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Elephind.com contains 3,401 items from Boston Pilot (1838-1857), samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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A SONG. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 17 January 1846

A SONG. Entitled Hugh O’Neill’s defiance of the Earl of Essex, Lord Deputy of Ireland, in the reign of Queen Elizabeth. AIR “ PADDIES EVERMORE.” Go tell your surly Saxon Queen, I value not her might; My arm is strong —my sword is keen, To fight for Ireland’s right: Go say I serve not as she ax ills— Her bribes shall not prevail, I proudly tread my native hills, My name is “ The O’Neill.” The Hy-Niall race for ages trod, Those hills and mountains blue ; They lived,and loved,and worshipp’d God, As freemen still should do; And tho’ their graves are round us now, Their souls yet watch our weal, And by their souls, no bawd shall bow The glorious “ Clan O’Neill.” I’ll hunt the w'olf—l’ll chase the roe, From mountain-pass to plain ; Nor flood, nor fen, nor fence, nor foe, Shall dare to check my rein. Those glens are mine,those wild woods all, From JMaghera, to the Pale ; And here I’ll stand, or here I’ll fall, As should “ The Chief O’Neill.” For Ireland’s right my sword I’ll draw, E’en sho...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
SKETCHES FROM CONGRESS. NUMBER IV. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 17 January 1846

SKETCHES FROM CONGRESS. NUMBER IV. Washington, Jan. 6th, 1846. J)ly dear Pilot, —Since my last, we have had very little of interest in either Houses of Congress, with the exception of the debate on Oregon, in the House of Representatives- The Senate has been doing comparatively nothing. New Year’s Day passed over very pleasantly. There was a great crowd of people at the President’s, at Mrs, Madison’s, at John Quincy Adams’s, &.c. The debate on Oregon has assumed an important aspect since Mr. Adams spoke on Friday last. He came out for the whole of Oregon, and for giving notice to the British Government, of the termination of the joint occupancy. This was important, coming from Mr. Adams. I believe I had not time to inform you, for your last paper, that the debate on Nativism was concluded last week. Two Whigs spoke against the measure on the last day, so that all the members of both parties who spoke on the subject opposed this contemptible and bigotted party. Neither Wh...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
TWENTY-NINTH CONGRESS. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 17 January 1846

TWENTY-NINTH CONGRESS. In Senate, Thursday, Jan. 8, Mr. Benton’s bill for raising a regiment of mounted riflemen, which was yesterday ordered to a third reading, was taken up, read a third time, and passed. Mr. Allen, from the committee on foreign relations, reported the joint resolution advising the President to give notice of the termination of the convention in twelve months, with an amendment abrogating; the convention at once, and directing the President to issue his proclamation at the end of twelve months for taking possession of the whole territory. He said he was instructed to move an early day for its consideration. * He would not make the motion now, because a senator had intimated to him that he intended to start a preliminary question,which had better be disposed of first. He would propose Monday for this motion; then the preliminary question would be started; after which he should move the Senate to fix a day to take up the joint resolution. The following is the amende...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
ANNEXATION. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 17 January 1846

ANNEXATION. The following is a correct copy of the resolutions offered by Mr. McConnell, in the House of Representatives, a skeleton of which we published last week : Resolved, That we hail the elevated feeling which now universally prevails in our glorious confederacy to strengthen and consolidate the principles of Republican freedom, and extend the blessings of our free institutions in every practicable quarter of the Universe, in the spirit of Christian love, and peaceful brotherhood. Resolved, That while we hail the admission of Texas (which fought its way to independence,) as a sister State iuto our Union, and view with unaffected pride and satisfaction, the patriotic resolutions of the Executive government and Congress of the United States, to uphold our title to Oregon, and also observe the growing desire to incorporate Mexico, Yucatan, California, &.C., in the confederacy—that Ireland is fully entitled to share the blessings of our free institutions. Resolved, Th...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 17 January 1846
Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements Column 1 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 17 January 1846

