous account of a dinner at which ho was present. Ho says : ' Our dinner-party in tho oyening— and it was really a dinner-party— was extremely merry. Each ono laid his stores under contribution. Some brought out frozen broad, others frozen, caviare, othors frozen preserves, others again sausages which could not be bent, oven if put across the knee aud pulled with both arms. ' Can you imagine without laughing the appearance presented uf seven half-famished people sitting at a table with thirty different dishes before them, and unable to touch ouo except at the risk of breaking their teeth ? Nothiug could bo done except to wait patiently for the various dishes to be thawed. ' Gradually as each article of food softened, faces brightened, and when at last a knife entered one of tbe dishes there were shouts of triumph, which announced tho beginning of tho meal. At the close of tho dinner we ate ex cellen...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A LIKELY LASS. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 7 September 1898

A LIKELY LASS. At the refreshment stall of a bazaar the ladies were dressed as servant maids and tbe gentlemen as waiters. Many of tho visitors took them for what tbey affected to be, and huge, fun was occasioned bv tbe furtive tins whi oh tbey had given to them by people whom they served. At first the gentlemen wero inclined to look upou the tips as taking them down some what ; but soon thoy entered into the fun of the thing, and took all that was offered, even down to tbe bumble twopence, and banded tbe proceeds over to swell the bazaar funds. The greatcBt joke, however, was tho action of a stolid Yorkshire farmer, who paid a visit to the bazaar and bad a cup of tea. ?' Thee's a likely lass,' he said to tho titled lady who was trailing ou him. ' My wife aud I are getting old, and ivo could do with just such a handy lass as thee abaht tbe house. If ever tha'rt o' want o' a place, coom thn ciiihn to our farm an' speak lot' missus ' 'I'm afraid 1 riionldn't suit you,' replied the you...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE PAINTING ON THE WALL. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 7 September 1898

THE PAINTING ON THE WALL. In Floronce, so Ioiir ago that) centuries intervene, a woman was performing hoc oventido'clutios in a humble, unpretending house on tho Via San Gnllo, where Inter a famous and 'exquisite palace raised its noblo proportions, bho was a woman of tho people, and as she worked sho eang a Venetian lullaby, that sounded sad and sweeb as tho silver tinkling of a luto. Sho was alono, and wlion a sudden knock came to her door, sho started nnd ceased singing, nob knowing that she hnd told her atory of sorrow in her tonder ballad. But with the confidence of good citizen' ship she opened tho door, and saw by t.b( swinging lamp's rod light a youth with a romarknble countenance, so sweeb and ein core was its expression, nnd of a sliglib, graceful figure, clad in a Roman tunic, opon at hiB white throat, around which ten drils of long wuvy hair clung with pic turesque effect. A cup of grey velvet covered hia head. The woman noticed that his hands were white ; the fingers su...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MISS NUNN'S TIP. A TALE OF THE LEGER. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 7 September 1898

MISS NUNN'S TIP. A TAIE. OF THE LEGEB. |\ N EXCELLENT [\ person I' Mrn. Lati fffl \ mer'9 lanEuid tones Ssffibl had acquired for ygs^W^ onoi a note .f in ITl&^^eieat. 'Manages ILl'lft tbe boy admirably, S* $Wl aD(t is Petfectlr uo' ? ' rim objectionable in ~r5$-? &, mas nor and oppear |j M ancB. No tiresome Hi *'ts an(' eraces '''' »» faneioa. Such a comfort I' 'Where did you dig up this trc»aure ?' absently aiked her brother-in-law. ' She liTod somowhere in (Veatbourne-turrace with a Mrs. Gilbertion. I had a personal ohur ?oter — all most satisfactory.' 'Very.' Rupert Latimer, stifling a ynwii, 6«t up and walked to the window. Governesses did not interest him. 'And how's Tomraasina p Pretty well ?' he inquired briskly. Mrs Latimer shriiggad bis shoulder*. 'My dear Rupert, why ask mo P By this time you must know that my iguorance of nil racing matters is only equalled by my indifference to 'them. If you want 'information apply at head quarters.' ' All right, I will, ...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HISTORIC PENS. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 7 September 1898

