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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1893

va The Indian Advocate. Devoted to the Interests of Indian Missions. Vol. V. JULY 1893. No. 3. What the World Owes to the Monks. The story is old but it can boar repe tition, for if the truth be assailed thirty times a day, why may it not be allowed to parry the blows just as often? That so-called free governments should be conspicuous in the exhibition of a rancorous hatred of institutions to which the modern world owes the essen tial features of its civilization, is, in deed, a saddening puzzle, and fur nishes an instructive instance of the ingratitude and inconsistency of tho human heart. We know it often hap pens that men hato with the utmost bitterness thoso who have most be friended them, and that the memory of services rendered us by those wo have learned to dislike, serves to whet tho edge of our aversion, and steels our hoart against those to whom reason alone, apart from the better instincts of our nature, should bind us with the bonds of love. Monks, and monastic institut...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1893

w TEE INDIAN ADVOCATE. caricaturing" and misrepresenting the man of medieval times. The German artist invariably ex hibits him as the finished typo of a bonvivant, gross, sensual and fat, while to-day, some of the most fascinating linos and most musical verses of Scott, represent him in the guise of a Friar Tuckor, M amnion's blithesome Brother John. And it is from these sources that the prevailing impression concern ing the monk of the Middle Ages is received. Yet nothing could not only bo farther from the truth as attested by history, but nothing could more con clusively prove the base ingratitude of the world to a class of men whose serv ices to humanity and civilization have never been equalled and cannot be surpassed. Let us endeavor to correct that my opism which will not let the light of a given period fall full on our mental retina, but endeavors to adjust the image to its own defect. Let us do justice to a remote epoch in human history by viewing its events in the light whi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1893

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 48 blessings were dispensed at the hands of monks and nuns wo have ample testimony from numerous and impartial writers, both Catholic and Protestant. Kenelm Digby, a Catholic, vouches for the fact in that noble monument of his pen Mores Catholici or Ages of Faith, as does Mantland, a Protestant, in his History of the Middle Ages. The perusal of those instructive pages cannot but convince us that Europe would have remained in a condition of semi-barbarism for an indefinite period had not the enlightened zeal, the patient industry, and ardent charity of the medieval monk played their part, and played it well on the stage of the medieval world. And yet the modern world goes on traducing their memory and persecuting their successors, crying out as of old, "Away with them, give us rather the Barrabbas of agnosticism, indifferentism and unbelief." Calk. Rcvicxv. What the Indian Territory Owes to the Monks AS TOLD IJY A NON'-CATHOMC I'KX IN' A NON'-CATHOMC WKUKIA. From...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1893

u THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. last summer and with the furnishings costs about $2,100. The schools are supplied with four teachers and an assistant. About 170 pupils are in attendance, and those leaving this school are qualified for a first-grade certificate. St. Elizabeth's is an institution of which Purcoll may be justly proud and its beneficient influence. in advancing civilization is a God send to the Indian people. Purcell Register, March 30, 1893. To the above brief, yet, comprehen sive review of the successful labors of the Catholic Church in the cause of education and civilization, nothing need be added except, that we may re mark as a case in point, and illustra tive of what has been said about the capacity of the Indian for education and training that the assistant teacher of the above institution is an Indian. Editor Indiaii Advocate. God Heard Her Prayer. The following touching incident was related to me by a missionary. I give it, as far as I can remember, in all its simplicit...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1893

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. tf "Then," she exclaimed, "Oh my God. lot mo die right now." This touching and edifying little scene was enacted in far less time than it takes to describe it. I loft, stepped into the buggy, and was about to start for home when the Irish woman ran out, and throwing up her hands and raising her eyes to Heaven, cried out: "Father! Mrs. K is dead! God rest her blessed soul." The following day, kind neighbors brought her corpse to my parish, eight miles .distant, and a beautiful burial she had, the Indian woman, who was, in every sense, a splendid specimen of her race. She had been physically and morally a strong woman, strong in life strong even in death. She was over G feet in height, and an Indian of the Cherokee tribe. M. M. Fucrslenbetg, 0. S B. To See Ourselves as Others See Us. The Scribes and Pharisees who go down into Mexico and strain their eyes to catch a glimpse of the mote in the Mexican eye, would do well to heed the Master's advice, and first cast th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1893

