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Title: Ranch, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 290 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 17 February 1894

A LARGE POTATO FIELD. 1 lit ris brothers, of North Yakima, will plant 150 acres of their ranch below Zillah, to Burbank potatoes. To do this, they es timate, will require about 1200 sacks of Beed. They will plant in hills, mostly, and use whole potatoes of medium size. Just imagine the pile of spuds that will be har vested there next autumn! At the small average of 350 bushels per acre the crop will amount to 52,500 bushels, or 3,150,000 pounds, 1,575 tons. Loaded on cars at 10 tons per car it will take 157^ cars to trans port the crop to market. That makes a train about one mile and one-third in length. The crop is to be grown for the Sound markets, principally. The greater portiou of the tract was cleared of sagebrush last year, but some of the work has been done the present winter. Without doubt, this will be the largest potato field on the Pa cific slope, and it will have few equals any where. The latest approved machinery for planting, cultivating and harvesting the crop will b...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 17 February 1894

ro YAKIMA REGION AT THE FRONT. Interesting Extracts From a Lettar From Judge J. R. Lewis.—The Yakima and the Santa Ca ra Valleys Con trasted. "I am pleased to note your club's reor ganization as the "Commercial club," aud have no doubt that it will accom plish much for your country. The fact is your noble people do not know what a splendid country they have, located as it is in the heart of the young giant state of Washington, near to the cities of the Sound and on the trunk railroad line east, which passes through a splendid country, inhabited by a most enterpris ing people, and who will be excellpnt customers for all the fruit you can raise for years. "What Yakima county can do in the line of fruit growing is well illustrated by an object lesson in Santa Clara county, Cal ifornia. Fifteen years ago little fruit was grown in this now famed valley; a valley practically extending from Menlo Park south fifty miles to Uilroy, with an aver age width of sa/ twelve miles batween the foot-...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 17 February 1894

POULTRY RANCH. [Our Poultry Kditor is Ilnrry 11. Collier, No. 9. r>o C St.. Tacomn. Address him on all Poultry matters. 1 FOWL PICK-UPS. Never keep eggs long before marketing. Make a reputation foi freßh eggs. Evfry farm should have its piegon cote. Nothing pays better than squabs. Kepp ground oyster shells and bone where your flowls can eat it all at times. Never allow a droopy fowl to run with the flock. Put it by itself until it is cored. An extra dollar or two spent for a su perior breeding bird is money well invested. Tacoma breeders have the fever badly. One of them recently paiil $75 for a pen of five Light Brahmas. One of the best remedies for damp poultry house floors, also an excellent deodorizer, is air-slacked lime. Gas lime is also good. Get a good, well-bred dog, Scotch collie is the best, and keep him with youi flock of fowls. Chicken thieves will not come around where the re is a good watch dog. This is a year of buff breeds, the Stand ard having admitted buff Leg...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 17 February 1894

12 THE SOURCE OF GOOD. Lord, 'tis Thy plenty-dropping hand That soils nuy land, And giv'st me for my bushels sown Twice ten for one ; Thou mak'st my teeming hen to lay Her ecg each day; Besides, my healthful ewes to bear Me twins each year ; The while the conduits of my kiue Run cream for wine. All these and better Thou dost send Me to this end, That I shall render for my part A thankful heart, Which, fired with incense, I resign As wholly Thine. But the acceptance, that must be My Christ, by Thee. —English Rector. WINTER FLOWERS. Fill soft and deep, O winter snow! The sweet azaliii's onken dells, And hide the bank where roses blow, And swing the azure bells. O'erlay the amber violet's leaves, The purple aster's brooksule home, Guard all the flowers hpr pencil gives A life beyond their bloom. And she, when spring comes round again By greening slope and singing flood, Shall wanrler, seeking not in vain Her darlings of tho wood. —Whittier. JEANIE'S LOVE LTTERS. Jeanie Campbell came ba...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 17 February 1894

line of a waistcoat and a needle and thread and posted it at his door as she went out; but she had to come back again, she was so ill, and all day she lay there alonp, waiting for what was the only friendly signal in the world to her, the scrap of paper of the foreign artist. She heard it pushed under the door at last, and feebly rose and groped for it. Her head was throbbing so that she could scarcely see that it contained a whole line of portraits—an elderly man and woman, and younger faces, among which was his own. His family doubtless. She made a rough outline of her hat, with a sharp oval !or a face underneath. She was too ill to get it down to him. She pushed it out and trusted that he would fetch it. She heard him in the morning come up again, and then she heard no more, for the fever seized upon her, and when next she woke to conscious ness she was lying on a hospital bed. For days she was too weak to speak or think, but when she was able, one of the nurses asked her if she ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 17 February 1894