HISTORIC PENS. 'Many of the pens which have signed great treaties, documents giving life or dealing death, or which have put in black and white books which will live through tho centuries, are still in existence,' said one of the greatest unti quarian authorities in this country to a contributor. 'Even taking modern examples, one of the treasures yet remaining to the terribly bereaved Empress Eugdnie is a pen made out of a golden eagle's feathers, and mounted with gold and diamonds, and which was used by the fourteen plenipotentiaries who signed the Treaty of Paris. Sir Walter Scott was constant to one pen for long periods, and, tbe much-cut-down quill with which he wrote ' Waverloy ' is still in existence. But I might say that there are scores of important collections of historic pens, such o« tha pen with which Qusen Elizabeth signed tho death-warrant of Mary Queeu of Scots. This svub taken away by a nobleman high in office, and handed down to his succes sors, who disposed of it m...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Raiment. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 7 September 1898

Raiment Purple shows a welcome decadence. Hats are to be worn tilted slightly te one side. Lapels and collars have become much smaller. Black feathers deck all tho newest headgear, tied as a rule with black vel vet. Huge neck ruffles are still a mode ' of the moment, but should be foresworn by the woman to whom Nature has de nied length of throat. Elbow sleeves are in greater favour than they have been for a long time, and they are nearly always finished with a Mil, whether of lace or of the material of which the sleeves themselves are made. The beauty and value of pearls de pend on their colour, form, texture (skin), transparency (water), and lustre. A pearl to be perfect must possess tho following qualifications : — It must be perfectly round or drop^shapod, and have a (perfectly pure white colour, must bo slightly transparent, free from specks, spots, or blemishes, and must possess the peculiar lustre characteristic of a gem.

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Things to Try. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 7 September 1898

Things to Try. Steaming an old fowl before roasting, not adding the stuffing untll'it goes in the oven, but putting a few sticks of celery Inside to flavour it. Adding a little vinegar to tho water in which salt fish Is soaked. Soaking salt N fish in sour milk to freshen them. A palette kn'lfe for scraping kettles. Three teaspoonfuls kerosene in the boiler In washing clothes. For sewer gas, chloride of lime. For disagreeable odours, a pinch- of sulphur on a hot stove. Covering a dish table with zinc. Keeping steel knives from rusting by dipping In strong soda water,: wiping, rolling In flannel, and laying In a 'dry place. Simmering rice flour and water to gether for a cement. ^.i A clamshell for scraping kettles. A little copperas water and salt in whitewash. Washing an Ink stain In strong: salt water, then sponging with lemon Juice; A canton flannel knife-case,': stitched Into compartments. To banish rats, chloride of lime. Sweetening wooden or iron .ware by scalding in hot water a...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 7 September 1898

Clara : ' Mr. Nlcefello said my face was classic. What is olassic ?' Dora : ' Oh, most anything old.' ' I should think,' she said sympatheti cally to the young man who acts, ' that you would get tired of saying the same thing over and over.' ' No,' he an swered with pensive sadness, ' It Isn't that that makes us tired. It's hearing the same thing over and over when we '?' ask for the. salary that never cams.'

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
POLICE COURT. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 7 September 1898

POLICE COURT. On Monday last tlio following casss were disposed of at the local polico court by Mr. Murphy, P.M. : . , . ? Janiea Hawlhorno, unlawfully depaatur tnnug swirio in Perry-street, South Gun daoai. ifraod 10s and cnnta. A ni-ni.«« v,f keoping pigs \yithin 40 yards of Mtf-st.- was preferred against the same defeudant, for whioh he waa mulct in the Bum of 20s. John MoNaniara, allowing two horses to stray ux tho Blre'ets. l?iued 2a 6d and coats. ? ? : Henry Preostone, not sending his adopted daup-hter, JobsIo Freestone to school t h required number of daya, aa prescribed by the Act. Fined ]s and coats 7a 6d. Joseph John McMahori waa brought up on a charge of being of unsound mind, and was (discharged, Dr. Gabriel testifying that MoMahbn waB now fit to be at large. In the Small Debts Court; several cases wero disposed of, »

