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Title: Cayton's Weekly Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 713 items from Cayton's Weekly, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 29 September 1917

/ / PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. In the interest of equal rights and equal justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the state of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOB CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Office, 513 Paclfio Blk. Telephone Main 24. OUR TYRANNY OVER THE NEGRO (The Literary Digest) Race-riots in East St. Louis afford a lurid background to our efforts to carry justice and idealism to Europe. The ques tion, as it is put by Charles Stelzle, the writer on social subjects from a religious standpoint, is: "How can we assume to free peoples in Europe from tyranny when ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 29 September 1917

THE PASSING THRONG Abraham Lincoln's emancipation act was remembered by the colored citizens of Se attle last Sunday evening in the shape of a goodly number coming out to listen to ad dresses made by some of our well known citizens. The exercises were held at the First A. M. K. church, which was tastefully decorated with flowers and flags, giving the spacious auditorium a most pleasing ap pearance. The selections rendered by the choir of Hie church were very sweet and well worthy of a packed house had there been nothing else on the program. Owing to the absence of the pastor and no one to fill his pulpit on that occasion it was the concensus of opinion that, the emancipation speeches in conjunction with the sacred concert given by the choir, the house would be packed from pit to dome but it was not, and the only reason that this paper can give for it not having been so, was that somebody had tried to have a public meet ing in the interest of the colored folk of the city and they did...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 29 September 1917

H. R. Cayton, the enterprising publisher of Cayton's Weekly, of Seattle, recently issued a highly creditable number of his paper, which he called "The Northwest Prosperity" number. It was printed on a fine quality of book paper profusely illus trated with halftone cuts, and the reading matter of good character. It certainly was a credit to Brother Cayton's ability and enterprise.—Camas Post. George Maney, who is general manager of the Tacoma Benevolent Orphan's Home for Children, will hold a tag day rally in the principle towns of the county including Seattle, October 20th, for the benefit of that home, which is located in Tacoma. Mrs. V. L. Spencer is president and matron of the Home and during the past year she has cared for twenty-one orphan children. It is incorporated under the charity laws of the state and the association already owns its own property, but owes about $1400 on it, and to pay off that debt is the object of the coming tag day. Mr. Maney has de voted a great deal ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 29 September 1917

but because I intend to try to make it use ful as well as ornamental. Evenings when I am not at work and see a chance to do a 'sight seeing' stunt for the fellow with the money, I will be there with bells on." Things have jnst been coming Jamison's way this week as the superintendent of the building where he works voluntarily gave him a substantial raise in his salary. F. Fritz Keeble has opened up a new equal rights barber shop, which is excep tionally well located for the up-town trade. Keeble is one of the best barbers in the city and with the location he has he ought to command a splendid trade from the very first. "My shop is between Second and Third avenues, 210 Madison street, in the Orpheum Theatre building. I thank you." Mrs. Will Jackson, 1033 Main street, is opening up a dining room, serving from 10 a. m. to 10 ]). in. Tfome cooking. Meals running from 35 cents up. Every Tuesday night, entertainment. El liott :2;")4. Moss Apartments. To strike or to not strike is the burn...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 6 October 1917

a\mmW aw M Ww __w _________r ______r ____^^^^^^ \y ___(_r mmr.w PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. In the Interest of equal rights and equal justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but In the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the state of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Office, 513 Faoiflo Blk. Telephone Vain 24. EDITORIAL PARAGRAPHS Evidently the mayorality chair will not Trimble this winter for W. P. has gone East for the season. Russia, it is believed, will best Germany in the long run, and if our memory serves us right, that is the way she bested Japan. Twelve thousand shipyard ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 6 October 1917

PASSING THRONG Mrs. L. C. Freeman and her daughter, .Mis. Clifford Scurry, have returned to Se ville and are at home to their friends. Mrs. Freeman has had Mrs. Maud Longus brought over from Tacoma that she may cnre for her during her illness. Mrs. liongus was formerly Miss Maud Ilarts fteld and was reared by Mrs. Freeman. Emmett H. Holmes of Spokane, grand master of the Masons of Washington and jurisdiction, was in the city this week mak ing his first tour of the various lodges in this jurisdiction. In discussing the gen eral condition of the colored folks in the Northwest he said, "It was never better ■ and all over Washington and Oregon they are doing exceedingly well." Mrs. J. W. Sweeney left for Kansas City last Tuesday evening and will be absent for the next eight weeks. She goes to visit her brother and sister, whom she has not seen for thirty years. Mrs. Sweeney is one of the faithful as well as effective Avorkers of the First A. M. E. church of this city and has done much f...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 6 October 1917

