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Elephind.com contains 7,005 items from Richmond Guardian, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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MUNITIONS OF WAR. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 6 January 1917

MUNITIONS OF WAR A little box of powder and A bottle of perfume jar~ of rouge to counterfeit Sweet one and twenty's bloom A?otion guaranteed .to make The freckles quickly go, A.tube of cream to bleach the As soft aid white .as snow. transformation a~nd a switc The best .of chestnut dyes, bathing suit of lustrous silk Some kohl for the eyes, Were in the trunk that Letty This morning from the stat use beside the sea for man Annual subjugation. Before Paderewski, in his oA talan tour, had boarded the Auckland and was launched vyage back to U.S.A., a young r got him. He questioned the to his impressions of New "nd now," he said, "tell me a the towns you visited in A ipressed you most?" Pad d not hesitate. "Wangarat id. The reporter looked to pised, and then asked, "W Wangaratta ?" "In Victoria," aderewski. "It is a small wn." 'And why did it impr smuch?" pursued the reporte use," answered' Paderewski, te only town in all the tou ey did not tell me to get

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Cotton Growing PROFITABLE AUSTRALIAN CROP. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 6 January 1917

SCotton Growing PROFITABLE AUSTRALIAN CROP. By Da iel Jones in Sydney ' i4n." (Mr. Jones was for years employed as cotton 'expert by the - Queensland GbvernmentL. .N onp has a greater knowledge of this crop, and no one has worked harder to induce farmers to take advantage of the rewards which it offers.) :So serious is the-cotton problem in Lancashire' at the present time that grave concern exists, largely owing to the fact that the'American crop is now more than' Bver drawn upon 'by the factory owners in that country. Lat est statistics show that over half of the-' cotton -now grown in America finds its way to American mills. In a recent issue of the Manchester "Guar dian," Mr. A. J. Hutton, chairman of the B;C.G.A.; expresses the opinion that serious losses must ensue in the Lancashire spinning trade unless the supply of raw cotton-is increased. The day of low-priced cotton has evidently passed, and indications are that this article must for many years main tain a reasonable price...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Silhouettes SKETCHES FROM THE FRENCH FRONT. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 6 January 1917

Silhouettes SKETCHES FROM THE FRENCH St .. -. .* FRONT. .By -Baroness Miarika Stiernstedt, - Swedisrh Author. A Swedish officer once said to me: "'Evidently - it -is. the . artistic and poetic sides of war that render it tol erable, and even sometimes make yot love it!';" And here in Firance the"ar-. tistic sense is largely gratified. The classic red trousers of the French soldier have been changed 'to llue. The troop advaidncs-wvith rhyth mric step, in fine order, buto.Without swagger. The sum of all this blue, the blue from-the uniforms and hel mrets,. forms, during the inarch, a mo? ing line, a w'av Wvhich marks a deli cate profile against the equally blue sky, whose effect it repeats and un derlines. The men's faces- are sun burned and firm from the open air, their brown eyes look forward with conscious valor. I admire this troop, althdugh their uniforms are often faded, their faces illshaven or un-. shaien,-:: often with long black mous taclhes,;:little cared for. An air ofvigo...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
"Let Us Sing" LLOYD GEORGE STIRS HIS LISTENERS. FINEST ORATION OF THE WAR. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 6 January 1917

"Let Us Sing" LLOYD GEORGE ST!RS HIS LISTENERS. FINEST ORATION OF THE WAR. Premier Lloyd George delivered re, cently before a. crowd of 7000 people at the Welsh National Eisteddfod what is conceded to be one of the finest orations yet voiced by any pub lic man in England during the war. Naturally the little Welsh law yer was in great form on his native soil, and his speech is well. worth framing. It is popularly called his "singing address." Just hearken to his eloquent tongue: "Why should we not sing during this war? Why especially should we not sing at this stage of the war? The blinds of Britain are not down yet, nor are they likely to be. The honor of Britain is not dead, her might not broken, her destiny is not ful filled, her ideals are not shattered by her enemies. She is more alive than she ever was. Her Dominions are wider, her influence is deeper, her pur pose is more exalted than ever. Why should her children not sing? I know war means suffering, war means sor row. Darkne...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Hindenburg's Hope THE ENVELOPMENT OF RUMANIA. London. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 6 January 1917

