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Elephind.com contains 21,400 items from Rochester Express, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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GEMS OF THOUGHT. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 6 January 1914

GEMS OF THOUGHT. Fear, an up-to-date philosopher 6«11« ns, is the worst kind of slavery. Youth is the period of happiness, but only Age is aware of the fact. tg. He who seeks happiness for itself never finds it. He who tries to live most for himself lives least for himself. Civilisation has not reduced the num ber of crimes and vices; but it has made many of them, more ornamental. Be loving and you will never want for love; be humble and you will never want for guidance. The fact that most of the people who make foois of themselves do so uncon sciously saves the world a great deal of pain. The right hand, which is more sensi tive to tbe touch that the left, is less sensitive than the latter to the effect of heat or cold. Vigilance is in watching opportunity ; tact and dariug in seizing upon oppor tunity ; force and persistence in cvowd ing opportunity to the utmost of possiM« achievement. The weakest living creature, by con centrating his powers on a single ob ject, can accomplish s...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CULTIVATION OF CARROTS. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 6 January 1914

CULTIVATION OF CARROTS. The carrot, which is not grown so extensively as it might be with advan tage, resembles in composition the turnip and mangold, but it is much more concentrated than the former, as it contains from 14 to 20 per cent, of dry nutritive matter against about 10 in the turnip. . It nourishes best in deep loamy soils, not too wet, or the carrots are liable to rot, and not very dry, or the growth of the root is cramped. .The soil must be deeply cultivated to per mit the long-penetrating root full power o;f development. The ground should be well mauured. Half-rotted stable manure, applied in the autumn at the rate of twenty loads to the acre, is a good prepara tion. The requirements of the carrot for a liberal supply of plant food are so great that, in addition to the dung, it can utilise with advantage a supple mentary dressing of readily soluble chemical fertilisers. 'The application of 3cwt. superphosphate, 26 per cent, soluble, and J^owt. of sulphate of pot ash, a...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CONVENIENCES IN FARM HOMES. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 6 January 1914

CONVENIENCES IN FARM HOMES. one of the strongest objections to c.ouhtry life by-those who live in. cities is that the conveniences of the farm home are few, and that the work of the housewife is made a much greater hardship than it is in the cities. This is, as a rule, the case. The ordinary farm home has not t' e labor-lighten ing improvements of the city home. There is no plumbings in the house by which the luxury of the bathroom can be had, no running water, no sew age system, heating is done by stoves instead of furnaces, and the whole plan of the house is to increase the steps of the good housewife rather than to lessen them. Now, this is not as it should be. The farmer and his wife should have as many of the luxuries of life as may be possible, and it is possible to ar range the-house of the farm so that many of the necessities of the city house may be had. Recently equipped farm homes are usually better equip ped than are those of several years ago. This is toy reason that fa...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MORAL REFLECTIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 6 January 1914

MORAL REFLECTIONS. A man's character is the sum of his intentions and his choices. A man of honor never purchases happiness at the expense of another's sorrow. Let us not seek for influence; let us simply seek to do our-duty, and in fluence will inevitably follow. The most insignificant people are the most apt to sneer at others. They are safe from reprisals, and have no hope of rising in their own, esteem but by lowering their neighbors. Conceit loses a man more friends and gains him more enemies tnan any other foible, perhaps vice, in the world. It makes him harsh to his in feriors, and disrespectful to his bet ters. What kills men is discouragement. It is sitting down under trouble that destroys them; it is standing up and mocking trouble that enables them to go through it without harm. Regrets are a waste of time in every possible instance, except one. That one is the instance in which the soul entertains them thoughtfully and humbly until they becomo valu able lessons for the f...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TO APPEAR AND FEEL YOUNG. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 6 January 1914

TO APPEAR AND FEEL YO.UNG. A woman of uncertain "years, who .looked much younger than she was, took' the following rules as her 'guide in maintaining a . youthful-.appear? . ance.: Dress, younger than.-.you are. Never dress older. " Never wear old ladies' clothes, no matter how old you get to be. Forget caps and .wraps and shawls and easy c.hair gowns. Keep your figure "young. You-can not hope to look young if your figure is old. "When you look in the looking-glass, gaze at yourself from the back, not from the front.' If you look old, t.hat is the point of view from which to re alise the fact. Beware of .what Kate Field called the middle-aged figure. It is round in the shoulders and hunched up in the belt line. There is a certain roly poly look about the woman who is older than she ought to be. Take care of your hair. Straggly hair goes with old age. Old people forget to shampoo, and they give up waving their locks. Don't let your .hands get bony. Bony lingers belong to the aged. Ke...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AN IDEAL JAPANESE HUSBAND. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 6 January 1914

