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Elephind.com contains 3,232 items from Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 31 January 1894

0 an?, 0 (east of east lias of Indiana); oast em democrats, 2; independent, 1 (Sibley, of Pennsylvania). D movan, of Ohio, and Grady, of New York (Dcmxrate), voted for free silver. The per cent of votes ia as follows: Republican members for gold standard, 91 per cent. Democratic members for gold stand ard, 55 per cent. Populist members for gold standard, 0 Republican members for free coinage at 18 to 1, 9 per cent. Dmocatic members for free coinage at 16 to 1. 45 per cent. Populist members for free coinage at 16 to 1, 100 per cent. In the senate: For repeal Republicans, 26; demo crats, 22; Populists, 0. Against repeal Republicans, 11; dem ocrats, 23; Populists, 3. The final vote which repealed the Sherman law made even a worse show ing against the two old parties in the house than that given above. Oa the contrary, it is with feelings of satisfaction and of pride that we point to the record of the People's party rep resentatives on the same question. This demonstrates conclusively t...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 31 January 1894

10 THE LDVOO-A.TES. Is It Significant? Editor Advocate: The Advocate of January 17 refers to the lynching of three men in Russell county. A few facta concerning this disgrace may not be out of place. The county's political status should be noticed. The repub lican official paper proudly boasts that Russell and Doniphan counties are the banner counties of Kansas because they alone have never elected a single Popu list to county office, but have always been republican strongholds. In 1890 Humphrey had a plurality in this county of 151. Ia 1892 every republican candi date received a majority varying from 211 to 523 votes out of a total of about 1,700 votes cast. In 1893 the republicans elected every county officer by majori ties of from 116 to 490. The God and morality party are in the saddle. Of course they are loud in denunciations of "anarchists" and of lynchinga in southern states. And of course they class the members of the Farmers' Alli ance and the United Order of Anti-Monopoly ...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 31 January 1894

TS2IZ5 .AJDVOQTH!. 11 THE DEAD LIIE. (Continued from pagt 3.) was most of the furniture; and they live now in a little rented house out in the suburbs, where the laboring people live. That was pretty bad; but Hattie became a milliner, and, of course, next time I came home and when I met her in there, I had to cut her. Of course I had to recognize her changed situation. How could I be familiar with a com mon working girl?'' Kate was silent. The terrible ques tion arose in her mind "What if Fanny what if Clarence should learn I have worked out?" But would not Clarence be chivalrous ? Would he act as his sister had acted? Kate would not believe it possible. Some days after the occurrence of this incident, she and Clarence had been walking together down town; and when they had taken a car to go home, Hattie Harbinson entered and sat op posite them, but Clarence seemed obli vious of her presence. When they had left the car and were going up to the house, Kate said: "I feel so sorry for t...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 31 January 1894

12 THUS JUDVOOA.TI2S. BED-EOOZ PRINCIPLES. Senator Sana's Views on ths Existing Evils- Editor Advooatb: The caaoas as signed for the present commercial and industrial stagnation, the lack of em ployment of working men, and the ter rible sufferings of the poor, are almost innumerable. High protection, or fear of reduction of the tariff; too much money, or an in sufficiency of it;travaganceof the work-1 ingmsn and farmers, or a disposition to hoard or pay debts. Some think that capital absorbs too much, and has killed the goose that laid the golden egg, while others claim that capital is afraid, does not earn enough to be em ployed, and ask for measures to concili ate capital. Many think we have too much paternalism, others ask for more. But amorg all this babel of opinions, the sad pathetic, stern facts remain; that ia a country oveflwing with natural resources, inhabited with a pop ulation industrious, intelligent, and wil ling to work; there ia an alarming in crease of enforced idl...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 31 January 1894

TEE333 ADVOOAT22, 10 LOYALTY AND EDUOAHOI Th8 Objects of the Organization, "Ancient Order of Loyal Americans." Attention of the reading public has been attracted to the new organization of the above name, which eeema to be developing considerable strength throughout the country. It follows that the people want to know what the order consists of and what it is for. From literature supplied by the pub lication house at Lansing, Mich., the following information ia gathered: The national headquarters of the order are at Washington, D. C; its hend officer, oalled grand commander, is D. A. Rey nolds, of Michigan. Other national of fleers are: Grand adjutant, C Vincent, of Indiana; grand quartermaster, J. J England, of Michigan; grand chaplain, Rav. Myron Red, of Colorado; grand ensign, S II Piereol, of West Virginia; grand sentinel, W. C Bateman,of Maina Hugo Prey or, of Ohio; A. S. Partridge, of Michigan; Thos. Bosworth, of Indi ana; R. A. Thompson, of Pennsylvania; J. J. Streeter, of Ne...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 31 January 1894

