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Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1902

piloted the firm out of its difficul ties in less than three years, and announced to the court an offer to the creditors of ioo cents on the dollar. Then came the reorganization under the name of the Z. C. Miles & Piper Co. The success of the new com pany was instantaneous, and soon they were compelled to secure ad ditional room. The only solution was the erection of a new and large modern building. With that object in view, the company se lected a location which would fit the business, an eight-story block at First Avenue and Spring Street. Here the company now has its main store. The business at the Northwest Fixture Annex was purchased August 27th last, and the com bined floor space of the two stores is about 60,000 square feet. Mr. Kasson, who was president of the Northwest Fixture Com pany, joins the consolidated com panies, and this story would not be complete without a few words of his. He is a native of New York State, coming to Seattle in 1888. In 1890 he engaged in the...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1902

10 THE BEST TIME TO CHOOSE A DAIRY COW. G. H. Clark. The best time to judge a dairy cow is when ih« is giving her greatest flow of milk. This time will suit our pur poses very well for the cow will not then be preg&ant by an undesirable sire, and will have her next calf from lne sire selected for the purpose of improving the dairy qualities. Some of the objections to choosing the cow at this time of life are that the suc ceeding offspring may be influenced in an undesirable direction by the prev ious impregnation, and the previous care, feed and milking of the cow may nst have been such as to develop her dairy qualities to the best advantage. Since it is known that acquired habits and conditions of life are often trans mitted to later generations, the latter objection affects not only the profits from the milk of the dam, but may be detrimental to the offspring. These objections can be overcome only by beginning with young heifers, and this is equally objectionable unless the an...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1902

changing, and a man who keeps abreast of them must be a man of brains. This is especialy true on the farm and in the dairy.—D. H. O. * HOLD TOO MUCH LAND. Perusal of census bulletins show that the noble red man is holding down too much good American sod. His paletace competitor needs these areas in bis business of creating wealth. Why the Indian should monopolize vast stretches of the best land in the west, utilizing it for no better purpose than raising scrub ponies, is something that needs explanation. All this land is not worth much to the Indian. Uncle Sam should lose no time in taking it off his hands at a fair valuation, and give the army of homeseekers a chance to develop it. HAND SEPARATORS INCREASING. The number of hand separators on farms is increasing both in this coun try and in Europe. There is a con stant conflict of opinion between those in favor of the hand separator and those in favor of milk delivered whole to the central creamery. Each me thod has an advantage. Wi...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1902

12 COMMON SENSE BREEDING. The average farmer is apt to look upon the business of "fine stock" breeding as beyond his capital and ability. By fine stock he of course means pedigreed, registered stock, and his idea of such animals is that they are difficult to find, difficult to raise and maintain in their original excellence, and costly. He makes the mistake of thinking that no stock is fine unless possessed of pedigrees en titling it to entry in the respective stud or herd book of its kind. Let us say for his benefit that "all is not gold that glitters"; all stock is not really fine by reason of the mere fact that it is pedigreed. Live stock prop erly produced from common sense mating of excellent animals may in deed be excellent in most respects or only fall short of perfection on ac count of some admixture of blood or slight deviation from a right line in breeding which renders it ineligible to registry. Of such character were the magnificent Shorthorn feeding cat tle bred by Gile...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1902

CONTAGIOUS KERATITIS IN CAT TLE. S. B. Nelson, D. V. M., State Experi ment Station. The Veterinary Department has re ceived during the past few weeks nu merous reports from Douglas, Lincoln, Whitman and Walla Walla counties, relative to a peculiar disease affecting the eyes of cattle, in some cases the affection being so serious that it re sulted in the destruction of the eye sight. Investigations made to determine the nature of the disease show it to be identical with contagious keratitis —contagious opthalmia—which has been observed in the middle Eastern states for some years past. Symptoms. The first symptoms noticed is a swelling of the eyelids and a flow uf tears over the face. The animal will also try to rub the eye on some ob ject, generally its front leg, showing the presence of an irritation or itch ing. These premonitory symptoms are followed by a true inflammation of the cornea. Upon a close examination of the eye it la seen that the disease has its be ginning in or near ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1902

