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Elephind.com contains 34,373 items from Ararat Advertiser, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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CULTIVATE. [Newspaper Article] — The Ararat Advertiser — 3 January 1914

CULTIVATE. 'Fore the soil begins to bake, Cultivate! Stir it up for culture's sake. Cultivate! Tillage hinders 'vaporation, Tillage works weeds' 'radication, Tillage helps food 'laboration. Cultivate! If it rains and lays the dust, Cultivate! If it pours and forms a crust, Cultivate! Save the moisture hygroscopic, Help the microbes microscopic, Talk to neighbors on this topic. Cultivate! If your head begins to swell, Cultivate! Harrow, crush it, pound it well, Cultivate! Cultivate a humble heart, Give "Big I" a meaner part, Let the germ of culture start, Cultivate!

Publication Title: Ararat Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
NATURE'S LAWS. [Newspaper Article] — The Ararat Advertiser — 3 January 1914

NATURE'S LAWS. Nature is a generous mother, but an ugly step-mother if one attempts to cross her purpose. The great mistake of many farmers is in trying to be penny-saving, in buying cheap seed, working with tools unfit for the pur- pose required of them, and mating their animals with inferior sires, against nature's laws. There is but one result. Nature goes on with her business and the breeder comes to grief and is ready to sell out. He simply worked at cross-purposes with nature. She does not advertise her intentions, nor cry them through the streets, yet she speaks in no uncer- tain language to the listening ear. If the breeder works in unison with na- ture's laws, he is all-powerful and his success sure.

Publication Title: Ararat Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Writers, Not Lingulsts. [Newspaper Article] — The Ararat Advertiser — 3 January 1914

Writers, Not Linguists. The late M. Rochefort was asked one day if, during his periods of exile in England, he had learned to speak English. "No," he replied. "But you could have done?" he was asked "Yes, but I didn.ot want to." "Why?" "Because Victor Hugo forbade me to. He said to me one day, 'We wri ters must not learn foreign languages. Such knowledge makes us run the risk of changing the purity of our own tongue.'"

Publication Title: Ararat Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AN EDUCATION TEST. [Newspaper Article] — The Ararat Advertiser — 3 January 1914

AN EDUCATION TEST. A professor once told his pupils that he should consider them educated in the best sense of the word when they could say "Yes" to every one of the questions that he should put to them. Here are the questions:- Has education given you sympathy with all good causes and made you espouse them? Has it.made you public spirited? Has it made you a brother to the weak? Have you learned how to make   friends and keep them? Do you know what it is to be a friend yourself? Can you look an honest man or a pure woman in the eye? Do you see anything to love in a little child? Will a lonely dog follow you in the street?   Can you be high-minded and happy in the meaner drudgerles of life? Do you think washing dishes and hoeing turnips just as compatible with high thinking as piano playing or golf? Are you good for anything to your- self? Can you be happy alone? Can   you look out on the world and see anything else except £ s. d.? &nbsp...

Publication Title: Ararat Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
KITCHEN WRINKLES. [Newspaper Article] — The Ararat Advertiser — 3 January 1914

KITCHEN WRINKLES. When cleaning knives damp them before rubbing on the board, as they produce a better polish and clean much quicker. Handkerchiefs that have become yellow can be made snow-white by soaking them in pipeclay and water for twenty-four hours. Boil the corks before bottling pick- les, etc. While hot they can be press- ed into the bottles, and when cold they seal them tightly. To make linen easier to write on when marking it dip the piece to be marked in cold starch, and the pen will write without scratching. To impart a delicate odor to linen, saturate a piece of cotton or blotting paper with oil of lavendar and place it among the various articles. When blowing out a candle, blow upwards instead of over the light, and the candle will not gutter, but will burn evenly next time. A little bag of sulphur suspended in a bird cage is not only healthy for the bird, but keeps away the parasites with which some birds are infested. When cooking greens a small piece of butter added...

