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Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 428 items from Australian Producer's Home Journal, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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REPARATION OF FOOD FOR THE SICK. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 27 July 1910

PREPARATION OF FOOD FOR THE SICK. In the acute stages of Illness, food is hardly needed at all, and milk is often the only kind of food that can be administered. Directly M:e patient begins to recover, the need of nourishing food is felt, and it is now generally recognised that1 t he preparation and serving of food is of especial importance in cases of sickness. In cookery for invalids, the most common difficulty is to know what nourishment should be given, aud in what form it will be most acceptable, to the patient. Fond must be varied but nothing must l-° used that can be regarded as indigestible. The physician iu attendance should al ways I'-e consulted before making any change in' diet, and his directions should he accurately carried out. Much unnecessary suffering, and ? even death, has resulted from pa tients being permitted to Indulge in forbidden foods. The first essential in invalid cookery as in all cookery, is absolute cleanliness. Where pos sible to do so it is wise to u...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FARMERS' CALENDAR FOR AUGUST. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 27 July 1910

FARMERS' CALENDAR FOR AUGUST. (Compiled by the Department of Agriculture from information sup plied by experts, mostly nt the Ex perimental Farms and published as a bulletin.) NOHTH COA8T-R1CUMOND-TWKED SECTION. - 'rops to Sow. — Oats : Sow for green fodder. Barley: Sow for green fodder. Rye: Sow for green fodder. Potatoes: Plant out on small scale. Mangolds:: Sow in deeply-worked soil. Maize: Sow in well-l.Tepared land. Grass-seed : Sow all kinds except prairie, which does better iu autumn. Arrowroot tubers may be set out. Sweet Pota toes : Rooted cuttings may be set out. j Artichokes : Tubers may be set out. Vegetables. — Sow cabbage, cauli flower, endive,, kohl-rabi, lettuce, pai-sley, garden swedes, turnips, red beets, carrots. Where situation is warm and sheltered, tomatoes may be set' out; also French beans. Cu cumber seedlings should be raised under shelter for setting out at first, opportunity. Chokos may be planted near a fence or other support. (Jet land ready for: Maize, ...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PRESERVATION OF FOODS. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 27 July 1910

PRESERVATION OF FOODS. In buying, preserved foods, the brand should he always noticed, and the name of a reliable firm Insisted on. The preservation of foods has . given various opportunities for their adulteration, and, although strictly prohibited by law, many injurious chemicals are added to the ford. Borax, boric acid, salicylic acid^ sulphuric acid and various colouring matters are among the most ordinarv drugs found in preserved foods, and all of them are exceedingly harmful. TINNED KOOnfi. j Should never be bought if the tin show the least sign of bulging, jis that, is as lire sign that the contents of the tin are putrefying. Directly a tin is opened, the whole of the coii tents should ire emptied, and if too much for immediate use, any re maining should be kept iu a cool dry place. If there is any cause- to doubt the quality of preserved foods they should he rejected, as most harmful results niny follow their consumption.— From Rankin's Ha,nd 'nook of Domestic Science, 1/2 p...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AGRICULTURE. THE ORCHARD. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 27 July 1910

^oooooj .AdRieULTURE. -. ^###% THE ORCHARD. (For the .Producers' Journal.) There never was a time- more. suit- able or more promising to speculate iij a planting of trees. The weather wJtli good rains in most purls of the State and every prospect of more to follow, could not be more congenial for this work. Iu deciding to plant do not hurry, but think well before Jinnd, as this is work that 'should last lor a long time and errors will be ntaring at us Cor year after year afterwards — ami it is decidedly un pleasant to look upon ones own fail ures. The soil need not necessarily be rich for fruit tree growing. Any ordinary soil will do provided It is well worked on land of fairly good depth ami open subsoil ploughing or digging will answer our purpose; Khoukl the soil, however, be stiff, a trenching is advisable and draining necessary; to ensure success culti vate ground deeply and if i-ossible \d iibout same depth as the hole will no required for trees, Bay 15 to IS inches will do in...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SHEEP NOTES. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 27 July 1910

SHEEP NOTES. Push the lambs for market. Good condition counts very materi ally with oarly lambs. Sheep return more fertility to the soil than any other animal. It is a mistake to market unfinish ed Iambs. Tho best quality of mutton is never found under n heavy, thick fleece. Never sell yvmr best ewes and Iambs, if you have any care for tho future of the flock. Sheep require a variety of food, if you would have them grow rapid ly- As a general rule, sheep possess a more regular period of gestation than the larger animals. Much of the -disease than sheer; are heir to comes fnoin improper feeding and lack of care in winter. Beyond tho first ewes a marked determination in the fleece is the re sult if I ho crossing is continued. Fee/1 often, food wo] I, but do not overfeed, should bo the rule with lambs. So far a3 condition will allow, do int pasture sheep with other stock. Keep them to themselves. One great advantage with sheep is thjat they remove nothing from the land and do not impov...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE NECESSITY FOR SALT FOR SHEEP. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 27 July 1910