Hirndenburg's Hope TH~E .ENVELOPMENT OF S R.UMANIA. (By jiL. Garvin;,i: nNew -York . "Tribune."V Lozlin. We expect that *by the. ejid' Oc tober the Germans on the Somme will have suffered half a million casu alties and left nearly 100,000 pris6oers in the hands of the Allies. That means progressive defeat on a scale to which Jena was a scuffle, and if the French part in the victory is glori ous, the British share is one of the greatest things in the history of arms. And it is only a beginning. While there is immeasurable exultation at the front, where the sense of assur ed mastery runs like wine through the veins of men, there is immovable quietness at home. Both moods are as they should b, and promise well. But if we in England are not to be betrayed into excitement, no one mistakes what is happening. The Germans in the west are on the ebb. Their retreat has begun. It is slow, gradual, but it is the unmistakable movement. Napoleon's Decline Slow,: When Napoleon turned his back on M...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Richmond A.N.A. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 6 January 1917

Richmond A.N.A. Richmond A.N.A. Ramblers will play Oakleigh catching the 1.55 train at Richmond.

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
False Pretence Tram Stop Should Be Wiped Out.—Open or Closed, They Always "Stop Outside Maples." [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 6 January 1917

False Pretence Tram Stop Should Be Wiped Out.-Open or Closed, They Always "Stop Outside Maples." One thing that the Hawthorn Tram way Trust should promptly wipe oun' is the utterly ridiculous false prc tence stop outside Maples' shop i' Swan-street. It appears that Maple paid the Trust a high price for a, vertising on the back of the tra checks, !"This car stops at Maples. and with the condition attached to the contract that all trams should so stop. The Trust has honored the contract to the letter. Trams coming from the city stop at Lennox-street, move on a few yards and, whether crowded or empty, stop 6utside Maples again. Few people ever get off. If anyone should do so the con ductor is on to them, often chases them, for an extra penny-the pas senger having overridden the section. Going into the city the position is worse. Nobody wants to get off or on, but the tram must stop at Maples. Then it crawls on again over the ex tra 20 yards to Lennox-street. It happens at all hours, fr...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 6 January 1917

E T2HEM SOMETHING THEY UANNOT Y. (ELSEWHERE) .w always keeps memory green. . i*'. _~WaPAOUR NEWEST! KS OF ART. OR N S! "MY FLAG AND CROSS." ;: ourne in general, Miniatures from any i- now know that our photo, complete, with a argements are faithful, gold-cased Pendant, Sole Proprietors in the Sto the original. S5/6 each Commonwealth of the tist cally executed, fram and mounted. They're This item for a short Soldier's Memorial. - Luperior. period only. i. __ ___ ._____ Tho IBternational Take Note of WRITE and we will call. :R ONLY ADDRESS. (. A. . Lnon 'Phone Central 1430 and S(L.A.&H.A.Livingston) we will call; or CALL YOU WANT IT. 434 BRIDGE ROAD yourself. It will interest S ___ (Between Fraser and you. S Hunter Streets) Richmond. 0 0 : e:re , e o ri U gRiao . Of -tli reverse the old problem of PAY to-day and TRUST to-morrow. ::, TRUST you to-day and YOU PAY EVERY WEEK IOTS & SHOES at T per- week er cent Discount if paid within One Month, which is equal to Cash. -a ...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Balmain v. Loyal Rose of Brunswick. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 6 January 1917

) Balmain v. Loyal Rose of Brunswick. Loyal Rose 25 (W. Coleman five for 18, G. Bayliss three for 3). Balmain six for 82 (G. Bayliss 30, J. Hewett 25 not out). To be continued to-day on the Bal main wicket.

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
How Italy Helps "MOST ECONOMIC ARMY." FIGHTING ON £1,000,000 A DAY. A LESSON FOR AUSTRALIA. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 6 January 1917

How italy Helps "MOST ECONOMIC ~ARMY." FIGHTING ON £1,000,000 A DAY. A LESSON FOR AUSTRALIA. Italian railway men worked day and night in the first days of mobilisation and refused extra payment. In Aus tralia transports have been held up and work at the small arms factory and other war establishments impeded by strikes. The secret of how Italy is conduct ing her part of the war on less than £1,000,000 a day is to be found prim arily in the intense patriotism and natural frugality of her people rather than in her economic reorganisation: It will b'e recalled that the railway men who worked day and night to mo bilise the army in the first days of May, 1915, would acept no payment for their extra labor; that in the pre ceding weeks the dockers at Genoa threatened to strike, not for higher wages and shorter hours, but because they feared that the cargoes they ivere unloading might be destined fdo Ger many and Austria. To-day these dock laborers receive £1 a day, but those at Naples, who...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The SEED of EMPIRE Published by Arrangement with Ward, Lock & Co., London & Melb. CHAPTER XLIV. The New London. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 6 January 1917