M HOME DEPARTMENT. Electric Lights. It is snid that a poor boy was brought up iv the state of Pennsylvania, in a very shabby house. He used to sit out on the curb stone aiid long for the time to come when lie would be grown, so that be might go to Texas and make a fortune. He grew up, sold the homestead for a more pittance and went away to miike his fortune. Within a year his old home was worth millions of dollars. The very curbstone upon which he sat for many a day wns filled with wealth, but he had never thought of looking at home for it. So in truth, while we look away to some outside help, be it to man or our false ideas of God, we shall never un cover the mino of wealth that lies within our rwn hnms, our inner self. We must look within for that which we wish to briu» forth.— From Universal Truth. I pray ymi with all earnestness to prove and know within your hearts that all things lovely and righteous are possible for those who believe in their possibility and who determine that...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 17 February 1894

To Measure a Room for Wall Paper. To determine the Dumber <>f rolls of pa per to cover the walla of a room, measure the circumference, from which deduct the width of doors nntl windows, and divide the remainder l>y 8. Example—Let us suppose a room 12x10 feet, which has two doors and windows which average 4 feet wide: 12x12x10x16=66, circumference. 4x1=46, doors and windows. 8)40 15% or say 11 rolls. This rule is calculated for a room of not less than 10 nor more than 12 feet in height. For a room under 10 feet high, having a freize, say of G inches, we will proceed as before with the measurement of the room, deducting thn width of doors and windows. But in this case multiply the re mainder by 2 and divide by IS; for this rea son, that we can cut 5 lengths out of a double r-ill, which, placed side by side on the wall, cover a space 7 feet 0 inches from the ceiling, and instead of multiply lug by 7 feet 6 inches, we multiply both by 2. Example—lake a room 14x14, with two door...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 17 February 1894

16 Prosser Falls Irrigated Lands. Ist. There is, on account of the great growth of the country tributary to Prosser Falls, a demand fora distributing point. It is the outfitting point for tin- great Sunnyside country, that is now being irrigated by the X. P. Co., of which Paul Schulze is president This canal is 60 miles long, of Which 4? miles are now completed. This canal is 30 feet wide on the bottom and carries 650 cubic feet of water per tecoud of time. When fully com ple'ed it will Irrigate 70.010 ncres of laud. 2d. Prosser Kails is the starting point of the great Yakima and Columbia system of canals that will irrigate 75,030 acres, throwing open to settlement a magnificent country This canal is partially completed and work is being done at the present time. 3d. Proaser Falls is the outfitting point for the great Korse Heaven wheat district, comprising 400,000 acres, of which only 10,003 are now cultivated, but later will support many thousand people. . ... 4th. I'rossiT Falls ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 24 February 1894

THE RANCH ONE DOLLAR A YEAR. WEEKLY. A Journal of The Land and The Home in The New West. VOL. I. NO. 6. Prospects. War! War! War! War was declared at Spokane against all the hosts of the under world that come upon us in count less legions, robbing us of home comforts, stealing away our bread, purloining our interest and mortgage money and the principal itself. The fruit growers rallied at Spokane last week, coming tens and hundreds of miles to organize against the common foe—the Insect Pests that are costing America millions upon millions of dollars every year. The war is on, gentlemen. The enemy's advance guard has already got inside your barriers. If you would save your orchards from the fate of those in the east, you must beat back these invaders that steal upon you as secretly as disease and death. They are Disease and Death to the greatest material interests in this great North west. # :■-/-• General In Sect commands a bigger army than the numbers of all other sects combined. H...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 24 February 1894

2 must be self sustaining. Otherwise it will f.-.il when (he prop is removed. It is our belief that if beets in sufficient quan tity and rich in sugar can be grown here capital will come to work them up, bounty or no bounty. Let's be ready for such a thing anyway. * * # Walla Walla people are jubilant over their fruit prospects for next full. It's a little too early to crow, some may say, but there is little danger of an adverse turn in the outlook. The trees are now in splendid order and the soil is moist and cold. It is the "on" year for apples all through thaf region and peach buds are all right. This seems to be the talk all over the eastern Washington. The lust freeze op has dispelled all fear in this particular neit:hborhojd that warm weather might i uluce too early swelling of the fruit buds. Considering the com mercial results promised at Spokane in this connection, who can wonder that the owners of bearing orchards in east ren Washington are in high glee? The very air of th...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 24 February 1894

