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Title: Mountain Laurel Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 2,606 items from Mountain Laurel, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1984

I I gg extend fo Ljou a p£<esonal inWfafi'crv. H H+o v»si+ our sV»op To t~he, of fhe_ II g liloe. Lt.4- os be a pa«cf of uour if u moon+aln m£mo£.»£s! H g Ktv\ n £x (lain | p MeADOfgK^MN 9 VfReiNIA. i § ft>.Bax:Bl6,zip2.4120 ALL CHAIN SAW DtAURS SHOULD Bi COMMITTED. For over 54years, Stihl ® products have been sold only by parts-stocking, full-service dealers. Not discount chains. Stihl dealers are professionals committed to bringing you the best saws and the best service possible. So before you buy just any saw, talk to us. And see what a difference commitment can make. Stihl 028 ) Wood Boss $00095 I— Regular $349.95 Floyd Farm Service PHONE: Floyd, U. 24M1 SEPTEMBER, 1984 MOUNTAIN LAUREL Page 9 STRETCH YOUR SHRINKING DOLLAR ' .Sb ir MJ9 US Bsirs Now more than ever, it is important to get the most value for your money. (DEALERS NAME) and Nationwide Homes can help. You can take advantage of the economies of building over 1,200 homes annually and buying material...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1984

Page 10 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1984 WAYNE BANKS Editor's Note...This is the last installment in our series of continuing articles about Mr. Wayne Banks. Now we will settle back and keep an eye on Mr. Banks because, as one can tell from his stories, no one can imagine what road he will choose next. Rest assured, however, that he will meet the future with an eye for opportunities and with a hand for his fellow man.) In 1930, Wayne Banks had his own appliance store in Hillsville, Virginia. It was in the old Earley Building. Carroll Drug Store now stands on that site, as the Earley Building burned seme years ago. As Wayne was always interested in both music and electronics, he soon came up with a way of advertising his business and enjoying it too. He got a band together called, "The Melody Rhythm Cowboys". "I had a great long Oldsmobile car, the band would all get in it with their instruments. It had loud speakers on top and the band would play music as we drove along to an engagem...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1984

THE COOLEY FAMILY REUNION Saturday, august 4th, we were priviledged to attend the Cooley Family Reunion at the Coal Creek Community Center in Carroll County, Virginia, within sight of the original Cooley Homeplace. They were just winding up a cook out in the yard out back as we arrived for "the main event", a play presented by family members for the family enjoyment. The play, directed by Jack Cooley of Hillsville, Virginia, was based on the journal kept by Elizabeth Ann Cooley McClure. She was 17 when she started the journal and kept it until her death of typhoid fever when she was 22. If you're thinking you haven't heard of any cases of typhoid lately, you're right. The journal was kept from February 20, 1842 until 1848. Elizabeth Cooley's journal is the record of a girl growing into a woman, attending to the responsibilities of everyday farm/home life, marrying and moving westward in a covered wagon, and traveling down the Mississippi River seeking a new heme in Texas, only to fi...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1984

Page 12 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1984 MAMA'S SNUFF By: Laverne Sutton (The following story was told to me by an 82 year old lady who grew up in the mountains around Galax, Virginia, now living in Greensboro, North Carolina. ) "My daddy had two families. There were seven of us youn-uns all together. The first ones were all grown and left home when Daddy married my ma. There were three of us. I was the oldest, then there was my sister, and baby brother. I don't know how my ma got everything done that she had to do. All our meals was cooked on a wood stove, or the fireplace. Ma had a big iron pot she hung on a hook in the fireplace and an iron pot with a handle like a frying pan she made bread in. It stood on three little legs and had a lid. She'd rake hot coals out on the hearth, set the pot on the coals, then rake hot coals over the lid. That was the best bread. Ma made her own yeast from potatoes and lye from ashes. She done all the sewing. I wore many a pair of flour sack bloomer...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1984

Q: The Possum looks very much like a rat. Is it a Rodent? A: The Possum or Opossum does look like a giant rat with its hairless tail and long pointed nose, but it does not belong to the Order of Rodents. To classify it, we know it is an animal of the Class Mammalia. A mammal is a warmblooded animal that feeds its young milk from the mamary glands of the females. The possum has the distinction of being one-of-a-kind. It belongs to the order of Marsupial of which there is only one species in the United States, namely the didelphis virginiana or Virginia Opossum. The south is fortunate to have an abundance of this unique creature. A marsupial is a mairmal whose young are carried inside a pouch on the abdomen, for several weeks after they are born. A well known marsupial is the Kangeroo of Australia. Opossums differ from rodents in many ways. There are more species of rodents in the world than any other order of Mamal. They range is size from a mouse weighing a fraction of an ounce to a...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1984

Page 14 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1984 Hers has been a lifetime of waiting. And on this particular morning in late July, she was waiting for the nurse's aid to tidy up her room at the Blue Ridge Nursing Home in Stuart, Virginia. But of greater importance, perhaps, she was also waiting for August 1, 19#4 when she would celebrate her 100 th birthday. Her memory would come and go, ebb and flow. And when it would go, she still talked with intelligence. Only her time frame was wrong. She hadn't waited long, however, to marry Oregon Yeatts also of Mayberry. Only 15 years and 16 days from her time of birth on August 1, 18§4. She recalled the wedding and that the Reverend Billy Shelor had tied the knot. She remembered that "Pap" (Mr. Daniel Pendleton) had given her away, "When he should have given me a good switching instead.", she corrmented, refering to being still an almost child. She recalled as well, that about 5 years before her wedding that she had attended school in the top of Mayb...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1984