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
How to Clean Kid Gloves. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 7 September 1898

How to Clean Kid Gloves. - Glove Cleaning Paste. — NO. 1. Take Eau de Javelle (a solution of chloride of soda), 135 parts ; solution of ammonia, 8 parts ; soap, In shavings, 200 parts ; and water, 150 parts. Make into a paste, and rub on and off with a clean piece of soft flannel. No. 2. Have a small quantity of milk In a dish, and a piece of curd soap, or honey soap, in another dish. Fold a clean, soft nap-, kin three or four times, and spread tfie glove smoothly on It. Dip a piece of flannel In the milk, and rub It well on the soap. Hold the glove firmly with the left hand, and rub It with the flannel towards the fingers. Continue this operation' until the glove — If white — ap- pears of a dirty yellow, or— If coloured— until It looks dirty and spoiled, ami then lay it to dry. Gloves cleaned by this method will be soft, glossy, and elastic. No. 3. Put the gloves on your hands, and wash them In camphlne until they are quite clean, rubbing them exactly as If washing your hands. When...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Well-read Girl of the Period. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 7 September 1898

A Well-read Girl of (lie Period. We are staying in a country-house, and our hostess, who has noticed that we spend a good deal of our time in the library, informs us one night that we are to take Miss ? down to dinner. ' I am sure that you will set on capit ally with her, she is so fond of books and so very well read.' Possibly our hostess gave our fair companion the cue, or was it out of deference to our gray hairs and general 'fogoylsm that she foroiiore to discourse on balls, matinees, and other social sub jects, and did not profess anxiety to know whether we danend, or hunted, or played golf, or were fond of music ? No, our fair blue-stocking— for if she did not look the part she made a laudable at tempt to play it— inaugurated a con versation by a reference to the literature of the day. ' You are very fond of reading, are you not ?' 'I read a little sometimes.' 'We'll, I read a very great deal. I am. devoted to books. I have just fin ished'— here she mentioned one of our three-...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Lion-keeper at the Zoo. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 7 September 1898

? ' ''.:?'? — : ? ?— ? A Lion-kccper at -the Zoo. In the July number of the ' Windsor Magazine' appears an interesting in terview with Soth Button, who for more than forty years has been the keeper of the large carnlvora at the Zoo. The old lion-keeper explalnod that the secret of his success was ' JU6t keeping quiet. I went about them slowly and never flus tered them in any way with a sudden motion or noise. If.a tiger didn't want to move I never forced It. They don't forgive' you if you do. A bear may be friendly enough when ifs a cub, but a full-grown bear is always Unsafe to handle. A Polar bear you can never tame. A man never really gets the bettor of a Polar. Some one has said I lint I treated lions and tigers like dogs, and lionesses, tigresses, and leopards and pumas, like cats. I never would touch a lioness with the hand, and tho leopards very soWom. I saw every night and morning to the shifting of the boasts to and from night and day quar ters, and .did everything for them...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LARGE FAMILIES. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 7 September 1898

LARGE FAMILIES. Onok more wo havo an. announcmont of four births at a time. The news o mes from Italy ; tho last time it was from Ireland. The quartette of little Irishmen, however, all died soon after birth ; the young Italians are reported to be living and doirirz well. and are to have a public f oto in teeir honor when they are christened (writes ' Viola' in the Age). Italy, how ever, has before now done greater things than tbie, A fow years ago it is crenibly reported that on Italian mother gave birth to no less than six biys at onp lime, Tho Italian news papers in 1885 commented on tho remarkable achievement ot this peas ant pair, Granata and his wife, and appeared to bo agreed that there waB no doubt about tho facts. It is very well known that one multiple birth is very apt to he followed by another in the same establishment,- but it can seldom have happened that this ten dency has' been so strikingly illustra ted as in .tli'-'i/Jtio, 'i^t'ie £aai6 were correctly given. Signor...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Romance in Real Life. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 7 September 1898