THE NECESSITY FOR SALT FOR SHEKLV (From Hawkesworth's 'Slieop and Wool.') Tho value of salt for slieop is not altogether studied by many wool growers as it should be, and the par ticulars of an experiment conduct ed in France will give cho-ap and ready instruction. There were three lots of sheep fed on hay, .straw, potatoes, and beans for 124 days. One lot had no salt, 1 loh \nz (vn/'li rlnv nurl him rvt.lior 2oz. each daily. Those that had $oz. I gained 4JIbs. more than those that had no salt, and 1 Jibs, more than thow which had loss. Tho sheep liaving had salt, cut ljlbs. more wool, i and a better fiewe than those that had no salt, and showed better results in both quality and texture in tho wool. Many sheep-owners, and especi ally owners of small flocks, hesitate to pay the small additional price re quired to purchase a pure-bred sire, but if they would stop l'i consider the matter a little] carefully they would not hesitate to make the ad ditional investment. There is a very co...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 27 July 1910

193 SUSSEX STREET, SYDNEY All Molasses sold are guaranteed to contain 60 p.o. Sugar FARMERS, DAIRYMEN, SQUATTERS, SHOW EXHIBITORS and PASTORALISTS cannot do better than write to us for Quotations— in 'largo or small quantities. Delivered F.O.B. or F.O.R. Sydney within twenty -four hours of order. NOTE OUR AODRESS, as we have no conneotion with any other ! firm. References from any of the leading firms of Sussex St.

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOT AIR ENGINES. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 27 July 1910

HOT AIR ENGINES. 'How do you supply jour place with water?'' was a question put to a well-to-do settler, a recent visitor to Sydney. 'I have the creek dam med within a hundred yards of my house; it is a deep hole that ban never given out,' even in drought.' 'Yes,' was the reply, 'but how do you bring water to the homestead?' 'Oli, I have a Rider-Ericsson engiiit* which pumps it into n tank near the house.' 'You find the Rider-Ericsson a goou tiling men; les, i uo, ami ? don't mind saying so. I have fried' a good many ways, hauled the water up from the dam in a cask, hand pumped it with a somi-rotary, and then I got a Rider-Ericsson pump. I saw thpse hot air engines advertis ed in 'The Stock .?Journal' a good many years, and I am satisfied with my lot.' The above report from a user of one of these well-known engines speaks for itself. The Rider and Ericsson Hot Air Pumping Engines have been largely used for the last 12 or 14 years, and have made an ex cellent name for themselves, T^h...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ABOUT POULTRY. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 27 July 1910

ABOUT POULTRY. If you keep fowls to look at there may be nothing wrong iu allowing them to roost iu trees or on fences in the winter. If you keep hens to lay eggs, this outside roosting busi ness is all wrong; Fowls have been domesticated for hundreds -of years: that is to say, they have had some aort of shelter for a long enough time to build up a modern race. The v uncompromising man tells you ! 'bluntly, 'I believe in following N'a J vture; it is uatural for hens to roost L, | in trees ; let 'em roost.' There are ' ' all sorts of arguments to bring to -' l-ear against the roosting outside ha ' 1 Mr, but one is enough. The thing .) begins with food; it is food that ?'? ?! makes eggs. The hen roosting out - I Hide on a cold night finds a great ' ' demand for a blanket or warm cov ering, .precisely as a man does. The 1 hen cannot don an overcoat, nor can she find a blanket, so her digestive *-- apparatus works at high pressure all ' f night to supply warmth to the out '** Bide surfa...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FROM A CANADIAN JOURNAL. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 27 July 1910

FROM A CANADIAN JOURNAL. Mr. Jas. Grove, King City, Out., . brought to the Review' oflice two S. (.'; W. Leghorn pullet eggs laid by one of his birds nine months old. The eggs measured 0 in. by 7 in. each aud looked like big Minorca eggs. Mr. Taylor, of Langside, in a let ter to Review tells us of an egg laid by oue of -his S. S. B. Minorcas. His letter reads: — 'I don't know whether any of the other readers ever saw anything like it or not. I was gathering the eggs from my hens yesterday aud came across an extra large egg. I thought it was just a double yolk .egg, so, knowing it would be of no use for hatching I decided to have it for luncn, but on opening it I found in one end a yolk as usual, but in place of a yolk in the other end I saw another egg with a semi-hard shell, not a very big egg though, neither very small, and inside of the inside egg was the yolk and white. — Canadian Poultry Review.