14 THUS ADVO'OA, The Sugar Industry, Special Los Anj?etes (CaL) Letter.'l Sugar-making was one f the earliest Industries of California, and before the Hawaiian article was permitted to come in duty free the sugar cane was looked upon as one of the "growing industries." There were cane fields in the marsh lands and bottoms, where the climate is moist and the land not too rich. The weather being- hot, and frost an unknown quantity, the low lands were uniformly utilized. Each sugar ranch had its primitive mill, something like those used by the ancients. The "industry" was at its height just before the completion of the first transcontinental railroad. This somewhat depressed the industry by bringing in cheaper eastern sugar. Some of these cane-growers were from the south, who had emigrated dur ing the late rebellion, and had brought along their negro slaves. Understanding the raising of cane and cotton, they located on the marsh lands and sought to raise their familiar southern product...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 31 January 1894

TI-II23 JUDVOOTS. The World's lair in 1900. Already the air is' filled with rumors respecting the exposition of 1900, says a Paris letter in the Philadelphia Tel graph. Already are the moans of the Parisians rending the air beforehand, for it is a Parisian peculiarity to detest world's fairs in general, and those held in their own city in particular. Quoth a miserable native in heartrending ac cents: "Whenever there is a great ex hibition all our taxes go up-rtempo-rarily we are told, but never by an ac cident do they go down. I paid three hundred and eighty francs in '77, and for the same premises my taxes are now three thousand and odd. We are overrun by tourists; we are crowd ed out of all the theaters; the cabmen all go on strike; the cafes all put up their prices. For several years before all the streets one wants to go through are closed to the public because the ex hibition is being prepared, and for at least a year after the same streets are closed because the exhibition is ...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 31 January 1894

OP. IN t i y Can be faved fcy Sending for our 1894 catalogue of ID 1 1', (-JirF. I Fl )h and riCVUK MiLt. Drop us a card and get one free. 1 itml b)!, Mrran J lien hted To., Kaa. City, II o. ALFALFA SEED! For mow crop Alfalfa Seed, write to LAHRtftCE RIID. Grdn frlv. Kantst. DfYTAT. fl 8entouttn -rUIH'l r J be V v I ' I r 1 H I U I H I 1 be upront- fS'itjih H I ed on share. No expert-Ujrv(U- enca required. Directions for sprouting free. T. J. HHINNEH, - - O lutnbut, H7if When writing advertisers mention Advocate ARLINGTON HOUSE TO A4 Best $1.00 & day bonne In Kansas. Two blocks tip town from Hanta Fedepot.on 4 th st Electric Headquarters for People's Party men. T. J. PETERS, Proprietor. S(j fS&H" sis I CO s FREEI Pamphlets describing the resources or KANSAS, OKLAHOMA, SUNFLOMER If CUBATOR UMafvtd Flut ImmIoiiI M Kmmw Bui P1p, To fkK. 1-W1. Th. Uul tod mm wnpltta bttebrMri ln.mlri. ffotbiMf Ilk. it I Sm. Manp W cwitefii to T SUNFLOWER flNCUBATOR Co Wb"B wilting a ver lsers me...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 7 February 1894

i VOL. VI, NO. 0. $1.00 X YKA1C TOPEKA, KANSAS, FEBRUARY 7, 1894. OFFICIAL STATE PAPEB. ONCE MORE SILVER DIOI BLASD B0B3 UP WITH A COINAGE BILL A Tarriff Bill With An Income Tax Attachment Passed by the House Washington, February 5. Aa yet no democratic member has broken over party lines on the Hawaiian matter, as far as debate is concerned, and it seems likely the McCreary resolution will pass by practically a strict party vote. Mr. Holman, however, is still bent upon of fering his resolution condemning the aotion of Mr. Stevens, but at the same time reprobating the course of the ad ministration in attempting the restora tion of the deposed queen. How much democratic strength, if any, this resolution will command is still problematical On Wednseday Mr. Bland will call up his bill for the coin age of the silver seigniorsge in th treasury (amounting to over $55,000,000; and that sum to be made immediately available, if necessary, to meet the wants of the treasury by issuance of treas...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 7 February 1894