ROBERT BROOKS ALBERTSON In the death of Judge R. B. Albertson the community loses one of its most emi nent judicials and his loss is rightfully mourned by all. He has been prominent in public affairs in this community for the past thirty years and had been on the su perior court bench for the past fourteen years. He was very independent in poli tics and though he claimed to be a Repub lican, yet he generally did whatever he be lieved to be right, regardless of his party wishes. While a member of the legisla ture a civil rights bill in the interest of the colored folks of the state came before the body and though "Bob' 'Albertson did not fight it on the floor, yet he did not favor it and gave the editor hereof, who was fathering the bill, to understand as much, which caused a difference to arise between us, that lasted for many years. Time, how ever, heals all differences and later in life we talked the old score over and decided it was a dead issue and we were friends again. While i...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 6 October 1917

EVOLUTION OF A SUPERIOR RACE (Literary Diegst) "In the American mulatto the evolution of 8 superior race may be seen in process." This is the concluding sentence of an ar ticle on "The Superiority of the Mulatto," contributed by E. 15. Renter, of the Uni versity of Chicago, to The American Jour nal of Sociology (Chicago). By "superior" the writer means superior to the pure Ne gro race. At the same time, it should be noted, he denies any essential racial infer iority of the Negro to the white. That the mulatto is gaining ground he deduces in the first place from an examination of a list entitled "Who's Who in Colored America," compiled by Negroes and containing the names of 139 of the best-known American Negroes. In this list, Mr. Reuter says, there are not more than four men of pure Negro blood. The successful men of the race are, in fact, he asserts, nearly all of biracial an cestry. An examination of many other Ne gro Jists of successful colored physicians, writers .artists, music...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 27 October 1917

CAYTON'S WEEKLY pri ;e five cents OAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A in me interest of equal rights and equal justice to ill men and for "all men up." a i iiiilicatlon of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizen:- It |.« open to the towns and communities of the »tat< 'if Washington to air their public grienvances. S< ti:ii and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules if journalism. i dpion $2 per year in advance. Special atef?mn»e to clubs and societies. X KOSCOE CAYTON..Editor and Publisher Offtee, 513 Faciflo Blk. Telephone Main 24. V. SIDNEY STRONG jiis critics to the contrary, notwithstand ing it can be said without fear of success ful Contradiction that the Rev. Sidney Sirohg has never drawn an unpatriotic V«r«aiK and that the preservation of this oniom &ncl the protection of its fundamental principals are as dear to his heart as to dny wan w...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 27 October 1917

SEATTLE'S COLORED SOLDIERS On tomorrow, Saturday, the citizens of Seattle will again assemble to bid Uod speed to the twenty-five colored soldiers that will leave the same day for American Lake to join the cantonment at Camp Lewis to train for the trenches in Europe. When Ihis cantonment has its full comple ment, of colored troopers they will number in the neighborhood of thirty-seven thou sand and when all of the cantonments have their lull complement of colored soldiers there will be something like sixty thou sand colored soldiers in the service, and, if the war does not come to a speedy close as is being predicted at this time, we sus pect, that before another twelve months have passed five times that number will be in the service. If the present war con tinues, sentiment will play a very small part in getting soldiers for the front and the black man will be just as acceptable as the white man and in many instances more so. Our advice to the colored men going to war is that they ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 27 October 1917