14 i MOULTON'S CADILLAC SALT I /ft „„ „ Piano, 111., Aug. 10, 1900. \j> A PURE-99.38 per cent. . Mesgrg Francig D Moulton &Co ( Jg A KEEPS LOOSE in the package—see Gentlemen: I have found Moulton"* Jg JP testimonials. Cadillac Salt to be all right, and would W fflj ECONOMICAL in quantity needed to not uge &ny other yy /|\ salt butter properly. , Yours truly, ft} §EVEN GRAIN, excelling all other .. Piano Creamery, X* domestic brands in this respect. Wm Grelch, Propr. jK BULKY AND FLAKY, filling the F"^ 1 - _. 1 yjf largest barrel of any butter salt on the 1 |^% I m m 1 Heizer, Kas., June 22, 1900. \fr § market. • 1 M Wm^, 1 %# 1 Messrs. Francis D. Moulton & Co., •?& PRICE lower for quality given than WBtUr PHBi^fegm w ■ Gentlemen: Moulton's Cadillac Salt W any other domestic dairy salt. . is satisfactory in every respect. It is W NOTE—If butter is dry before salt- nice tQ handle; does not require so \M ting, %of an ounce to a pound of but- _ __ much to galt butter ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1902

GRAND AUCTION SALE SHORTHORNS FROM OAK HILL FARM Spokane Interstate Fair Oct. 10, 1902. Forty Head of Strictly First-Class Breeding Cattle. Including our Great Show Herd of this Year. FOR CATALOG ADDRESS Frank Brown, Mgr., North Yamhill, Or. COL. T. C. CALAHAM, Auctioneer, Omaha, Neb. THE RANCH. OF <$

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 October 1902

Ib • ••••••••••••••••••••••••• •«•••••••••••••••••••• t ••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• The time has been when there was abundant free range for the herds of cattle that supplied the people of the world with meat. Free range is rapidly becoming a thing of the past.- The present HIGH PRICE OF BEEF proves this, and also proves to the wide-awake farmer that there is more good money in livestock than in any ■, , other branch of farming. . ... . -. The best pasture or meadow is to be obtained by sowing a number of different varieties. In sowing a PASTURE you want to form a sod that will not be easily destroyed by the trampling of stock, you also wish to plant such varieties that you will have a succession of crops following one another the year round. On the other hand, in sowing for HAY you wish to plant such grasses as will mature at the same season, yet will form a smooth, even sod, free from bunches. What grasses will you plant on that wet bottom? What grasses wi...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1902

: , 5 1 s I A mO-'-l'tJ •! >'i.. ..l'1 |,^'l,:i:*_.::"'r I.ji!.'HI'i;i »J' .}!-, ;.mi..|,:Jii |,.i;..i .J1;-;!-. , , :i...J.. J : >.":•.; ';y_' -■ :- -*» -■ < i :- - ' :- : V' '. ' - ■ "- ; ■".■.:■ ■- ■ - - ■■■■ '_J___J^^^^^wMpM^^^Ml»^ '===Sjr^^B Ninettsnth Yiar PROSPECTS. Herbert Myrick, editor of the Amer ican Agriculturist, is always mixing up in some new movement. His latest is the championing of "The People's Coal League," designed "To Perma nently Solve the Coal Question." You can make remittances to this new as sociation in amounts all the way from 10 cents to $100. the various sums giving the contributor proportionate honors—the $100 donation drawing a vice-presidency. * * *. The Fruitgrowers' Union of Yakima County is considering the advisability of establishing a house in Seattle to handle the products of its members. This plan has been proven quite prof itable in some sections, and The Ranch does not see any reason why it should not be a success here, provid ing ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1902

3 THE U. S. l*jk SEPARATOR SHOWS M ITS SUPERIORITY. J^ At the Oregon State Fair this year one, of the attractions was a contest-between the different makes of cream separa tors, and, as usual, the U. S. beat everything. Read the following letter, and notice particularly the different skimmilk tests: Portland, Ore., Sept. 19, 1902. Vermont Farm Machine, Co., . ; < V , Gentlemen: In contest at our.State Fair yesterday THE U. S. SEPARATOR BEAT EV ERYTHING THERE, leaving only two one-hundredths on skimmilk, while the DeLaval, Sharpies and National tied at .06. The Empire leaving .11 and the Reed .12. \ HAZEL WOOD CREAM COMPANY, By E. Burr. The above letter reiterates the fact that the U. S. SEPARATOR SKIMS THE CLEANEST and the letter below that the U. S. SEPARATOR IS THE MOST DURABLE. ; Colfax, Wash., Sept. 10, 1902. Hazelwood, Co., Spokane, Wash. Gentlemen: i In reply to yours of the 9th inst., will say in the last four years there have been something like 75 U. S. Cream Separators ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1902