The SEED of EMPIRE By FRED M. WHITE, Author of "The Day," "The Crimson . .Blind," "The Law of the Land," "The Corner House," etc. Published by Arrangement with Ward, Lock & Co., London & Melb. CHAPTER XLIV. The New London. The favored Musketeers made their way slowly down to the coast in cat tle-trucks and waggons attached to returning mdnition trains. As they went along they picked up. others here and there, until by the time Havre n as reached they numbered something like fifteen hundred alto gether. It mattered nothing that the weather was abominable and that the journey proceeded in a perfect downpour of rain; they were used to all this; the trenches had hardened them against weather of all sorts, and, besides, they were going home. That word would have meant a good deal to many of them in ordinary con ditions; now it had a peculiar signi ficance all its own. And there was not one of them who did not feel that he was earning his holiday. There were some amongst t...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
UNDER THE UNION ACK[?] [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 6 January 1917

UNDER THE UNION ACK Richmond casualties since our last   issue include:--   Killed. P'rivate E. A. Clark. Missing. Privates R. R. Laidler and J. Newton. Wounded. Privates J. G. Fyfe, A. G. Hughes and J. Henry. Seriously ill. Sapper A. Kelly, Private A. I.. Nelson. Adding to their fine war record, the Yarra Borderers can now claim two     more Military Cross holders amongst their officers. News has just been   received that this distinction has   been won by Major A. R . L. Wilt- shire and Captain L. L. O Pedler, who prior to the war were engaged in     teaching the young idea how to shoot at the Gipps-street drill hall. C'ap- tain I. P. Stewart, also of the Bor- derers, received the Military Cross       Gallipoli. Interesting sights seen in France are described by Cyril Turner in letters to his mother, Mrs. B. Tur-   ner, of Rowe...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
War's Effect Seen in Empty Houses and Falling Ropulation—Richmond Loses 613 Residents in Year. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 6 January 1917

War's Effect Seen in Empty Houses and Falling Population-Richmond Loses 613 Residents in Year. According to the annual report of Mayor Fear, the population of Rich mond is now 41,074-a decrease of 613 on last year's figures. On a special tour of observation the council offi cers noticed 142 empty houses as against only 48 last year. "It is safe to say," declares the Mayor, "that War is the cause of the decrease in popula tion and in the increased number of empty houses."

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TOPICS OF THE WEEK. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 6 January 1917

TOPICS OF THE WEEK. Mayor Fear's Annual Report Is Interesting Memento of Municipal Activities in Second War Year- May Be Had Free on Application at Town Hall. Especially well printed and freely illustrated with a wide selection of local statistics, the annual report of Mayor Fear is a decidedly interesting production. A portrait of Mayor Fear is printed above an excellent repro duction of the town hall, and other pictures include street scenes in Rich mand and happenings of the year. There is a view of the tree reserve, Coppin-street; picturesque nooks in the Barkly Gardens, of pretty Twick enham-crescent, rockery and river gar den. A view of an electric tram in Swan-street, to those who joined in the effort which was at last crowned so successfully, and pictures of the municipal quarries, the destructor and the abattoirs convey some idea of the extent of municipal activities. A group from the boys' classes at the munici pal gymnasium is included, and last, but not least, is shown R...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Young Hec., First Municipal Foal, is Born and Will be Reared in Richmond Park—Council Offered Big Money for Mother and Foal but will Hold On. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 6 January 1917

Young Hec., First Municipal Foal, is Born and Will be Reared in Rich mond Park-Council Offered Big Money for Mother and Foal but will Hold On. The New Year has dawned happily on the unlooked-for, but not less "interesting" event that will in future years be referred to as the beginning of the first municipal stud farm. "Violet," the well set-up young matron who has brought such blushing fame to Richmond Council, is now mother ing her foal in a specially set apart paddock in Richmond Park-and both are doing very well, thank you. The foal is a colt, and, sure enough, he will be known to fame and posterity as-Hector! As soon as Mayor Fear returns from his surf-bathing trip around Big Bondi and Little Coogee it is expected that he will issue invi tations for the christening ceremony. It should be a merry party. Turns out that the happy event was quite unexpected when the council de cided to lure Violet from her rich pasture in the Goulburn Valley and welcome her to the Duke-street stabl...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Family Notices [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 6 January 1917