PERCENTAGE OF PATRIOTS According to Dr. D. A. Nease, of New York, quoted in the Washington Post, of September 26, about 50 per cent of the people of the United States are true Ameri cans at heart. Assuming a total population of about 100,000,000 and a colored popu lation of about 10,000,000 (there are slight ly more of each), what does this signify? The 10,000,000 colored people are practi cally all Americans at heart—real Ameri cans. The rest of the population, 90,000,000, is composed of whites and various non descript peoples. Among these the 50 per cent, or 50,000,000, of un-Americans at heart must therefore be found. That is to say, we have about 55 per cent of whites and nondescritps who are not true patriots. Analysis: If Mr. Nease's estimate is cor rect, the percentage of true Americans among all the groups in our country are as follows: Colored, 100 per cent; whites and non descripts, 45 per cent. That is to say, about 55 per cent of the whites and nondescripts are not thoro...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 27 October 1917

i±iE NEGRO'S CO^U. ix>ol'lON TO AMERICAN ART Lfterary>L)igcßt Our only original contribution! to the domain of American art nave come to us through our Negro population. If this proposition is doubted one is asked to men tion what, besides the rag nine of the mod ern dance and the Uncle Kemui stories of Joel Chandler Harris, lias as yet "sprung from American soil ami out of American life." The originality and power of these artistic creations, declares lu\ James Wel don Johnson, Held secretary of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, have influenced and appealed not only to America, but the world. He places the most importance upon the "Uncle Kem us" stories and the spiritual or slave songs to which the Fisk Jubilee Singers made the public and musicians of the United States and Europe listen. The stories constitute the only folk-lore that America has pro duced, says Mr. Johnson in the New York Evening Post, and the slave melodies the only folk-songs, ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 3 November 1917

„,.-.:" \. ■ ! , ' „ • ',■'■ .■'.'-. 'I' - . - •"■ ■ ■.'< ■•-,■."..?■'' ■ '?■':.: ■/■?:■■> ■'.' ■: •, ■ , .'-."■ • .' • :'• ''!■;'■ '~i .•■ . . '' . •' .- "ii I ■.•>";": ! I ■ ' . • t ■■ ' ,::';■; PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. In the interest of equal rights and equal Justice to all men and for "all men up." A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the state of Washington to air their public grlenvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules of journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON..Editor and Publisher Office, 513 Paoifio Bile Telephone Main 84. EDITORIAL PARAGRAPHS From the thousand and one charges of graft on the part of the police of this city it occurs to us that, it is al...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 3 November 1917

was bOiviE BAJMQUJtii.' mere may have been more pleasing af ians pulled oir in oeattle than the one ten^ ue»eu to tiie colored conscript soldiers last Saturday, Out it so no one remembers when it occurred. It made you feel good way down in your toes to see 250 or more guests sitting at the banquet table feasting on the good things of the land, and to know that a sufficient amount of money was in the hands of the treasurer of the local commit tee to pay every cent of indebtedness that might reasonably be incurred for that oc casion. Chairman Black and the various members of the committee did themselves proud in its arrangements and it set a most brilliant precedent for the pulling off of similar events in the future. Caterer Stone was there with the goods and the elaborate menu was served without a hitch or a bawk and using the vernacular of the plan tation Negro, "it was jest as good as if it wus fur whit foks.'' Even the Seattle Daily Times changed its dirty vulgar slang in referen...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 3 November 1917

'FIGHT ON"—YOU NEGRO SOLDIERS (Mary M. T. Thompson) To arms you Negro soldiers, Fight for your country's gain, Shoulder your musket and knapsack, And march to the battle plain. You must fight to save your country, 'Tis a duty you owe by birth, Your kindred before you battled To save the Union's worth. Fight on you valiant soldiers, Tho' the cause you fight to win, May not be to your advantage, Your nation or your kin; You have fought in many battles, You have answered your countrys' call, Not for yourself or your people But, that others might not fall. 'Tis said that you show great courage, And will fight till you die or fall, 'Tis said you have never hindered Or shirked from duty's call. Fight on you Negro soldiers, To your captain's anaxious call, Fight on till your conscience tells you, That th-3 fighting should be for all. You are ready at a moment's calling, When your country needs your aid, You muster to the front like ferrets, With a courage that's not afraid. You must fight ...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 3 November 1917