I m c RancjJ With which Is consolidated The Washington FaruiPr, The Pacific Coast Dairyman, The Farmer and Dairymau, The Farmer and Turfman. Official organ of the State Dairymen's Associa tion and the Htate Live Stock Breeders' Associa tion. MILLER FREEMAN, - Editor and Manager. Editorial Ottices: - - - Seattle, Wash. Tel. Main 1266—Long Distance Connection. BUSINESS OFFICES: Seattle - - Metropolitan Bldg., Cor. Third and Main Sts. Spokane - Alexander & Co., 521 First Aye. Subscription (In advance) f 1.00 per year. Agents wanted in every town to solicit subscrip tions. Good commission and salaries paid. The paper is sent to each subscriber until an or der to discontinue is received from the subscriber. We must be notifled in writing, by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer, as we cannot Hud it on our list from the name alone on the pa per. We must have both name and address, and all arrearages or dues must be paid...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1902

4 AN EPITAPH ON PRUNE ASSOCIA TIONS. It is dead, or nearly so. The fol lowing epitaph is suggested: "He digged a pit he digged it deep. He digged it lor his brother; And for his sin, he did fall in The pit he digged for t'other." In trying to "do" the packers, they "got did" themselves, and, unfortu nately, at the expense of the grow <M S. A dispatch from San Jose informs us that the large sum of money still on hand and due to the growers who raised prunes Anno Domini 1900 is to be, virtually "thrown into chan cery," or, in other words, it will not be disturbed except at the ruling of the courts when decisions may be rendered as to certain entanglements into which the C. C. F. A. has found itself. That is the Parthian shot of an association which could not learn wisdom by experience, but whose blunders increased with age.—Pacific Fruit World. THE DARK SIDE OF FARM LIFE. J. H. Worst. The first thing the American farmer must learn is to look upon his occu pation as a dignified prof...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1902

PROSPEROUS SEPARATOR CON CERN. The Bellows Falls, Vt., local paper says: The contract for building a new machine shop 60x172 feet, two stories high with a basement 17x113 feet, for the Vermont Farm Machine company has been awarded to E. I. Kilburn of this place. Work will be begun at once and the building pushed to completion as rapidly as possible. The new shop will be located to the west of the present main building, and will add greatly to the manufacturing capacity of the company. The new ad dition to the main building 40x60 feet and three stories high has just been completed. A store-house four stories high, to be located along the line of the electric road and so ar ranged that freight cars can be backed into the building for loading is a possibility of the near future. It was only last winter that this com pany built and equipped a handsome new office building. All these changes and additions give the Vermont Farm Machine company one of the largest and best equipped manufactu...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1902

6 STATE IRRIGATION ASSOCIATION. Bdttor The Ranch: At a meeting held at North Yakima October 2, the Irrigation Association of the State of Washington was organized. Officers were elected as follows: S. J. Har rison, president. Sunnyside; Ralph Kauffman. first vice pres., Ellensburg: Fred C. Hall, treasurer. North Yaki ma; Arthur Gunn, second vice presi dent, Wenatchee; Marshall S. Scud der, secretary. North Yakima. The object of this association is to en courage the reclamation of the arid lands of this state and the building of reservoirs to conserve the water supply of the United States govern ment. The recent enactment of an irrigation law by congress has made it possible to secure the aid of the government in this work. Every dol lar of government money invested here will inure to the benefit, direct ly or indirectly, of every citizen of the state. In order that the work may be promptly undertaken and suc cessfully completed, it is necessary that a general desire of the public fo...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1902

LOSS rN MILKING. Few farmers have an idea of the im portance of milking cows clean, taking the very last drops possible. As a rule they look only to the actual loss of that milking, forgetting that in not taking the last drops they reduce the future yield of the cow. Milking should be considered the most important work and, harvest or no harvest, the hired man or the chil dren should be sent to that job on time every afternoon and not at any old time when this or that job is fin ished. In a letter to Hoard's Dairyman Prof. Woll says: "I find that in many of the herd vis ited the milking is far from clean, and a loss of fifteen to twenty per cent, in the fat produced by the cows is by no means uncommon. In one Guernsey herd tested last week we obtained 0.64 lbs. of fat in the after milking from one cow, on the twenty-four hour test, an increase of over seventy-five per cent, in the production of the cow. The increased amount of milk obtained in this case was five and one half pounds ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1902