IMPORTED CATHODIC ceived lit the Brooklyn Catholic nient of English Books, not printed i following are a few of those received, daloue’s, Massillon’s, Wheeler’s, Whi 2d series, Gahan’s, Murphy’s, Ullathi Rigby’s Sermons; Reeve’s History of History of the Bible, with cuts; McII petuity of the Faith; D’Sale’s Love < roinary, Manning’s Reply to Leslie’s ! gious Life; English Martyrology: Po Family, a Catholic novel; Gahan’s Hi New Testament; Soliloquies of the Kempis; Lanigau on Penance; Lanig: diarist, &c, Sec. These, together with a general asso tholic Books printed U this country, ; as reasonable terms as at anv other si THOMAS O’lX 252 Fulton street N. B. Agent lor that sterling, I newspaper, the Boston Pilot, the lat America—devoted to the elevation o abroad, the independence oflrelatid a toriaii prejudice, &c. Also for Brow, Jan 10 SADDIER’S IDDUSTRAI OF THE DIVES OF TH] LIVES OF THE FATHERS, AL principal Saints: compiled from orig other authent...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Page 4 Advertisements Column 2 [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 17 January 1846

Notices of this kind inserted four times for $l. INFORMATION WANTED, ~~ Of PATRICK CLARK, a native of co. Kilkenny, parish of Ball yens kill. When last heard from was in Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, (alfcput lb years ago). Any information respecting him will be thankfully received by his sister, Julia Clark, or by John B. llenncssy, 64 Canal street, Providence, ILL Jan 17 Of PATRICK SULLIVAN, Fohonough, in the parish of Moore, west ofUingle, co. Kerry, who sailed lor St. John. N.B, in May, Io4J, auu iiasuot been heard from since. Any information resjiectiiig him w ill be thankfully received by his brother, Michael Sullivan, now living in Port Carbon, Schuylkill County, Pa. Janl7 Of CATHERINE SULLIVAN, otherwise THOMPSON, wile of Dennis Sullivan, deceased, a native of the parish of Kerf, near Mulltown, county Kerry. When last heard from she was iu Savannah, Ga. Any information of her will be thankfully received by her bnrtlier-iii-law, John Sullivan, No. 6 North Russell st, Boston, ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Items. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 17 January 1846

Items. New York Passenger Tax. We have noticed a paragraph circulating in the northern papers to the effect that the cause, urgued some weeks ago before the Supreme Court of the United States respecting the authority of a state to lay and collect a tax on all passengers arriving in its ports, had been decided in favor of the validity of such an exercise of state authority. We supposed the information to be incorrect, as we have not been informed in the manner usual with this paper; and, on inquiry yesterday in the proper quarter, we learn that no decision whatever has as yet been made in the case. —National Intelligencer. More clerical delinquency. Elder Whitman, pastor of the Baptist Church at Perma Corners, say f s the Rochester Democrat, has been arrested on a charge of having guilty intercourse with the wife of one of his parishioners. A case of Breach of Marriage Contract was recently tried in the Lewis county (N. Y.) Circuit Court. The parties were Miss Lydia Adams and Homer C...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
GOD’S MERCIES IN IRELAND. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 17 January 1846

GOD’S MERCIES IN IRELAND. From Art Maguire, by Carleton. About a month or so before the departure of Frank and Art from the Corner House, Jemmy Murray and another man W'ere one day in the beginning of May strolling through one of his pasture-fields. His companion w as a thin, hard-visaged little fellow, with a triangular face, and drybristly hair, very much thd color of, and nearly as prickly as, a withered furze bush; both, indeed, yvere congenial spirits, for it is only necessary to say, that he- of the furze bush was another of tiiose charitable and generous individuals yvhose great delight consisted, like his friend Murray, in watching the seasons, and speculating upon the failure of the crops. He had tLe reputation of being wealthy, and in fact was so; indeed, of the two, those who had reason to know, considered that he held the weightier purse: his name was Cooney Fimgan, and the object of his visit to Murray—their conversation, however, will sufficiently dcvelope that. Both, ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE PILOT. THE RELIGIOUS MOVEMENT IN ENGLAND. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 17 January 1846

THE PILOT. THE RELIGIOUS MOVEMENT IN ENGLAND. Among the notices of conversions published last week, inay be found that of Mr. Faber, author of The Cherwell, Water Lily, and other poems,” we know not whether the case of Mr. Faber be a peculiar one or not; but his name, as it caught our own eye, suggested an idea which did not occur in reading any former account of these conversions. It would seein, that the liberal and inquiring turn of mind, which is necessary to a high order of tulent, and which has been generally thought to incline the mind towards the exercise of private judgment in matters of Faith, and even to Infidelity, is now leaning the other way. Hitherto we have regarded the clerical converts of the English Church as honest and pious men, but not as men of tne world; as theologians and black-letter scholars, ratheV than students of human nature and general philosophy. Mr. Faber’s name has given our reflections another turn. He is a man of varied talents and liberal educat...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
AGENTS AND CORRESPONDENTS. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 17 January 1846