HERE AND THERE An organization to be known as the Ne gro American Alliance, has been recently perfected and held its first general meet ing at Atlantic City, N. J. It plans to or ganize every person of Negro blood in the United States in one grand union to fight for the betterment of Negroes. It starts out with the announcement that, "it has no white friends and wants none, for there are no such beings." James A. Lightfoot is president and Floyd Delos Francis is sec retary. Twelve thousand colored troops are to be quartered at Funston, Kansas, and the white citizens of Junction City and Man hatton are registering their protests. The Indians of Oklahoma bought three million dollars worth of liberty bonds— bully for Mistah Injun. However, do not overlook the fact that the most of the al leged Indians of Oklahoma are white folks with Indian names. A new industrial school for colored youths has just thrown open its doors for students at Albany, Georgia. It is a state institution and the...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 10 November 1917

I PRICE FIVE CENTS CAYTON'S WEEKLY Published every Saturday at Seattle, Washington. U. S. A. In the Interest of equal rights and equal justice to all men and for "all men up.'" A publication of general information, but in the main voicing the sentiments of the Colored Citizens. It is open to the towns and communities of the state of Washington to air their public grienvances. Social and church notices are solicited for pub lication and will be handled according to the rules . of Journalism. Subscription $2 per year in advance. Special rates made to clubs and societies. HORACE ROSCOB CAYTON. .Editor and Publisher Office, 513 Pacific Blk. Telephone Main 24. CLEAN UP THE TOWN Twenty-five years of constant residence in Seattle has given us an opportunity to hear this old song sung many times. Se attle has always been in the grip of a vice graft syndicate and we have our suspic ions that its in the grip of this self same outfit at present. For fifteen or more years the Clancy-Burns syndi...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 10 November 1917

HERE AND THERE St. Louis, Mo., is erecting a Y. M. C. A. building for colored folks, which is to cost $180,000, the corner stone of which was recently laid and was witnessed by 10,000 persons. When the colored draft for the army is completed there will be eighty three thous and colored soldiers in uniform and thirty thousand of these will be sent to France for the trenches as soon as they can be transported. Ten thousand colored children have been enrolled in the schools of St. Louis, Mo., which is 1,000 more than last year and 1,500 more than the year before. Who, after reading this statement, can doubt but that the Negroes of St. Louis are coming. There are in the neighborhood of 700 col ored soldiers at Camp Lewis and they are still coming in. It is reported that the col ored soldiers will be transferred to an east ern cantonment within the next* three months. I. F. Norris of Seattle has isued a call to the colored citizens of the state of Wash ington inviting them to assemble th...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 10 November 1917

IN THE PUBLIC EYE Mrs. F. Fritz Keeble is home after an absence of three months and enoyed her trip very much. Chauncey W. Jamison, with a few friends motored to Camp Lewis last Sunday. He made the trip in a little over an hour's time, thus equaling the Interurban's time. Mrs. John Byron Parker left for Spo kane one day this week, where she will re main for an indefinite period. Harry, her only son, that is not in the government serv ice is quite sick and she will remain with him until there is a change in his condition. Rev. Hayden has been assigned to the pastorate of the Grace Presbyterian church during the absence of the Rev. Johnson, who is doing chaplin duties at Camp Lewis, and will preach his first sermon next Sun day morning. Elbert Booker of Seattle, was in the city three hours last Sunday morning on his way to training camp. Mr. Booker, who is a relative of the Jamison families of this city is first lieutenant and was recently drafted. He was the breakfast guest of Mr. an...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Cayton's weekly. — 10 November 1917

VOTES FOR WOMEN (The Crisis) Some 75,000 Negro voters in the State of New York will be asked to decide this month as to whether or not they are will ing that women should have the vote in that State. It is an unpleasant but well-known fact that hitherto American Negro voters have, in the majority of cases, not been fa vorable to woman suffrage. This attitude has been taken for two main reasons: First, the Xegro, still imbued by the ideals of a past generation, does not realize the new status of women in industrial and social life. Despite the fact that within his own group women are achieving economic inde pendence even faster than whites, he thinks of these as exceptional and abnormal and looks forward to the time when his wages will be large enough to support his wife and daughters in comparative idleness at home. Secondly, the American Negro is particu larly bitter at the attitude of many white women : at the naive assumption that the height of his ambition is to marry them, at t...

Publication Title: Cayton's Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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