4.6 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. I i, one hero addressing people, who are supposed to read and understand the Bible as well as himself, in a tone of dogmatism which no Catholic Bishop, no, not oven the Pope, would assume. It is one of the peculiarities of Pro testantism that these religious cranks, whoso ignorance of theology is only equaled by their effrontery, gain so much notoriety. Certain it is that in "benighted" Mexico their occupation would not flourish. You never- find educated Protestant ministers playing the role of these char latans. They are obliged, sometimes, to countenance such proceedings, be cause they are unable to control their congregations; but it is well known that many of them are opposed to such religious circuses. But I have lost sight of my friend Max O'llell del otro lado. Looking a round for notes for his essay on religion, the churches would naturally be upper most in his mind. On inquiry he would bo shown barn-like structures, with an excuse for a steeple at o...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1893

4-7 i fjm. it i IIE INDIAN ADVOCATE. of tho churches of liis country, and road tho story of his redemption. It is there before him in picture-language. How much more fortunate in this re spect is the Catholic Atec than his dusky Protestant neighbor on this side of tho river. The former, from his picture-lesson, takes in at a glance the sum and substance of religion, while the illiterate Protestant laboriously strives to gather up some of the crumbs of religion, which drop from the lips of a "Rev. Bruddef," who strives to spell and thumb through a chapter "ob de Holy Bible." The religion of the mixed races on the other side of the Rio, will certainly bear comparison with that of the six millions dusky Protestants, or even the poor white trash, on this side. Let us hope that we shall hear no more of this female Diogenes going down into Mexico hunting with her lantern for a saint in the midst of sinners. Let her look through the highways and byways of her own land, and report her succe...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1893

4.S THE INDIAN ABVOOATF. lished myself in housokooping I found it expedient for peace sake to let every blessed soul of my large family worship when, and where, and how he pleased. Bacchus is the favorite god of some, while others bow at the shrine of Venus, but cntrc nous, I believe that the greater part of my people worship the almighty dollar. T. M. Words of Love. JJY MAllGAKET TONUY. "Come to me you who labor and are sorely oppressed "With the burden of life and its care; Come and receive both refreshment and rest In the Banquet My Love doth prepare, Hasten to me with your sorrow and sin; Why stay by the wayside so long? Temptations assail you, without and within, Come and eat of the Bread of the strong." Yes, Lord! I come to Thee, weak, sad and weary, The sweetness of life from me oft doth depart, "When nil that is earthly seems empty and dreary; For solace I turn to Thy dear Sacred Heart. Never-failing, the fountain of love most divine Thy adorable heart doth contain; I beseec...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1893

TEE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 4.9 or make us hesitate in walking after Him who bore the Cross," leaving us an example to walk in His footsteps. "Be ye armed with the same thought," says the word of God. "And if any man would be My disciple, let him deny himself, take up his cross daily, and follow Me." The bad example of a few but declares and confirms the holy living of the many faithful and true, in the ministry and religious state, of the Catholic Church. Look not to the examples of the faithless, but to the lives of the true and loyal, mirrored in holiness and chastity. From the stinking weeds and rotting branches, cast over the walls of the Church thrown from the garden of God's Church as unworthy and contaminating, we are invited to turn and admire within the pale of the Church, those thousands, tens of thousands, and hundreds of thousands of both sexes, whose lives present fairest lilies of unsullied chastity, the sweetest flower of a heavenly charity, planted in a consecrated heart, ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1893

50 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Ite Indian Advocate Is a Review, published by the Benedictine Fathers of the Indian Territory, to plead the cause of the last i 'mnants of the Indian tribes, and to give a history of their progrtsi toward civilization. It will contain, from time to time, a general history of each tribe j their progress in education and religion ; their occupa tions, Industries, schools, etc., etc. Also, a history of our mis sions, statistics, and other interesting matter that can not be found in any other publication. The proceeds of this Review will be used for educating and converting the Indians of the Territory. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE, Sacred Heart Post Ofllce, Oklahoma Territory. Ari'ROVED by Right Rev. TIIEO. MEERSCHAERT, Vicar Apostolic of Oklahoma and Indian Teiuutoky. Subscrtpttotis 50 Cents per Year. Single Copies 15 Cents. JULY 1893. Editorial and Local. Tecumseh, our county seat, is erect ing a Catholic house of worship. This striving little town is not quite two yea...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1893