Publication Title: Ararat Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HUMUS. [Newspaper Article] — The Ararat Advertiser — 3 January 1914

HUMUS. Aim at keeping up your humus sup- ply (vegetable matter), as this is the first thing a plant looks for. It must be in the soil to enable the three es- sentials to plant life-phosphoric acid, potash and nitrogen-to thoroughly perform their functions. Where the humus is absent the three very neces- sary essentials named would be of ab- solutely no value during a hot, dry spell. Even in a favorable season, with moisture forthcoming, the relief would only be temporary, and a dry pinch will pull it up at once. Not so where the humus is incorporated in the soil, for, apart from its functions as moisture conserver-which alone is invaluable to plant life-it sets up certain bacterial action which makes more available any plant food that is in the soil, in an insoluble form, and the soil is better able, where this vegetable matter is in abundance, to respond to any application of commer- cial fertilisers. Always aim at keep- ing up the "body" of your land by adding green manure crops. ...

Publication Title: Ararat Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WHAT THE HORSE THINKS. [Newspaper Article] — The Ararat Advertiser — 3 January 1914

WHAT THE HORSE THINKS. Give a horse a chance. There is time enough after that to make him go. A horse naturally becomes more or less like its driver. Most balky horses are made so by their drivers. Never whip a horse because you are angry. A good teamster gains the confi- dence of his team. A horse should be made to fear the whip rather than feel it. Teach a team to pull a light load right and they will pull a heavy load right. Never train a team on a heavy load. Never scold a team for breaking an evener. Load light at first and heavier after- wards. Never pull a team when they are out of breath. Do not allow a team to stop at will, but stop them soon afterwards. Short stops and often is a good rule for resting horses. A horse that will stop when he is told to will seldom run away. It is all right for your horse to have speed if you never find it out. Move a little yourself to get started, instead of asking your team to make up lost time.

Publication Title: Ararat Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ORIGIN OF THE HONEYMOON AND OTHER MARRIAGE CUSTOMS [Newspaper Article] — The Ararat Advertiser — 3 January 1914

ORIGIN OF THE HONEYMOON AND OTHER MARRIAGE CUSTOMS One is sometimes tempted to won- der why newly-married people think it necessary almost immediately after the wedding to run away from all their friends and acquaintances. When the delights of foreign travel are in prospect, this course of conduct is not surprising, but why in the name of common-sense - so we are inclined to ask should the bridal pair accept, as they often do, the loan of a friend's house, where, cut off from social and domestic duties, they no doubt exper- ience the ,woes of utter boredom, for even billing and cooing must occasion- ally pall? Many there are who have cautiously allowed that the honey- moon spent under the most favorable conditions has its drawbacks. Yet, common-sense notwithstanding, it is an institution that will probably last till the end of time. We are disposed to question why the custom ever ex- isted, and the reason is not far to seek if we only know where to search for it. The honeymoon is, i...

Publication Title: Ararat Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE HOMING INSTINCT OF A CAT. [Newspaper Article] — The Ararat Advertiser — 3 January 1914

THE HOMING INSTINCT OF A CAT. A wonderful instance of the homing instinct of a cat is described by a correspondent of "Country Life"— "Our chauffeur's daughter recently came by rail from her home in Car- diff to visit her father at Ripon. She brought with her, in a basket, an ordinary black tom-cat, which she has had four years, intending to leave him with her father. After the first day in his new home, while his mis- tress was still here, the cat disap- peared and could not be found. In- quiries elicited the fact that a black cat had been seen on the railway which passes near the house. Ten days later a letter arrived from Car- diff saying that the cat had come home. "He was in an exhausted state, with all his claws worn off and the flesh of his toes abraded. The distance be- tween Ripon and Cardiff is fully two hundred and fifty miles. The cat must therefore have travelled nearly thirty miles a day. Physically that is a fairly good feat. But, if he re- turned by the way he came, ...

Publication Title: Ararat Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TRIFLES. [Newspaper Article] — The Ararat Advertiser — 3 January 1914

TRIFLES. Do you remember them: the little things That made the currents of your life to smoothly flow? The smile the word of cheer, the warm hand-clasp That helped you-in the fading long ago? Do you remember, when the still night brings Reflection, retrospection, all that made you strong, The kindly glance, the whispered word of hope, The unknown singer's brave, inspir- ing song? Do you remember, when the days were dark,   And hope seemed dying, and grim, black despair Had gripped your heartstrings-that a friend appeared As if in answer to your unvoiced prayer? Do you remember, then, the kindly folk Who thought of no reward, but met your need, Fully and freely? They gave little things, But who shall measure worth of kindly deed? They gave, and you received; no price was set Upon the aid that they extended then— But God keeps reckoning of little things Fail not to pay your score to other men!