.2 COPYRIGHT.! By GIDEON LAINB, D.D. This Stoiy was commenced la No. 3, Vol. VI. Back Numbers can be had from this Office CHAPTER VIII. ROBBERY, RESPECTABLE AND OTHER WISE. "The poor weep unheeded, persecuted by every subordinate species of tyranny; and every law which gives others security, be comes an enemy to them." Goldsmith. While Kate is journeying homeward, the reader should be informed of a mis fortune which befell John Cotterell a few days after his return to Graham; a misfortune the consequence of which fell not upon John alone. In 1887 agriculture entered upon that period of depression which yet contin ues and grows worse; and ever since he began work in the railway shops John had been obliged to pay out of his earn ings his father's taxes and the interest of a mortgage on the farm. For the purpose of accumulating funds for these payments he had been keeping a savings account with the City Bank of Graham; and the second week after his visit at 'home, and the next day afte...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 7 February 1894

i'f-IID ADVOOATU. should return, and her mother joined him in his entreaties. "You can't do no good a stayin' here," said her father; "and you don't want to have to lasso a husband or else be a slave in some dod-gasted stuck-up woman's kitchen all your life. Be sides, how much wages out of a hired girl's pay could you spare to keep your mammy and me ? If we lose the place we'd have nobody to fall back on but you and John, Kate; and you'd a blamed sight better be learnin' enough to get a job that would fetch somethm'.thanto be a stayin' round here to listen to mother a complainin'. Can't live that way. You go back to your schoolin'. It may come in good play bye and bye." She yielded, and in September re turned to Haverhill. Clarence was as attentive as before; so it was certain that he had heard nothing of her awful past as yet; but Kate dreaded nevertheless the conse quences of the discovery which she felt certain would come, and she was "dis tant." He begged an explanation which sh...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 7 February 1894

4 i u AIID TOPEKA TEIBTJIJE. OFFICIAL STATE PAPER. XT. JZ. Xs. A. PUBLISH!!) SYXBT WKDSTSDAY BT THE ADVOCATE PUEUSHISiS CTOUY, Booms 43 and 45 Kaox Building, TOPZ3.A. ... KANSAS. $1.00 PER YEAR. ADVEBTISING BATES. For tingle Insertion : Display matter, 20 cents pr lino, it line 10 ine men. wuuw " 43 eenta per lie. Discount tor long-Ume eon raeta. ( lad. Bum! Press Asaoo'n, Chicago Office P. O. VViaurr.Mgr. ( Boyce Building. Entered at the poitofliceat Topeka, Kansas, m second class matter. WEDNE3DAT, FEBRUABY 7, 1834. The National CouEcil of the F. A. and 1 U. is in eesBicn in Topeka this week. Now look out for newspaper lies. This talk of "honest money," in the sense that democrats and repub licans use it, is now regarded as a standing joke. After the Hawaiian muddle is once cleared up Cleveland will have plain sailing with nothing to do but look alter the posteffices. It's a little difficult to understand how they propose to save the country by tinkering the tariff and issuing bon...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 7 February 1894

it would seem proper for the editor of the Capital to revise his statement that "the price of wheat has adjusted itself to the equation of demand and supply." Ho says he is "as anxious to vr$ are to see wheat advance in price." He thinks "it would be a good thing for the farmer and would injure nobody." If he is eincere in this, let him cease to m&Ke every thing bend to the interests of party and endeavor to learn the causes of the decline in prices and the reme dies that might be applied to these disastrous conditions. He innocently asks "if people have been starving for the lack of bread with wheat at 60 cents per bushel, how is it going to be possible for everybody to be fed with wheat at 1. 25 a bushel?" He is too party blind to see that the same causes that have reduced the price of wheat and other food products have like wise deprived millions of willing hands of the opportunity to labor, and thereby rendered it impossible for them to buy bread at any price; and, of course...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 7 February 1894

0 ADVOCATE THIS 13 THE WAY IT MAT BE WOBXED. Mr. Carlisle proposes to sell 5 per cent bonds for the purpose of re plenishing the gold reserve in the United States treasury. There is no law requiring the maintenance of any such reserve, and there is no neces sity for it; bnt since the days when John Sherman was secretary of the treasury, the people have been pay ing interest on bonds sold to put that $100,000,000 in the treasury where it has lain idle, and as useless as though it had never been dng from the bowels of the earth. Since the ad- vent of the Cleveland Carlisle admin istration, this reserve has been drawn upon for the redemption of treasury notes, and the secretary has issued his circular inviting proposals for bonds to make good what has been withdrawn, and to provide against farther demands. That circular says: By virtus of the authority contained in the aot entitled 'An aot to provide for the resumption of speoie payments," approved January 14, 1875, theseoretary hereby...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 7 February 1894

THE PEM3YLVAHIA BIOTS. Did the esteemed Dr. MoLtllin, philo sophical anarchist of the Advocati, notice the fine illustration of "philosophical an archy', in the Pittsburg riots last Saturday? Capital, January SO. We have noticed the dispatches in the daily papers relating to the acts of violence above referred to, and the editorial comments thereon. We have also noticed that these demon strations are everywhere referred to as outbursts of a spirit of anarchy. We have also noticed another thing. We have noticed that these same daily papers, so load in their denun ciations of the "anarchistic" demon strations of laboring men, are as si lent as the tomb concerning the avarice and greed and systematic plunder which have driven these men to desperation, and thereby provoked the violent acts which are so severely condemned. Has the "esteemed" Capital noticed this silence! Are these rioting miners in revolt simply to promote a philosophical idea? Are they seeking simply dis order? Does any...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 7 February 1894