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 51 wiser; who does not magnify tho splinter in her finger into a stick of timber, nor the mote in her neighbor's eye into a beam; who swallows bitter words with out leaving the taste in other people's mouths; who can give up her own way without giving up her ghost; who can have a thorn in her flesh and yet not prick all her friends with it such a one surely carries a passport into the good graces of mankind. As we go to press, preparations are made for the celebration of tho Sacer dotal Silver Jubilee of V. B. J. Thomas Prior of Sacred Heart Monastery. In our next issue we shall D. V. give an account of the event. A NOBLE MAN. One of the many people who deserve the heartfelt thanks of the cyclone sufferers of Cleveland County, is Father Vincent. As soon as this gentleman heard the news upon this fatal night, he immediately went there and spent 24 hours in administering to the in jured and dying. Untiring in his efforts; social in his endeavors to alleviate, and ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1893

l 62 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. presume to erect their own self-conceited stupidity on the pedestal of public opinion would have reasonable men regard them us oracles of truth. They would foist their own folly upon an ignorant and unreflecting audience in preference to the truth of God; they would dethrone virtue to exalt vice; the3r would destro7, reality to supplant it with vacant nothingness; the7 would disturb the perfect consonance of re vealed religion by introducing the jar ring discord of error; they would mar the beautiful unity of a wonderful sys tem of consistent and authoritative teaching by the introduction of their own foolish opinions and incoherent and gratuitous assertions. It is not a difficult thing, nor indeed a rare thing, for the most certain and incontestable facts and truths to be impugned by the malice or ignorance of others. What is more certain than one's own identity, yet it might require a lengthy and costly process to establish it to the satisfaction of one w...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1893

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 53 against which wo must warn you. Thoro can bo no convention between Christ and Belial, no harmony between faith and heresy. It is of the very essence of faith that there should be no hesi tation or doubt in the assent that is given to the whole deposit of revealed truth without excoption. Now every Catholic knows and believes that it is the Catholic Church alone that is the depositary of revealed truth. All other forms of so-called Christian worship are separated from the Catholic Church and dissent from its teaching and prac tices. They reject many of those wholesome doctrines and lifegiving sac raments which Jesus Christ committed to the keeping of His Church, and thus they refuse to submit to that divinely constituted authority, and place them selves outside of the only form of worship that is acceptable to God. What, then, is to be said of the conduct of those Catholics who, under any pretext whatever, take part in heretical worship, by assisting at its re...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1893

u THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. If I Should Die. If I should die to-night, My friends would look upon my quiet face Before they laid it in its resting place, And deem that death had made it almost fair. And laying snow-white flowers against my hair, Would smooth it down with tearful tenderness, And fold my hands with lingering caress, Poor hands, so empty and so cold to-night. If I should die to-night, My friends would call to mind some loving thought, Some kindly deed the icy hand had wrought, Some gentle words the frozen lips had said, Errands on which the willing feet had sped. The memory of my selfishness and pride, My haughty words, should all be set aside, And so I should be loved and mourned to-night. If I should die to-night, E'en hearts estranged would turn once more to me, Recall ing other days remorsefully, The eyes that chill me with averted glance "Would look upon me as of yore perchance, And soften in the old familiar wixy, For, who could war with dumb, unconscious clay? So I m...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1893

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 55 moncomont of the ceremonies proper. After a day spent in grand revelry, the youth sought the homo of his bride and remained in her house until the first cock-crow, when ho hied away to com mence anew the feasting. For three days ho enjoyed good things ad libitum, then on the fourth, in company with several elders, he again sought the bride. In the presence of the ancients the pair partook of food from the same dish, thus signifying their unity. The husband was at liberty to take his wife to his own home. lie contracted no ties with the family of his wife, and not even friendly intercourse was allowed. The parents nor brothers and sisters were permitted to call the name of the husband of daughter or sister. When speaking of him an exclamation equiv alent to oh! was used. The mother-in-law could not even look upon the face of her son-in-law! The distress of some modern households was thus entirely unknown. No law restricted the number of wives, a man could have...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1893