Publication Title: Ararat Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WORKING LIKE A DOG. [Newspaper Article] — The Ararat Advertiser — 3 January 1914

WORKING LIKE A DOG. You've heard people say that they have "worked like a dog all day." An exchange has figured that, if this were literally true, the 24 hours would be spent thus:-One hour dig- ging out a rat, two hours knawing a bone, one hour waiting for a cat to come down from a tree, half an hour begging to get in the house, and the balance of the time sleeping on a mat in the cold doorway.

Publication Title: Ararat Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
POOR SOILS—THEIR CULTIVATION. [Newspaper Article] — The Ararat Advertiser — 3 January 1914

POOR SOILS-THEIR CULTIVATION. The modern scientific agriculturist does not admit that there can be other than temporarily such a thing as a sterile or exhausted soil under aver- age conditions of rainfall. The ab- sence of crop-producing capacity of a soil is due to the short supply or lack of one or more of the essential ele- ments of fertility, which deficiency prevents the soil from supplying a complete solution of plant food in well-balanced proportions to a useful crop. Until such soils receive the pro- per restorative treatment, they are classed as barren soils; but only be- cause no serious and rational effort has been made to bring them into the class of useful and fertile soils. Lime in suflicient dressings is what these lands require, as already indicated with, of course, proper drainage where the land is swampy, marshy, or too damp. Fallowing the liming, the turn- ing-in of a leguminous crop should be accompanied by an application of su- perphosphate, at the rate of from ...

Publication Title: Ararat Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Awkwardly Put. [Newspaper Article] — The Ararat Advertiser — 3 January 1914

Awkwardly Put.   A nephew's reply to the aunt who had sent him a bottle of cherries in brandy was as follows.-"My dear Aunt,-A thousand thanks for your kind gift. I appreciate the cherries immensely, not so much for them- selves as for the spirit in which they are sent.-Your affectionate Nephew." "What's that you have in your hand?" asked Mrs. Parker of her hus- band, as he brought home a roll of manuscript. "Brains, my dear," retorted Mr. Par- ker pompously. "Are you surprised at the fact?" "Not in the least," she replied. "I knew you didn't carry them in your head." "Did you ever hear the story of the dirty window?" "No; I don't think I did."   "I guess I won't tell it to you." "Why not?" "You wouldn't be able to see through it." Don't get into a habit of thinking so much of your own merits and at- tainments that you are blind to those of others. Never save up your best manners for special occasions.. The oftener they are used the more polished they will ...

Publication Title: Ararat Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOW WOMEN LOSE HEALTH. [Newspaper Article] — The Ararat Advertiser — 3 January 1914

HOW WOMEN LOSE HEALTH. Said a physician:--"l wonder that women fail to appreciate how much nervous force as well as physical strength they consume in worrying over the little things of life. Look at the mother and housewife as she goes about her tasks, and observe how often she utters an impatient exclam- ation, how often she starts nervous- ly at a noise from one of the children. And each time that she loses control over herself, her nerves, her temper, she loses just a little nervous force, just a little physical well-being, and moves a fraction of an inch farther on in the path that leads to pre- mature old age and to invalidism."

Publication Title: Ararat Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE HOUSEKEEPER'S OUNCE. [Newspaper Article] — The Ararat Advertiser — 3 January 1914

THE HOUSEKEEPER'S OUNCE. An ounce of granulated sugar equals two level teaspoonfuls. An ounce of flour, four level tablespoonfuls. An ounce of butter, two level teaspoon- fuls. An ounce of ground coffee, five level tablespoonfuls. An ounce of thyme, eight level tablespoonfuls. An ounce of pepper, four level tablespoon- fuls. An ounce of salt, two level tablespoonfuls. An ounce of mus- tard, four level tablespoonfuls. An ounce of chopped suet, a fourth of a cupful. An ounce of olive oil, two tablespoonfuls.

Publication Title: Ararat Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOW I MANAGED MY MOTHER-IN-LAW. [Newspaper Article] — The Ararat Advertiser — 3 January 1914

HOW I MANAGED MY MOTHER-IN LAW.     By a Lady Reader. George was an only son, and con-   sequently nothing was ever quite good enough for him in his mother's opin- ion. When he and I got engaged she was civil enough to me, because she   thought if her George could see any-   thing in me I must be a bit out of the ordinary, but at the same time no   girl could be really quite worthy of George.   I didn't worry much, because sweet-   hearts always have to put up with a little criticising from one another's relations. When we were married, though, it got rather irksome after a time.           George thought as much of his   mother as she did of him; he was al- ways telling me how well she did this and that, what beautiful puddings she   made, how wonderfully tidy she kept   the hou...