, AN IDEAL JAPANESE HUSBAND, j A Toklo review, the "Choukouyo Gousho," has been asking its lady readers for their idea of a husband. Here are the necessary virtues of the paragon placed according to the order of their importance in the eyes of fair Japan:—He must not be a miser; not be too much taken up with his own toilet; be ananly in appearance; ex press himself clearly, avoiding any thing like a hint; be prompt" in deci sion and clever in extricating himself from an awkward position; have an ideal, which may be I'.ft to his own choice; leave the management of the household to his wife; never put his face inside the kitchen; never criti cise his wife's hats or dresses; never make other people the recipients of his confidences; not end by becoming an object of disgust to his -wife; cul tivate the virtue of compassion; not drink heavdly; not 'be fat; not be too jealous.

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AN ENGAGEMENT ORDEAL. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 6 January 1914

AN ENGAGEMENT OEDEAL. I The maimer in which engagements J are announced in Holland is some ■ times very trying to the young persons ; concarned. The young mini has to make his engagement miblic by escort ing his betrothed along the dyke (the High-street of a Dutch village), on a Sunday afternoon. Along this dyke, after church, the young people promenade. The girls, dressed in their Sunday best and with their white starched cans, demurely carry prayer books. The chief change of attire with the boys is .they appear in leather shoes instead of the usual wooden klumpevi. Men and women take the opposite sides of the road—that is provided they J nre unmarried and "unattached." When v man and woman walk, together, it I means that they are either married or i engaged. Tf engaged, the young wo . man has the place of honour, at the i man's right; if they .re married, she takes the second-best )>!ace, at his left. ' A pretty picture they make, these . promenaders, and some of the rosy I fac...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
"Ring Off, Please!" [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 6 January 1914

"Ring Off, Please!" She was a very naughty telephone girl, and she ought to have known •better than put the subscriber on to the wrong number. Nevertheless, she did It. Naturally he thought he was con nected with the local theatre for which he had asked, and, being in a hurry, he promptly asked for a box for two that night. "But we don't have boxes for two!" said a startled voice at the other end of the line. "Isn't that the Frivolity Theatre?" he demanded crossly. "Why, no," was the answer, "This is Graves, the undertaker." He rang oS. To live peacefully in a flat you must have no dog, cat, canary, piano, cor net, flute, gramophone, baby, or curi osity about your neighbors.

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WHAT SOME PKOMISES MEAN. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 6 January 1914

WHAT SOME PKOMISES MEAjN. " I am on the entertainment commit tee,'' said the tired little woman, drop ping into a chair, "and one has only to fill such a position once to be able t< understand the position. ^ ''I've been calling on people whom we want to help us. Miss Lee has promised to play our accompaniments, and I can chop all anxiety about that matter, for I know that she will be promptly on hand, will find out what is to be done, and will carry through all that she has undertaken. Mrs. Brown also has pro raised, just as cordially, to give us a l oading, but in her case that means if nothing more tempting offers, and she doesn't change her mind, she will keep her engagement. I shall be uneasy and in dread of disappointment until the last moment. " Mr. Gates is another of the same : sort. He has agreed to train a boy:'' chorus, but somebody else mil need to hunt up the boys, remind him of every meeting, and wait a half-hour for him at each rehearsal. In short, he will...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
RENEWING OLD FRUIT TREES. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 6 January 1914

^ I RENEWING OLD FRUIT TREES. I When fruit trees become stunted and diseased either by old age, bad soils, or unskilful management, they should be headed down or otherwise renovated, or else cleared out and young ones planted in their stead. Most trees may be renewed by head ing down, which is the simplest mode —indeed, all trees, excepting the peach, nectarine, and cherry, will be much improved by being headed down on their showing aymptoms of decay on their showing symptoms of decay tion the whole of the head or bran ches of the tree should be cut off in a careful manner, with a saw if their branches be large, and with a knife if not of large dimensions. If the saw is used, smooth the wound over with a sharp knife, and make the cut in a slanting direction for the pur pose of allowing the water to run off freely.