56 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Dances, in honor of the party deceased, were celebrated each evening. The braves decked in glory, and the maidens given the privilege of selecting their bost-likod partners for the dance. Let not any of the young ladies who chance to peruse this article for a moment indulge in imaginings of the maidens floating dreamily through the mazes of the fascinating waltz. Quito a different affair I assure you. The day the food failed a grand "pole pulling" occurred. One of the elders was given the honor of removing the two centre poles and a lad was appointed to each of the outer poles. The procession, headed by the old man and the boys, started from the place of revelry. A kind of solo and chorus was maintained by the elder and the lads, the old gentleman whoop ing and the boys replying all together. Around the poles a fantastic dance was executed; when beginning to weary, the elder whooped loudly and plucking his poles, the boys following suit, the mourning place wa...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1893

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 57 Catholics as thoy commented upon the superstitious credulity of those who recorded and believed it. And yet the groat majority of those who to-day havo read the above statement, and find not the smallest difficulty in giving it their belief, are unwilling to credit the mir aculous occurrences related in history as having been wrought, not for the punishment of a perjurer, but in proof of the divine mission and call of God's appointed servants. It is a remarkable fact, and one which has again and again been forced upon our attention, that the human mind seems to. have no trouble in ascribing to divine interposition the calamaties which overtake the wicked, but is ever doubtful of divine interposition in bo half of the good. And yet the Scrip tures contain many such instances which the so-called "science" of our day laughs to scorn, and attempts to explain away as being the results of natural causes. So, too, the remark able cures effected in answer to prayer; ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1893

58 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. TJc -jZSijgel ofjtirgatory. HOW MANY 8WKET RKMINISCKNCkS THI8 T1TLK RECALLS TO A CHRISTIAN MIND. Why the Souls in Purgatory are Called "Poor Souls." A short time ago a fervent young priest oi this country had the following conversation with a holy bishop on his way to Rome. The bishop said to him: "You make mementos, now and then, for friends of yours that are dead, do you not?" The young priest answered: "Certainly, I do so very often." The bishop rejoined: "So did I when I was a young priest. But one time I was grievously ill. I was given up as about to die. I received Extreme Unction and the Viaticum. It was then that my whole past life with all its failings and all its sins came before mo with startling vividness. I saw how much I had to atone for, and I reflected on how few Masses would be said for me, and how few prayers! Ever since my recovery I have most fervently offered the Holy Sacrifice for the repose of the pious and patient souls in Purgatory, a...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1893

TEE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 59 tho sight of the pitiful state the soul of hor fathor was in, sho molted into tears; she cast herself down at tho loot of her Heavenly Spouse, and begged Him, through His precious Blood, to free hor father from his excruciating suffer ings. She also begged St. Catharine to intercede for him, and then turning to our Lord, she said: "Chargo mo, 0 Lord, with my father's indebtedness to Thy justice. In expiation of it I am ready to take upon myself all the afllic tions Thou art pleased to impose upon mo." Our Lord graciously accepted this act of heroic charity, and released at once hor father's soul from Purga tory. But how heavy the crosses wore, which she, from that time, had to suffer, may be more easily imagined than described. This pious sister seemed to have good reason to believe that her fathcr-'s soul was in Paradise, yet she was mistaken. Alas, how many are there who resemble her? How many arc there, whose hope as to the condition of their deceased frie...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1893

60 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. frages of tho Church until thoy are partly purified by divine justice in Pur gatory. After St. Vincent Ferrer had learned the death of his sister Frances, he at once began to offer up many fervent prayers and works of penance for tho repose of her soul. He also said thirty Masses for her, at the last of which it was revealed to him, that, had it not been for his prayers and good works, the soul of his sister would have suf fered in Purgatory to the end of the world. From these examples you may draw your own conclusions as to the state of your deceased friends and relatives. I Rest assured that the judgments of God are very different from the judgments of men. "My thoughts are not your thoughts," says the Lord, "nor your ways my ways. For as the heavens are exalted above the earth, so are my waj's exalted above your ways, and my thoughts above your thoughts." We know that tho souls of great per fection have been deprived of the bea tific vision of God for havi...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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