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
POULTRY POINTERS. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 27 July 1910

POULTRY POINTERS. Never worry about the colour of the: egg. That is only -shell deep, anyhow. If you propose to breed from pul lets select the be3t-matured of the dock. Do not try to rear a sickly chick There is uo hope of getting a return from it. Oats are a good winter feed for the birds which are doing anything at their nests. A little green ground bone Is amongst the best of encouragers of the busy hen. It is the early bird that gets the worm. Also the early chick brings the good price. Get good pill lets out early. These are the birds which will make' Into the layers. Some air-slackened lime round the yard is a good thing for fine chicks; and for the hens also. The hen which lays in summer will lay in winter if you give her summer conditions. Fowls that are given a few meat scraps are not as likely to develop into feather pullers. When you find in the flock a hen w-ho persistently refuses to work make poultry.*^ her. Do not be ^raid that a little light in the hen-house will kee...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE WORLD OF WOMEN. DON'T WORRY, DEAR. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 27 July 1910

' 'S-'THE 'WORLD' OF' WOMEN. 1 DON'T WOUItY, DEAR. '??'* (By Samuel Menviu.) Dpn't worry, dear; the bleakest years -vrhat clog the forward view, Each thdns to nothing wlien it wars, And we may saunter through, The darkest inomeut never comes, It only looms before; The loss of hope is whnt benumbs, Not trouble at the door. Don't worry, dear; the clouds arc black But with them comes the rain. Ami stifled souls that parch and track May thrill with sap again. TLe burden bear as best we can, And there'll be none to bear; Hard work has never killed a man, But worry did Its share. Don't worry, dear; don't blench, , don't yield, But dare the years to come; Nor give the enemy the field Because he beats his drum. These little woes that hover near Are nothing, though they gall : We know that life Is love, my dear, And life and love are all.

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A FAITHFUL HORSE. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 27 July 1910

A FAITHFUL HORSE. There's a variation cm tho -kig this tune. ftotirks; 'Ilera'd' reports tlio death of 3 resident mined Daniel Ho- . gan at a pltioe near the Native Do£. Ho appears to have shot- himself ;ic eidontally, and nobody witnes-ted 'In; occurrence, but. lutor on thy body was found, with (!--cwiscd's lior.-e. which had turned rouiul. stmidir.g ovor him. Jiiionn-uion \\.i.s cx.i-voyeu w tho polico olliewr -:t Eimgi:i-.iu, who visiti.-d the spot and convoyed the body to Grass Hut. The iktonswl's Jiorst! was placed in Mr. Nowlund's paddock at Grass Hut, and when tho black-tracker wont to catch tho ani mal, after the inquiry, it could not bo found. The tracker picked up tht; animal's tracks, and followed lli'Cit: through four fences, tho din1*? .tion taken being towards the Native hog. FiVenttvaliy tha 110 rv» was standing over tho spot wluiru 3lug:m's dead body v.is discoi'crc-.i. 'The liu&t.rn ted Australian .Medical Guide' can help in oniur^'iuiy cases. .Because sickn...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BY THE WAY. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 27 July 1910

BY THE WAY. Cool the heated horse gradually. Be sure that the colt's feet are kept level by a ras[.' if the wear is uneven. The only way to fotxl a horse is to give it all that it needs. The best way to ruin a horse is to saw on his bit when he gets a little out line. Heavy draft horses are born with an inclination to walk and work it is inherited. .Speed, ciiil ura life, form, stylo, color and size are the attributes which govern the price. The ration f--r a horse in winter ' should bo governed by the amount of work ho is doing. A horse must have exercise when not at work to remain hardy and in the best of health. Breed nothing but a standard horse, but don't breed to any 1 .or.se merely because his standard. While size is certainly all desir able, yet unless combined with qual ity it is prized lightly in road horse. If a small team is doing the same work as a large team, it should have practically the same feed. A _ sound mare with no constitu tional defects is the only one which ...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
APPLES FOR MARKET. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 27 July 1910

Aprils fou market. In (California every stage of vim picking and after-handling of apples, especially Ijhose intended for export, are treated almost as carefully as eggs. Before being packed for the export trade the fruit is stored for about a month so that full opportun itv may be given for the detection before packing of apples attacked bv codlin-inoth or other pests. Such fruit is, of course, discarded. Before packing, the apples are graded for quality and size, there being two grades for quality and three for size. The first grade for quality consists ef fruit that is ab solutely free from blemish of any kind ; the second of slightly blemish ed fruit. In the Watsonvllle district the only grades for size' that are recog nised are — (1) 4i-tler, which con sists of apples of a diameter of from 21 to 2gin.; (2) 4-tier, diameter ? from 2 gin to 3}in; (3) 3J-tier, whfch consists of apples that exceed 31 in in diameter. The four-tier is looked upon to give the best returns, aud is also...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FACTORS ON THE FARM. THE AGE OF A HORSE. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 27 July 1910