AGENTS AND CORRESPONDENTS. The Fair. We received the following, in relation to the lines published in our last:— Oh, Sir, ’twas not there, So near the large chair, That I wished you to go: ’Tis true there were eyes, there, That were looking for you, But in truth they were looking For someone else, too. At the table adjoining, There’s a beautiful pair That look only to you, To gladden the Fuir. New Haven, Ct. A correspondent in this place writes us:— “Here the Pilot is all the go—every true lover of Ireland has it, and numbers are running in to add their names to the 8,000 subscribers already on its list. But no wonder—as O’Connell has pronounced it “the best paper in America.” It is true that it does not, like the Freeman, boast of being religious —but it practices it, which is better far than empty professions. The Repealers are in extacies at the course pursued by their friends in Boston, and are ready to be enrolled to lick John Bull in Oregon at an hour’s notice. We would be gla...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
CHRISTMAS HOLYDAYS IN ROME. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 17 January 1846

CHRISTMAS HOLYDAYS IN ROME. A recent work has been published by the Appletons of New York, written by Rev. Mr. Kip, a Protestant Clergyman of Albany, N.Y, from which we select the following extract. It is taken from the chapter upon the “ Fraternities of Rome,” and is descriptive of those every day scenes of mournful interest —the ' ‘ Funerals at Rome”:— There are probably few communities in the world which can equal that of Rome in charitable associations. They are called Confraternities , and are formed by the voluntary union of individuals, often of high rank, who, in the midst of all the wretchedness around them, devote a portion of their time to its relief. Many of these are never seen by the mere traveller, or their existence even suspected, for their sphere of labour is private, yet it would be difficult to estimate the amount of happiness they must diffuse. One fraternity, for example, is intended to seek out humble, but respectable families who would not be likely to apply ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
Review. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 17 January 1846

Review. Art Maguire; or, the Broken Pledge. A Narrative. By William Carle ton. New York: Published by Edicard Dunigan , 151 Fulton street. Boston: Patrick Donahoe, No. 1 Spring Lane. The powers of Carleton chiefly consist in his shrewd observation of human nature, and his strong sense of the ridiculous. Not that he is deficient in pathos; but he is less at home: he inclines to overload his serious passages with words and descriptions so as frequently to mar their effect. There is a rich mine, almost untouched, for Irish genius yet to work. From the days of Swift to Carleton, Irish humor has been explored, and every point of the ridiculous in the national character fully brought out; but nearly all that is sublime and pathetic in Ireland and her people has been singularly overlooked. The sublime and beautiful as developed by Gruttan and Burke, by Sheridan and Curran, by Goldsmith and Moore, are, with a few exceptions in the latter, not Irish and national, but classical and European. ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE ANNEXATION OF IRELAND. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 17 January 1846

THE ANNEXATION OF IRELAND. THE PILOT. SATURDAY, JANUARY 17, 1840. All our readers, we doubt not, have by this time read, and pondered over the proposition in Congress of Gen. McConnell, and the speech of Mr. Robert Tyler, in Philadelphia, in both of which the policy of creating, and sustaining a revolutionary party in Ireland is recommended. Although there is no great probability that such a measure will be either adopted on this side the Atlantic, or accepted on the other, nevertheless, as it has been very seriously proposed, we may consider its feasibility, and its probable results. First, let it be remembered, that the leaders of the Repeal movement are pledged against revolution. Whatever they may think of Republicanism, they are of opinion that the blood which would be wasted, and the derangement of society involved by its establishment in Ireland, situated as that Country is, would not be repaid by its comparative advantages. Hence, while they denounce the legislation of the B...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE DOG IN THE MANGER. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 17 January 1846

THE DOG IN THE MANGER. On Friday, last week, in the House, Mr. Levin delivered himself of a speech about Oregon. The thing is a curiosity; and a sketch of it may he seen on our fourth page. One would suppose that the party which opposed emigration to this country would not care how much it was carried on by another: if they were afraid of being drowned by the stream that flows upon our shores, we might imagine they would be glad to have it turned into some other channel; but not so, says the wisdom of Rowdyism:—“He did not wish to go for a title (to Oregon) beyond the principle asserted by Mr. Monroe, that this country is consecrated to freedom, and that no European colonization w r ould be permitted. They are for neither colonizing themselves, nor letting other people!” We understand that Mr. Levin is not considered entirely a fit exponent of the enlightened views, and the system of his party. There are men, it seems, whose views are much more enlarged and consistent, and who are e...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
THE NEXT ARRIVAL. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 17 January 1846