THE STANDARD FRUIT PACKAGE. The standard sizts of fruit packages adopted by the Northwest Fruit Growers' convention is as follows: Apple b.»xes—lS^xl2 xl 1^ inches. Pear boses — 18^x12 x 8£ inches. Peach bo>es —ISJxIUx 4.\ inches. Prune boxes —lS^xll-^x 4 inches. tJrape crates, holding four packages, 16x Itixl^i inches. All of the above are inside measurements. The ends of the boxes are to be three fourths of au inch thick and made of one piece. The sides and top of the boxes are to be in one pieoe each. The bottom may be in two pieces. CREAM CUPS. The co-operative creamery iv Denmark ia crowding out private dairying and also the creameries owned oy individuals or com panies. The co-operatives fix the standard of Danish butter in foreign marktts, and that standard is a high one. Prof. Ueorgt* am thus enumerates the benefits of the sys tem: These creameries have been tducators ora in addition to being the means of augu uienting their incomes. The common inter est which they ha;l i...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 24 February 1894

\ THE GREAT CONVENTION. Fruit is King.—The Fruit Growers of all The Pacific Northwest in Attendance.— A Splendid Reception. -A Tumi -.g Point in our Industrial History. Spokane will ever remain as a pleasant memory in the lives of from four hundred to five hundred of the most intelligent, earnest, enthusiastic, and progressive men that I ever met in convention. Every one was surprised at the nnmbera present. Much was hoped for, but more was accom plished. The Washington State Board of Horticulture builded better than they knew, and credit is due them in a Urge measure for the result. The press advertised it freely and constantly for weeks in advance. The fruit growers took up the cry nnd came hundreds of miles to gather information and to strengthen their hands by oryaniza ation and co-operation. Spokane men and women caught the enthusiasm, greeted the visitors heartily and welcomed them with a broad hospitality that showed DO stinting or sign of hard times. Spokane's beauti ful and...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 24 February 1894

netted me zero. Small or no returns are usually the fault of the shipper. Eastern buyers acknowledge the high qual ity of our fruit, but say it is poorly packed. My present success is in right grading and packing. Four years ago my orchards were unprofitable; now they bring $1,000 a car load. I only ship first quality fruit, graded in two or three sizes. CTILIZB THE I'OOREK FRUIT. I tried to use the third and fourth grades in cider and vinegar, but failed at that. Now I keep several hun Ired hog*, The refuse fruit is mixed and boiled with refuse potatoes, cabbages and other vegetables, and fed to tin- pigs. In this way it brings about as high a price as tl c better fruits sent to market. Every fruit grower should have ho^s, poultry and bees in plenty. The chicks are profitable as iusect scavengers and as fertilizers; the b es as pollenizers. Spraying the trees poisons very few of the bees. It pays to dry or evaporate the high grade, overripe fruits, and also the best of the third an...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 24 February 1894

6 THE USES OF HONEY. A honey enthusiast thus sums up the merits of his favorite sweet: A free, regular and constant use of honey is probably the best medicine for throat troubles there is. It is a wholesome and economical substitute for butter, being as a rule half the price of that article. Honey is of more service in our cooking than many people imagine. Honey may, indeed, replace sugar as an ingredient in the cooking of food. In rice puddings the writer invariably uses honey instead of sugar; the flavor is much more deli cious. For preserving most kinds of fruit honey is far preferable to sugar, as it has the quality of preserving for a long time in a fresh state anything that may be laid in it or mixed with it, and preventing its corruption in a far superior manner to sugar. For many medical purposes honey is invaluable. To town residents who may be jaded and look care worn after the excitement of late hours, when the skin becomes dry, red and harsh looking, try the effects of r...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 24 February 1894

STOCK ECONOMICS. To grade up a worn out farm put in a herd of dairy cdws. Mutton from a half-fattened sheep cannot be prime. So build up the mutton sidt of sheep farming, and none but the best fitted market. I)o not breed good mares, or any mmes, for that matter, to an inferior stullion. To thus try to save a few dollars is to lose many in the long run. Give tlir brood sous the best of care these days. Change* in weather, frequent and marked, are to be expected, hence the need cf better attention than at other times. Prof. Robertß says he used to feed GOO head of hogs per year, and lie was in that fin observer of results. He says that pure food and cleanliness are essential to the best success, and that in ftcdiu^ hogs the man who feeds them well will succeed with them. The despised ami much reviled nmle out sells the noble hois , taking the states to gether. According to the last census the average pi ice of the mule was $~ greater than the In ree, Oregon in fact is the only state ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 24 February 1894