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PRUNING CITRUS TREES. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 6 January 1914

PRUNING CITRUS TREES. Many people differ considerably in their opinions as to the proper way in which citrus trees should be pruned. The majority persist in the belief that these trees require only to be thinned out and have the dead wood removed. Much depends upon the construction placed upon such statements. If, as is generally the case, such an expres sion conveys the idea of merely cut ting out the dead wood and thinning parts of the tree where the foliage is very dense, it does not go far enough. An orange tree bears the greater part of its crop on the outside branches, and while plenty of light and air are needed in the interior of the trees, this does not imply a neces sity for hollowing it out, so as to leave the main inside branches de void of foliage. Nevertheless, it is necessary that much of the inside growth should be removed, so that what is allowed to remain will be well spaced and well lighted, other wise it will become starved and barren, making it useless, and an u...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE BURGLAR'S BRIDE. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 6 January 1914

THE BURGLAR'S BRIDE. By H. Carstairs. Gransbury Dramatic Society were rehearsing "A Double Destiny." I They were not the usual crude ama teurs. Gransbury is a garrison town, j The military officers can always fur nish dramatic talent. "A Double. Destiny" has only one ad- | vantage from the amateur point of view. The two principals monopolise the stage. But the circumstance was tolerable when Marion Willard and Fred Belson were the principals. Marion was the prettiest girl in Gransbury. That stifled male critic ism. She was also the cleverest ac tress for miles around. That stifled female criticism. Fred Belson, the leading man, held his position modestly. He had a num ber of strong love passages with Miss Willard. To-night he had done well. There was every prospect of a dis tinct success at the two public per formances. The rehearsal was over, discipline had relaxed. A waltz was being bang ed on the piano; laughter was echo ing, the stage carpenters were busy. Fred Belson was helpin...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE MAGNET. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 6 January 1914

the magnet. Bv William Freeman, in the "Sketch." Super's Alley is not an inviting thoroughfare. I£ you take one of the turnings leading from Shore ; eii Hish-street, you may eventually :, d it. but you enter it at your own :r is, in Short, an unsavory cul M=':: ,. 'v;tl, a still more unsavory re -rh.-re is a beetle-browned ; 'he corner, and a sec o: sorts at the further %r the rest, its dilapidated I writer as miscellaneous an : ::anmeni of criminals as one is {0 8l)d in the Metropolis. ""'fere "lcci'leut brought Foster to the the rumor that Brinstein, of ^ ^cord-hand shop, had a couple of rij-iese ivories worth the risk of se r!'rins. Til(M'° are few places int0 iv!,;,a> •,he anient collector will not pmiVtra-.f. but Foster was wishing |-. iiy that ho had remained at home iffoi'0 the end of the Alley was •varix'il. The ivories proved to be for :■<-ri.-.-- and poor forgeries at that, and ;'rastein proved himself to be a re ceiver of a particular sinister and Palivpe.g ...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
READING FOR GIRLS. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 6 January 1914

READING FOR GIRLS. I Indiscriminate reading is one of the evils of the day among young people. • Girls especially used to be kept under ) the strictest surveillance. An old fash i ioned maiden would never dream of commencing any book without first | asking her mother's permission. We have changed all that, however, nowa I days, and up-to-date young women I read everything, see everything and I know everything, while the austere in nocence which used to be so greatly prized is now voted in society as slow and uninteresting. This state of af fairs is not easy '.,0 remedy. Although' J the bloom is necessarily brushed off , the peach by inodurn laxness in open ly commenting upon the strange views ' of life, religion, and morals, taught I by the literature of the period, and by publicity given to the .mysteries and ' tragedies of the great city, it is a won • der that the younger generation are so i little affected, as a whole, by thus eat j ing of the fruit of the " tree of know i ledge...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Senses. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 6 January 1914

The Senses. Everyone capable of rational thought is aware that the human senses are limited in power. The li mitation is in two directions; the one is concerned with the least, and the other with the greatest stimulus which the mind can appreciate. Between these two extremes we find that which is technically teimed the "range of ap preciation." There may be a natural limitation in appreciative brain power. But the limits obtaining in everyday life are set by the sense organs outside the brain. Some of these have their power increased very largely by appro priate apparatus. Thus it is that tele phone and microphone, telescope and microscope, make us acquainted with thing beyond our ordinary ken. We may feel grateful to Providence that the sense of pain has also its li mitations. A man blindfolded and burnt with the actual cautery (a heat ed iron) cannot tell the difference be tween, red, white, and black heat. When a limb has been crushed con tinued injury will reach a point when it ...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Weather. A DESTRUCTIVE CYCLONE. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 6 January 1914