8 WASHINGTON AGRICULTURE. By W. A. Henry in llicedcrs Cnzcttc, Headers of this journal have been promised something concerning my so journ in the Pacific Northwest. Pass ing over 1,500 miles of interesting travel we find ourselves in the great wheat region of southeastern Wash ington—the Palouse country. Every one has heard of this far-famed region but I am quite sure that all will be willing to learn more concerning it. The soil of the Palouse country is dust-like in character, having origi nated from basaltic rock; it is of the richest character, and where deep, as it is in this region, it forms the basis for a sure agriculture where the rair fall is sufficient. The most strik ing characteristic of this region is the hills. The accompanying view will give an idea of the Palouse country in general and is as good as is pos sible to secure from a single outlook fixed by th^ camera. The hills are like the billows of the sea, rising from fifty to 200 or even 300 feet above the valleys ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1902

by stirring and skimming it I take out the straws, white caps, etc., that in terfere with drilling. One man can vitriol and skim more wheat in this way than he could clear in a fanning mill, and more than he can vitriol in parrel. So I find it economical and sure. It don't pay to raise smut. One fourth smut in a twenty-bushel crop means a loss of five bushels to the acre, besides danger of blowing up machines and being disagreeable to work in. It easily represents a loss mat takes off the profits, and gener ally more. . "I believe if farmers would adopt this method, keeping plenty of vitriol in the bag in water, and let it be in the water long enough to absorb the vitriol before putting in the wheat, that we would not hear many, if any, complaints about smut, especially if you choose wheat for seed free from smut, although I have got new kinds of wheat twice from others that was smutty, and sowed and raised no smut. "It might be well to immerse th: bag that you intend putting your w...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1902

10 THE NEW WESTMINSTER SHOW. Flying along the polished rail, in a Great Northern train, we crossed the imaginary line that divides Cana da from the United States, on our way from Seattle to New Westmin ster, B. C, on Tuesday afternoon, and speeding along I could not help but hear the frequent ejaculation, "How much better the roads are on this side than on ours!" "Why?" was the thought that would not down, as there is no apparent good reason for this difference, which if it exists at all should appear in our favor, as we have a far larger population, relative ly, than our cousins on father side. When the train stopped to go no more, we saw the great oridge com mencing to be built across the Frazer —giant dredges doing the work of many men in founding the great piers that are to hold the superstructure for rail and wagon roads, thus bring ing the great corporation of Uncle Sam to lock horns with the Canadian Pacific at its Vancouver and Victoria termini. Does this mean war or peace? ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1902

head was pretty and yet full of the masculinity that indicates prepotency. His color is that beautiful light roan and his horn —oh, don't orget the horn, upon which some nang all the weight, was heavy enough to show constitution, while being o- excellent color and well shapeu. Mr. Ladner took- second with a home bred two year old bull and herd prize, while he had also prize-winning calves. He had large, young serviceable females with him, -but they were not in show condition. Some of them are deep milkers. Mr. H. Vasey is another en terprising young stocKman who de serves a special mention. Only re cently has he commenced to build up his stock; yet he had extremely fine animals in each section. His two year-old uull was bought from John Bright, Myrtle, Ont., and was im ported in dam. He had a beautiful cow which was placed second here to a cow she beat at Ladners. She was hard to fault, though not in show shape. In horseflesh Mr. Vasey ex celled with his beautiful three-year old sta...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 October 1902

1* , SPOKANE FAIR PREMIUMS. The following awards were made in the cattle exhibit: Shorthorns. Best bull over 3 years —First prize, $25, C. E. Ladd, North Yamhill, Ore.; second prize, $15, John Sparks, Reno, Nev. Best bull over 2and under three years—First prize, $20, C. E. Ladd, North Yamhill, Ore. Best bull over 1 and under 2 years —First prize, $25, C. E. Ladd, North Yamhill, Ore.; second prize, $7, C. E. Ladd, North Yamhill, Ore. Best bull calf under 1 year— First prize, $10, C. E. Ladd, North Yam hill, Ore.; second prize, C. E. Ladd, North Yamhill, Ore. Best cow over 3 years, in calf or milk—First prize, $25, C. E. Ladd, North Yamhill, Ore.; second prize, $15, C. E. Ladd, North Yamhill, Ore. Best heifer over 2 and under 3 years —First prize, $20, C. E. Ladd, North Yamhill, Ore.; second prize, $10, C. E. Ladd, North Yamhill, Ore. Best heifer calf under 1 year—First prize, $10, C. E. Ladd; second prize, $5, C. E. Ladd. Herefords. Best bull over 3 years old —First prize, $25, John ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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