FACTORS ON THE FARM. TUB AGE OF A HOUSE. To tell the ago of any horse. Inspect the lower jaw, of course; ? The Mix frout teeth the tnle will tell, And every doubt and fear dispel. Two middle 'nippers' you behold Before the colt in two^ weeks old. Before eight weeks two more will , come ; Eight months the 'corners' cut the gum. I _The outside grooves_will disappear From middle two in just ono year. ; In two years, from the second pair; I In three, the corners, too, are bare. ; At two the middle 'nippers' drop; I At three, the second pair can't stop. ff When four years old the third pair [ goes, i At five a full new set he .shows. r H Deep black spots will pass from ~\ view .'^ ? At six years from the middle two, jfcrfc The second pair at seven years; ire At oight tho si.'ot each 'corner' *L* clears. From middle 'nippers,' upper jaw, At nine the black spots will with draw, The second pair at ten are white; Kleveu finds the 'corners'' light. As time goes on the horsemen know, Tho oval ...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 27 July 1910

i J $ Thousands o( farmers and landholder* '?? 5j have been helped along the road to ,\ ' prosperity, by the aid of RATIONAL i& ; ? MANURING. Yet, there ore Btill * Jt |i many who have not yet awakened to V : the fact of whnt the rijht use of man $ ' '! urea will (!o for them. f~'* Are \on one of the E'.tepingones? If JjSI '-'? so, please write to us about the ques -? k tion of manuring. Let us tell you * WHY the Government uses our man ures on all the Experimental Plots, and WHY so many fanners lmvc buo '!: cecdedliy 'sin;: our manures. A poit f t card will bring you full information. OPPORTUNITY PASSING THE | SLEEPER. | I PATON, BURNS & CO U23 SUSSEX ST. SYDNEY. U High Grade Manure | ? —Manufacturers. — | Works. I ALEXANDRIA. || gARVJ»jggg5!!SEKSSga55^ag!ffl'3- J

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GIRDLING FRUIT TREES. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 27 July 1910

GIRDLING FRUIT TREES. The cincturing of currant vines I lias boon a practice of grape grow- ! ers, who found the cutting i-f a ring, j or 'ringing' the ?vino with a wire j tended to improve the yield. An j American experimenter has tried j the process on stoned fruit trees. aud he writes: — 'l^tst winter I gird led limbs on several apricot, plum, and poach trees, and in tliL' case of i the Admiral Dewey and Klbertu j with marked s access. Except a few ! scattered peaches the only crop 1 -j-ne on tlntse varieties was on the girdled limbs, the May freeze hav ing caused the fruit to shed. The i Dewey peaches were not only about as large as ordinary Elberla, but ripened about 10 days before the lVw others that remained on the tree. The girdled Elberta limb wsis loaded with fine fruit, larger in size than the average, while there were only three peaches on the un girdlod limbs. The experiment was not so favourable on plums and apricots, the trees seeming to favor the ungirdled limbs, a s...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE HORSE. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 27 July 1910

THE HORSE. Vicious nrrl untajnablo marcs do not produce pedigrees. Give the maros that are suckling colts the best pasturage. A little bran along with the grain will help tho mare that is suckling a colt. An isolated breeder of no matter what strains of horses generally labors at a' disadvantage. Indigestion, loss of flesh and gone ral weakness are often brought on by bad teeth in a horse. While pedigree doea not make the horse, it his considerable weight when his vaiuo is taken into consi deration. The same food that produces a good flow of milk in a oow will j: .reduce a good flow of milk in a mare. Good pasturage is essential if tho brood mare is to produco an abund ance of good milk for her foal, and while grain is necessary if the maro is kept at work she must havo grass wherever an opportunity affords. The penalty for abusing horses is generally paid by those who do it, although they may not know. it. It is the steady gaited liorscs that oovo-3 the greatest -number of miles in...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
EXPERIMENTS IN CLIPPING HORSES. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Producer's Home Journal — 27 July 1910

EXPERIMENTS TN CLUTING HORSES. According to an American author ity: — 'Many teaming linns have tried experiments with their horses along this Hue. One firm in Buffalo, using 500 head, clipped' half of them and loft the other untouched. Those that were clipped did more and bet ter work, held their flesh better on less feed, were less subject to sick ness and in general proved that the clipping was economical, profitable and humane work. Supplying a parallel case among, lmmnn beings- I what man would want to work hard on one of these warm spring days in his heavy wibter underclothes and overcoat, then try to eat and sleep at night with the wet, sweaty garment clinging closely to him? From the view*A-lnt of looks, too-, there Is an advantage. Horses, while shedding their winter hair, can never be made to look even passably well. To maintain the old coat and grow a new one at the same time entails an additional drain on the system, which is obviated when the old coat is removetf with th...

Publication Title: Australian Producer's Home Journal, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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