0 CONCERNING KANSAS. TOASTS AND BOASTS. lKo tile Young Statesmen jfinjoyed Life at Their Kansas Day Banquet. uAd astra per asperan was the retro spective and prophetic inscription borne by the banner that floated over the ban quet board arourid which were seated the representative men of the "young crowd" that had gathered at Topeka on Kansas day, January 29. Ad astra per aspera might have nnant up in the clouds without any difficulty, or knocked sky-high and laboring under great diffi culty, or up a tree with the bull dog at the bottom, or there is no difficulty in getting to the top when the bottom ia knocked out. Any one of these free translations would have beet appro priate; it depended altogether on who read it, and in what kind of a light he looked at it. To the ambitious young crowd it meant up in the clouds without any difficult;; to the old crowd it might mean up a tree with a bull dog at the bottom. The banquet was sumptuous, it was all that the highly pampered palate of ...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 7 February 1894

0 THESE PEW LINES. (Continued from page 1.) one man, no matter if that man be the best and the soberest man in the whole country. It ia not good business sense. Yesterday Mr.Carhsle went over to New York, nobody knew he was gone until the snoopy clerk of the Fifth avenue hotel told a meddlesome newspaper man. The dispatch which broke the news of Wash ington's loss and New York's gain, stated that Mr. Carlisle "would net register." The horrible suspicion presented itself that possibly he had gone over to meet Geo. R. Feck. Later dispatches, how ever, revealed the fact that the secretary had only gone on for a "conference with leading New York bankers." Mr. Car lisle did most of the talking at the con fab. The purpose being to reassure the omnipotent persons who had "brought the pressure to bear" for the bond issue that congress would not interfere. Shades of our revolutionary forefathers I Think of the official in whom is vested the discretionary power of this great re public pleadin...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 7 February 1894

10 PEOBLEHSOF GOVE&OHaJT. To be Solved by Wage Earners at the Eal lotBsx- Editor Adaocvtb: Tha anomalous condition of people suffering tor the necessaries of life, in a land of such un bounded resources aa are found in the United States; and the still more appal ling spectacle of human beings starring to death at a time of overproduction and low prices, is surely indicative of an ab normal state, the cause of which is di rectly chargeable to certain false prinoi- ptoi which enter into our economic system. There is food and clothing enough in the country and money enough to buy them, to brisg cheer and comfort to every household in the land. Butun fortunately the money is in the hands of those who do not need our surplus products, and those who de need them are not able to buy them. After having made a careful survey of the field, and having arrived at these conclusions, it would seem to be the duty of statesmen to institute a thorough investigation with a view to determin iog wh...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 7 February 1894

TB233 jfiD'VOOA.TSII. 11 GRANDLY BEDECKED. Suggestion to the Marion's Eeligions Edi tor and Speaker pro tern. We hope the "crowd" that shall constitute the next republican state convention will be simply a big, whooping, enthusiastic crowd of intense republicans determined to redeem this state from the grip of the socialists, anarchists, boodlers and criminals who first humbugged an honest following and have since been disgracing the state in the eyes of the world. Ia suoh a contest there's room for but one "crowd." Let the repub licans of Kansas send their cleanest, ablest, wisest men to the contention filled and thrilled with this one great purpose, re gardless of Tom, Dick or Harry, who want this or that offlae. It will be grandly re deemed if republicans are unselfish. All the combinations possible to be made against us cannot beat us if we are patriotio and wise. We can only beat ourselves. The above article ia taken from Ed Hoch'a Marion Racord, and we have no doubt that El'a ...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The advocate. — 7 February 1894

THUS ADVOO EAED TIHE3 VS. GOOD times. Some Examples of Each That Indicate the Causes of the Former and the Policy Hecessary to Restore the Latter to the Country. Editor Advocate: There are two cchoola of financial thought, or rather action, in this country as in Europe, representing two distinct theories ot money and finance. One ot them holda that the normal condition of the mams is that ot toilers, working for just enough to keep body and soul together and being content therewith. The other in fiiats that it ia the right of labor to thrive and lay up something tor a rainy day and tor old age, and to educate its chil dren. In a word, to elevate itself to a higher plane in society, to a familiarity with books and pictures; and ultimately to become exempted from continuous toil and enjoy the benefits of its early Industry in uninterrupted leisure and repose. The former may be called the hard pan school since they are ever exerting themselves to thrust the la borer and producer down t...

Publication Title: Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Kansas, United States
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