Romance in Real Life. ??'-??♦ ? ? It is a trite but at tho same time true remark that the roal incidents of lifo constantly occuriug around ub possess far more romantio interest than tho fanciful ones conceived in the teeming brain of the novelist. O£ this ths following true tule will furnish an illustration :— Some years ago there wae a rebel lion in Canada, and after tho 'patriots' were subdued some were summarily executed, and a portion banished for a long term of years to Australia. Moat of these latter were men with families, from whioh they wero torn without mercy. With one of these expatriated men our tale has chiofly to do. For seven or eight weary years he had borne the hardships of lonely captivity, hope less of eter seeing home or friends again, whon a gonoral amnesty was proclaimed by the British Government in regard. to all, with one or two ex ceptions, of those who had been con cerned in tho rebellion. Our hero was now at liberty, and his first thought was to seek hia ...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Blase Babblings. The Biter Bit. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 7 September 1898

Blase Babblings. By a BiBUtoys Battler / The Biter Bit. i - — * ? — The other duy, as wo, in oompany ?with a friohd, wore ' nursing tho buby' at a looul pub. a mulberry uosed individual- accosted -us and claimed acquaintance. In popular . parlaneo — local, of courae — the battler ' might aptly havo been termed a ' bull's-wool,' as' he was scraggy, dirty and besoddoned. Despite his unkempt appearance wo recognised in him a man whom we had known as a. person of affluenoe and wealth; so wo ordered an extra ' sohiolror,' anil after that we 'had another one,' and then the old battler's flood-gatea of reminiscence were unbolted, and, among other interesting stories, the _? following — in whioh he was an actor .' — Wos told by him, and we gire it as near the mark as possible i— ' Somi: years ago two brothers, by. tho name of WreD, kopt a,, sporting hostelry in the classic to-wn of Cam bridge (Eng.), which, was much fre quented by a.,!l'iast' set of uuder graduates;'wlio wore there enabled ...

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
COOK AND Co. REPORT [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 7 September 1898

Cook and Co. bepobi — Store Sheep.— Good demand for all de scriptions, especially wethers and dry ewes, .which are very scarce. A few people in the district are fully stocked. Store Cattle.— So farverv faw ennd duTo have been mado, aa it is rather early in the season yet, but with the good rains wo have had Utely a demand must shortly set in. I- at Bhoep and cattle are very scarce and sell readily at good prices. Primo wothors are worth to 10a 6d, ewes to 83 6d. Prime bullocks 22s 6d per 1001b in fpaddock, and medium to 20a. ?

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Good When Genuine. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 7 September 1898

Good When Genuine; The slim, blue^eyed young man who teaches school had been reading the comic periodicals and waxed apprehen sive. 'I'm really afraid,' he said, 'that this 'now woman' Idea is going to cut more of a figure than we think it Is.' 'Wnat maices you airum i nmuiruu in« old gentleman with rugged features and kindly eyes. 'Why, there are getting to be so many new women, you know.' 'And I'm glad to see it. I go to every high school and seminary commence ment. Those are the places to see the new woman in perfection. She is un familiar with all but the poetry of life, and she sees things with the eyes of the idealist. She believes In the best, and thinks that everybody else Is going to help her to hustle this world right along into the millennium before it knows what has happened. Young man, don't you be worried about her. It Isn't the new woman — the genuinely new woman — who Is likely to raise a disturbance.- It's the old woman who Is trying to be fresh.'

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Linen Lace. [Newspaper Article] — The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate — 7 September 1898

Linen Lace. Linen lace In the old country 'is one of tlie ndwest of ti'iimim'ings, and is being used oh many of the Ascot dresses, with Which modistes -boWi In Paris and Lon don aro bow fully occupied. It is linen so cleverly cut out and embroidered, tlie 'intervals so sKUiuily tilled in wun flne and varied Stitches, that it exnel-Jy resemfiyies lace. A seaiweed pink and brown foulard is made With a collar and epaulettes of -Mils lace lined with pink and finished a't the nock and waist with 'pink ribbons. Another foulard w'ith an ivory -white ground and a do sign of tall ni'auvo lilies intertwined and forming, floral stripes has a shal low, wavy yoke of the linen lined with heliotrope and a shaped corselet 'belt of the isame.

Publication Title: Gundagai Independent And Pastoral, Agricultural & Mining Advocate, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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