Births, Marriages and Deaths. BIRTHS. MILLER (nee Lena Knape).-On December 28, at Nurse Hawkins' Pri vate Hospital, Burnley, to Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Miller, a daughter (Joyce Evelyn). Both doing well. SILVER WEDDING. BURGESS-RUDDEN.-On January ?6, 1892, at St. Mary's R.C. Church, by Rev. Father Aylwood, William, fourth son of Mr. and Mrs. F. Burgess, Lin colnshire (Eng.), to May (Minnie), only daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. P. Rudden, of South Melbourne. Pre sent address, "Belchford," Brighton street, Richmond. DEATHS. CLARKE.-On January 4, 1917, at Mayfield (N.S.W.), Joseph (Joe), dearly loved eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Clark, late of Burnley and Tooronga (Vic.). Aged 20 years. BEREAVEMENT NOTICE. Mr. and Mrs. J. Brown desire to express their heartfelt thanks to their many friends for the kind sym pathy extended to them in the loss of their beloved sons, Jim and Col, who laid down their lives for their country in France on November 3, 1916. 11 Corsair St., Richmond.

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WHEN YOUR FOOT GOES TO SLEEP. What is the Cause. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 13 January 1917

WHEN- YOUR FOOT GOES TO SLEEP. What is the Cause. If we.'sit .for some .time with .our legs crossed. our foot "goes to sleep." We are really pressing on the sciatic nerve which supplies nearly all .of the nerves of the leg and foot. The nerve is elastic, and is flattened by pressure just like a rubber hose. The fibres which make up the nerve are sensory, that is to say, .they carry sensations to the brain. Motor nerves carry sensations from the brain to the body. The only ways to stop a nerve carrying sensations are by cutting it or by pressure, which pushes apart the soft nerve matter, which is covered with a sheath, just as the water is pushed apart if you press a hose. When the pressure is on the nerve, messages cannot pass backwards and forwards. If the pressure is released. the nerve matter returns to its place and does its work..

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WHY CATS ARE CRUEL. They Have No Imagination. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 13 January 1917

WHY CATS ARE CRUEL. They Have No Imagination. Have you noticed that a cat never dreams? Only the higher animals are capa ble of dreaming, and that is because they have no imagination. Dogs, who are sympathetic, intelligent, and faithful creatures, very often dream; sometimes they bark and growl in their sleep. It is then that they are probably having nightmare. Cats have no imagination and no sympa thy, which is allied to imagination. They can't help being cruel. They will torture a mouse and torment an innocent bird just because they en joy the sport. Cats have such poorly-developed brains that naturally they have a very limited intelligence. They have no idea that when they are torturing their victims that they are causing them pain. Their brains aren't strong enough to tell them: that. If the brains of felines were more highly developed they would become imaginative and sympathetic, and re fuse to catch any more mice, for many a well-fed cat will wait for hours by a mouse-hole, i...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
"WHO IS MR. SHEEHAN ?" (To the Editor.) [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 13 January 1917

"WHO IS MR. SHEEHAN?" (To the Editor.) Sir,-Under the above heading, in your last issue, appears a letter from "Auld Tam," in which he makes cer tain inquiries regarding myself in col nection with my candidature for the Labor nomination for the Richmond seat in the forthcoming State elec tions. "Auld Tam" is evidently afraid that I am one of a number of persons whom he pleases to describe as opportunists. On this point I can allay "Auld Tam's" fears by telling him that I have been a member of the P.L.C. for 12 years-a period that goes further back than my right to vote at any election, either Federal or State, be cause I had not then reached the age of 21 years. As to mine being a new name and making him suspicious, I am afraid "Auld Tam's" memory is playing tricks with him, or else he has not been paying much attention to the in dustrial side of Labor. I will admit that my efforts on behalf of the po litical side have in past years taken place in electorates where it is not so popu...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TELL-TALE THUMBS. They Give Your Character Away. [Newspaper Article] — Richmond Guardian — 13 January 1917

TELL-TALE THUMBS. They Give Your Character Away. You can tell fairly well .a man's character: by the way he. shakes hands. The straightforward man gives a hearty hand-shake, while that of the man you can't trust is limp and feeble. If you don't feel any thumb pressure when shaking hands with a man, you can almost;be crrtain that he isn't. to be trusted. Small-thumbed people are rather weak-willed and sentimental, but they have artistic gifts, while those with large thumbs have great will power and are essentially practical. A ' badly-shaped thumb denotes brutality, a flat thumb shows a ner vous temperament, while the broad: thumb is a sign of great physical and mental power. The lucky owner of a thumb of uni form thickness will be successful in everything he undertakes, for this *type of thumb denotes refinement, taste anl tact. A thumb carried close to the hand shows caution and an unapproach-. able, unsympathetic and secretive lia ture. A great deal depends on whether the thumb is...

Publication Title: Richmond Guardian
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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