The Weather. A DESTRUCTIVE CYCLONE. Last week was ushered in with characteristic Australian Xmas weather of a most pronounced type. On Monday the mercury in the thermometer reached 102.5 degrees, and on Tuesday it reached 104 degrees, a record for this season, while the electrical conditions accompanying made the weather most oppressive. In the afternoon a sharp thunderstorm with rain set and was continued at intervals dur- ing the evening, the heat, combined with the humidity, being almost in- tolerable. Wednesday, though sultry, was an improvement on the previous days, while New Year's Day was most enjoyable and admir- ably adapted for picnics and sports to which the day is so much de- voted. The remainder of the week was pleasant. During the thunder storm on Tuesday a cyclonic dis- turbance visited the country west of Rochester, the vortex passing over Tennyson and Diggora, through which it cut a passage. Trees were   blown down, and in many cases completely uprooted...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
"The Express." (Established 1873.) PUBLISHED TUESDAY AND FRIDAY MORNINGS TUESDAY, JANUARY 5, 1914. ANNO DOMINI, 1914. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 6 January 1914

'Established 1873.) I'UBLISHKO TUESDAY AND FRIO-'-V MORNINfiS TUKSDAY, JANUARY S, 1914. ANNO .DOMINI,. 1914. Father Time may say, with Ten nyson's Brook, "Men may come and meti may go, but I go on forever." The mari h of time is as inexorable as fate and another year has just been added to its long roll of pre decessors. Our old terrestrial j sphere continues to revolve upon | its axis and pursue its annual trips around its orbit, while its huniau inhabitants rim their ephemeral existence till "life's little span is rounded with a sleep." But though human nature, with the veneer off, is very much alike in all ages and climes, it may be claimed that civilization, with the aid of its handmaidens the arts and sciences, has made great strides in late years and has'made attainable to the humblest the comforts ana even luxuries that were denied the high and mighty of a few genera tions ago. "But unfortunately these achievements have not been con fined to the arts of peace, for much of the...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
III. The Laurels, Albury Avenue, Chiswick, June 10, 1911. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 9 January 1914

III. The Laurels, Albury Avenue, Chiswick, June 10, 1911. Dear Mark,—I am wntng to i^iiev. cur engagement and to eay Im uonj for- the attitude 1 adopted towards you yesterday; but 1 think you 11 agree with me that it was only natmal in the supposed circumstances. - i know now who the culprit is, and i feel shamed to the earth. To think that a brother of mine should have 'desUa me »■ suspicion on you! 1 can nevei fo g him, and have told him so. 1^ o-00a of you to act on his behaU and make things right with Hart and Lea but it was more than he de serves. i reel very bitter towards him ior the suffering he has caused me. You will come as usual to-moriow, won't you? 1 shall be waiting. Yours, as ever, HELEN. Mark Tempest, in the eolititude ol his lodgings, read Helens through once, twice, three time , at the third perusal flung it impa tiently aside and fell into troubled "why*'did the letter not thrill him 'as a love-letter from the writer would have done a week ago? Why did it arouse ...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FARM AND DAIRY NOTES. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 9 January 1914

FARM AND DAIRY NOTES. The legumes—lucerne, clover, cow peas, field peas, soy beans, etc.—may be used for silage, but are not as de sirable as com and the sorghums. Tliey serve an excellent purpose when mixed with maize or sorghums. Where there is an abundance of other crops for the silo the legumes are best used as hay. The best maize silage, pound for pound, is made from maize that will mature a good crop 1 of ears. Immature feed of any kind f is not as good as mature feed. Milk is a perfect medium for bac teria development, but immediate cooling and maintenance of a low temperature will prevent the growth ! of bacteria ill such numbers as will injure its keeping qualities and fitness for use. ) As a preventative for ticks the "Breeders' Gazette" recommends a i large spoonful of sulphur, added to a little more than a pint of salt, and thoroughly mixed. The sheep may not like it at first, but soon come to eat it, and begin to show signs of im provement. For pigs affected with lice p...

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FOR THE FARMER. HOUSING POULTRY. [Newspaper Article] — Rochester Express — 9 January 1914

FOE THE FARMER. HOUSING POULTRY. if all poultry liouses of the closed in type had an end or one side of them knocked out, disease would dim inish by one-half, and the proiits from" the birds compelled to roost in them would, probably, be doubled. It is impossible to conceive anything more insanitary and conducive to disease than the ordinary type of fowlhouse one sees in the country. It is cramp ed, dark and without any ventilation, except the many draughty cracks. It is little wonder that going from the foetid atmosphere into often an un sheltered yard the birds contract colds, and soon become a prey to dis ease. It were far better to let the hens roost in trees. The sleeping quarters of fowls should be merely draught-proof shelters from extremes of weather and, if winter eggs be de sired, they should have dry scratch ing quarters for bad weather. Always have your poultry houses open to the north.

Publication Title: Rochester Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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