8 THE RANCH A Weekly Newspaper For Everybody Who Wants It. Price—sl.oo a year, in advance. Worth—Two gold dollars. Conducted by E. 11. Libby. Managing Editor, W. W. Corbktt. EDITORIAL OFFICES: NORTH YAK IMA, WASHINGTON. business offices: North Yakima, cor. Second and Chestnut Sts. Seattle, Room 7. Hincklcy Block. Tacoma. 111«, Pacific Avenue. RANCH SMALL TALK. More from the Spjkane convention in Thk Ranch next week. Its echoe3 will rever berate for many a day and year. The women of Spokane, may (Jod bless them, made the fruit growers' convention an affair of beauty and spirit. Women should always liaTe a place in every horti cultural society and meeting. Miss How ard's paper on Window Gardening will be found on another page. British Columbia sees that her coming great fruit industry should be on a par with that of Washington & Co. Perhaps the Pacific Northwest Fruitgrower*' Associa tion will help her to ome into the only union. We are the people. Miss B Co lumbia really belongs ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 24 February 1894

THE INTERVIEWER. Growing the Potato by Aid of Irrigation —Planting, Cultivating, Harvesting— Varieties— The Sweet Potato, Its Yield, Quality, etc.-Judge J. H. Stout on the Stand. J. M. Stout is a well known experi menter in agricultural and horticultural lines. He brought from California con siderable knowledge of farming by irri gation and has practised it here for many years, giving especial attention to market gardening. The Interviewer tackled him upon the subject of potato growing the other day. This is an important topic •ml in due time the exporience of others will bo solicited, for ideas and methods differ. The b33t is what wj are working for. An 1 right here let it ba said that one idea of these interviews is to call out the practice of other* than the interview ed, to provoke discussion. It a reader has or thinks he has a better way of do injj things than that given by those with whom we talk, he is the man The Ranch desires to hear from, in a brief and pointed manner. But...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 24 February 1894

lo WOMEN AS FARMERS. California boasts of a number of women farmers who manage large estates, make money anil keep healthy and happy. The comforts of farm life here are greater than they are in the east, and there is a possibility of gaining more than a mere living. Some of the women farmers have won more than mere local fame. Mrs. Theodosia Shepherd, of Ventura, is known in the east as a cultivator of California flower seeds and bulbs. Mrs. Strong is known far and w ide as the woman who makes a good income by raiting and sell ing pampas grass, Mm. E. P. Bucking ham. of Vaooaville, is an orchard Ist whose fruit commands the highest price in east ern markets. Another successful agriculturist is Mrs. Gaor.nia Mußride. A dozen years ai^o she was an invalid, a widow, poor, with four boys to brimr up. She kneiv nothintl of fruit raising, but with feminine reckless ness she purchased 38 acres of land near Kan Jose and set it out as an orchard. Now she is prosperous, healthy and wealthy, a...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 24 February 1894

around, in that way saving the nriddle man's commission, and by always taking fre.sh p^sthey never have any trouble in disposing of all they have at a good price. Now the poultry man, in order to make his business a success, should deal only with hones: merchants, and when he finds one palming off shipped ejr^s for fresh, home-raided etr^s, then and the*e lie should find another place to trade and tell the merchant the reason of the change. Of course it cannot be expected that the limited number of people in this business on the coast should furnish all the etrtjs that are used for home consump tion, but by a crusade like that hinted at above the merchants could be prevented from defrauding their custoroen and it would cause the home uroduct to bring better prices. One produce company in Taeoma furn ishes all egg-farmers of whom they buy eggs with a small rubber Stamp. With tliis they stamp all etrys with their names and a guarantee of freshness, and if a customer finds a rotten one...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 24 February 1894

12 OLD HAYSEED'S FIRST LOVE. Why, howdy, Bill! git down an' hitch. For Martha gone ter see Old Sister Gibbs—she's purty sick— I'her's no one here but me; An' Si, he's gone ter singing' skule, Down yonder 'bout er mile; Cum in, an' make yerself at home, Set down an' stay awhile. V'on ast me how I got my wife; I'll tell y*r how it wuz: We fell in love when w'eu wuz young, Jes like two children duz. The more we growed, the more we loved; The older that we'd git, The happier our lives 'onld be, Au' we love like children yet. We of'en talk about the time I n.st her for her han'; Then we wuz young an' green ez gourds; We didn'c onderstao' The little tricks o' Cupid then, The fun at us he poked, While she would set thar sawiu' wood, I'd set thar nearly choked. 1 went thar seven times ter ast, An' every lime I went I thought I'd pop the question then An' get her swtet consent. Somehow I couldn't fix my mouth, My legs would have the shakes; I'd break out in a dead cold sw'et, My In Kits git ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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