THE NEXT ARRIVAL. All the seekers of news are in agonies about the next arrival; it is said there never was such excitement. The New York papers are prepared, it seems, to give immense sums for the first scrap of exclusive intelligence. If it be news upon the subject of war they are so interested about, we think we can tell them, pretty nearly, what that news will be like, or rather what it will not be like. There is good reason to believe it will not be of a warlike character. It may be remembered that, last session, the opposition in Parliament drew out the Minister on the Oregon question as j handled in the President’s Message. It was then that things first assumed a hostile aspect. The cotton merchants and manufacturers of Britain became alarmed. Now, these merchants and manufacturers form the stamina of the Anti-Corn Law League. They know that the agitation for Free Trade cannot go on in time of war; so, as it must languish in either case, they have made a junction with the Whi...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
MARY O’LAVERY. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 17 January 1846

MARY O’LAVERY. CAROL MALONE. Maids ! no more envy nor jealousy have ; Mary O’La very’s gone to her grave, Young Peter Conway has murdered his darling, The flower of the North, and the pride of Kihvarlin.— “ Mother! I’ll go when iny uncle is hiding •, On his white head, the storm, in its fury, is chiding. Bread and wine, and milk, warm from the cow, let me carry ; And uwhile by his side, on this wild night, I’ll tarry i With good hopes, and good tidings, I’ll strive to amuse him, And thaw his cold limbs, with my breath, and my bosom. I’ll unburden my soul of its sin, and its sorrow, And shrive, and prepare for what corneth to-morrow. Alas, for the priests of our faith, and our nation ! To be hunted like beasts in the wilds of creation !” “ Go to the work that thy spirit is bent on ; ’Tis an errand that angels have often been sent on ; But not in thy bridal dress, Mary, my child ! Through the bog, and the forest, all trackless and wild. Wear it not in the darkness of night, and of sor...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
FASTING. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 17 January 1846

FASTING. We observed in an exchange paper of last week, quite a labored production on fasting, and an attempt to disprove its utility. So did one Tom Paine, in times of yore, attempt to write down Christianity. And he found gaping listeners and ready believers. So, doubtless, will our exchange friend. It is so convenient and charming, not to have to forego the beef and gravy, and so very agreeable not to be stinted in the number or measure of one’s meals. But we have not now the intention to show the fitness and necessity of observing the fasts prescribed by the Church. This we may do at a future day; at present we intend only to perform an act of charity towards the above-mentioned exchange paper, the name of which we intentionally withhold, that the act may extend itself to all of our religious cotemporaries. We wish simply to correct a very material error into which the writer has fallen, with regard to the nature and obligation of a Catholic fast. He assumes as the basis of his ...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
ADULT EDUCATION. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 17 January 1846

ADULT EDUCATION. Some time ago a movement was commenced in Boston for the promotion of Adult Education; and though it has not advanced with great rapidity, it is not contemplated to give it up. As there are few of our readers who may not be able in some way to advance the object, we Avill explain it as nearly as we can. It is not the same as that educational progress Avhich has become so brisk in Ireland under the direction of the Temperance and Repeal Societies, although we hope to have an advancement of that sort here, too. The movement in the old country is a promotion of intelligence, and intellectual habits, among the moderately educated classes. It has been effected by the establishment of Reading Rooms, the publication of standard books, in a cheap form, and the circulation of newspapers conducted, like the Nation, by talents of the highest order. Under these appliances the intelligence of the community, already equal to that of England, has sprung up so, as probably to be un...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
DOINGS IN BRITISH AMERICA. [Newspaper Article] — Boston Pilot (1838-1857) — 17 January 1846

DOINGS IN BRITISH AMERICA. We formerly remarked that the Quebec Freeman's Journal had been indulging in a little innocent gasconade about their determination to maintain to themselves the blessings of British provincial government even to the shedding of blood, if it should become necessary; and also, about the excessive liberty they enjoyed under the British Lion, compared with the miserable case of those poor slaves, the citizens of the Uuion. Last week, it may be remembered, we made some extracts from that paper illustrative of those liberties and privileges in praise of which they are singing so sweetly. We then remarked that the Canada papers, like certain instruments, contained much music if we knew how to bring it out. We have since been turning and twisting some of those barrel organs; and we have obtained the following sweet harmonies, which we submit for the delectation of our readers. Let the Irishmen of the American Union bite the finger of repentance with the tooth of e...

Publication Title: Boston Pilot (1838-1857)
Source: Boston College
Country/State of Publication: Massachusetts, United States
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