Publication Title: Ararat Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WOMEN WHO BOSS. [Newspaper Article] — The Ararat Advertiser — 3 January 1914

WOMEN WHO BOSS. Woman has every right to be inde- pendent, but the moment she becomes "bossy' she loses her charm. A woman's strongest weapon is gentleness, and the wise woman knows it. The average man can be led, but he is very apt to baulk when driven. If you must have your own way, get it by gentle, not by sledge-hammer methods. No man likes to feel that he is a cypher in his own house. Woman has her own domain, and it is quite right that she should be the queen of it, but when she also wants to be king, prime minister, and entire cabinet, she is over-stepping her bounds. There is nothing very lovable about the woman who always wants to lead in everything. You don't feel like putting your arm about her or giving her a loving little pat every time you pass her. And as for telling her your secrets, you never dream of that. She will give you advice ad libitum; and, what's, more, she will insist that you take it, which is very tiresome. We often ask for advice which we have no idea o...

Publication Title: Ararat Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
On the Sick List. [Newspaper Article] — The Ararat Advertiser — 6 January 1914

On the Sick List. Jack: I don't feel right, somehow. Ship's Surgeon: Don't you sleep wellt Jack: Yes, sir; I sleep like a dor mouse. Ship's Surgeon: Eat well? Jack: Eat like a pig, sir. Ship's Surgeon: Take much liquid? Jack: Yes, sir; drink like a fslabh. Ship's Surgeon: Do you feel weak: Jack: No, sir; I feel as strong as a horse: Ship's Surgeon: Are your eyes dim: Jack: No, sir; I can see like an eagle. Ship's Surgeon: You'd better wai' until we are in port and then go an( see a veterinary surgeon, my man.

Publication Title: Ararat Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Caution to Fat Men. [Newspaper Article] — The Ararat Advertiser — 6 January 1914

A Caution to Fat Men. .The, late. American commander, General. Shiafter, 'althou h a mani" of corpulence, had a deep dislike to fat soldiers. . "'They're no use!" he would .bluster in his. tremendous basso, "They pant, they wheeze, they snort, they chol:e. they grunt, they. groan, they waddle. they slouch through the world! Not a particle of good on earth, fat soldiers! Would not have one of 'em if I could help it!" "Er-but-er-you would not exact ly call yourself slight, would you. Colonel?" a major once asked Shaftei after one of these outbursts. "Slight? No!" Shatter thundered In reply. "I've been a fat old nnir ance ever since the day I tipped Ih beam at over two hundred pounds, and then I ought to have been court martialled and cashiered for outra geous and malicious adiposity, sir for scandalous corpulence to the pre Indice of military disciplinel"

Publication Title: Ararat Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CRICKET. Railways v. Elmhurst. [Newspaper Article] — The Ararat Advertiser — 6 January 1914

CRICKET. Railways i: Elmhurst: A match was playei at theI Rerea tion Reserve on Saturday afternoon, between 'the `Railways': and Elmhurst Cliibs' teams` a:JThieteani that" repre. sented the -Railways: was a weak one, Baker, Beaumont,!iOlarke, and :Turner being amongst-the. absentees, and their places, had to be. filled by substitutes. Elmhurst went' first to the wicket, and were all..put out.for .the small score of 55 runs:. -The-Railways thought the: task iet them an easy one; biit it turned out a heavy one, and they were all dis-. missed for the miserable score of 44. In the sedndi: inniings, :Elmhurst lost 6 wickets for 94 runs. The following are the scores: ELMHURST.-First Innings.-" Wilson, b Willan ...... G. Moore, c and bh Taylor' . . 3 W. J. Moore, b. Taylor. .......13 G. Griffin; b Willan .. ..0 R. Moore, b Willan .. .. ..0.. Ord, e Blaekie, b Willan 3 Gordon, b Willan... .. 2 Chinn,-b Willan'." ..;. . , 7 Mill, b, Willan. . 0 W..IC.Moore, not out.. ...- . 12 .T. Moore, e, ...

Publication Title: Ararat Advertiser, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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