FANNIE LANGHORNE SPANGLER AM INTERVIEW FROM 1935 By: Charles F. Adams (Editor's note... The following story appeared in The Martinsville Bulitin in 1935. It was sent to us by the man who wrote it, Mr. Charles F. Adams. Mr. Adams was originally from Berea, Kentucky. Both he and his wife attended college there. She was from Patrick County and they eventually moved back here. It was at that time that Mr. Adams interviewed Fannie Langhorne Spangler and wrote this story which, when submitted to The Martinsville Bulletin, resulted in an offer of employment for Mr. % Adams with that newspaper.) "And they built the city, and dwelt therein. And they called the name of the city Dan." Remember the "Waters of Meram", the Sea of Galilee", and "from Dan to Beersheba"? From these one comes naturally to the name Meadows of Dan. It brings to one a feeling of ancient times, a sense of poetry, and, withal, a wonder as to just how the place came to be called. After many fruitless visits to learn its or...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1984

Page 16 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1984 • % / PsbmJt Pressure Treated Lumber y^^mT 2x4 i.89 2.49 "Osi ■SqfimmSH ""SSL ■!: 2x6 3.40 X 46 4.89 SOQ99 >1 V >1 O 00 A Oft 7 37 Pineßork Mulch 92118 $1.59 ** ' HAH I O»TT O.ZO I I.JI | . Pine Bark Nuggets .. .92119 $1.89 • Siphone-jei action Marble Chips 92421 $2.39 for fast, thorough I 8-8-8 Fertilizer .. 92422 $2.79 Seat extra #20701,2 f /«/71//#Lf Lu/fIVUI 10-10-10 Fertilizer... 92423 $3.99 — Peat Humus 92435 $1.49 ([xj I \ Q' llj' 19' Limited Quantities U — — — — No Rain Checks 1 1 2x4 ! 1.59 2.24 2,46 1 1

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1984

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Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1984

Page 18 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 198 A FANNIE LANGHORNE SPANGLER Continued from page 15. Solly", who was noted for his prowess as a traper, built a sturdy trap and took the wolf in, but a Mr. Ingram, being also on the look out for the animal, removed him from the trap and proudly brought him in as his capture. The ensuing law suit, finally won by Mr. DeHart, was a long drawn out affair and left but little of this world's goods to the participants at its conclusion. The first school at Meadows of Dan was of the subscription type, that is it was run from the money supplied by the patrons. The first school house was called Langhorne School and was situated near the old Langhorne home between Mountain View and Vesta at what used to be the four forks of the road. The first teacher was chap Harbor. Later Miss Sue Pedigo taught. She was the daughter of Louis Pedigo. One of her brothers was county surveyer for Patrick, another in Henry held the same capacity. Mr. Pedigo's place was situat...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1984

Spring came early to the Blue Ridge mountains in Virginia. The hills, trees, and bottom land were covered in a cloak of green velvet. The dogwood, honeysuckle, and purple violets added their touch of glory to the season. To Mama, it seemed a promise of a wonderful year. She walked slowly down the path to the mailbox, carrying a letter. Arthritis had made her knees weak, so she walked with a crutch. Her hands were drawn out of shape, but she did things one would have thought impossible. Of course it took effort and determination, but the aura of happiness and good cheer she generated, was apparent to those around her. She dropped the letter in the mailbox and in that letter was the realization of a dream about to come true. The letter contained tuition fee for the spring quarter of college for Gin Dare, her last one. Gin Dare was the oldest of the four "little girls". Mama thought if she could manage to get one through college, that one could help the others. One could sense an unexp...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1984

Page 20 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1984 A SPECIAL LETTER FROM MRS. OLYER TURNER Editor's Note... Mrs. Olyer Turner wrote us a story of her "Childhood Days" which appeared in our January issue. We heard from her again this week, and this is what she had to say Hello out there to everyone on the Mountain Laurel trail. Hope everyone is feeling fine. Sometime ago, I wrote a piece about my childhood [lt was in the January, 19&4 issue of The Mountain Laurel.] I have gotten letters and phone calls from people that know me asking that I write more. Today I will take time out and begin where I left off my childhood at age 17. First, I married a drunkard that only wanted to work at odd jobs a few hours at a time, enough to buy whiskey. Other things like food, clothes, heat and a place to live didn't seem to bother him at all. His father had us a little two room shack started that was never finished, although we lived in it and two of my babies were born in it. Many mornings I got ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1984

Genealogy I would appreciate any information on Luke Stanley , my great great grandfather, born in Franklin, Henry, Bedford or Halifax County, ca. 1775. Married Jane Standley, Jan. 22, I&L3, Franklin County, Va. they lived in Franklin County, Virginia. Thank you, Anne Stanley Chatham P.O. Box 1217 Pebble Beach, Ca. 93953 I am looking for information on my great grandparents. My grandfather was Peter Willis Spangler, 1881-1942, a blacksmith who moved to Pulaski, Va. He married Flora Mae Epperly, 1882-1951. Thank you, Patricia S. Turner 1204 E. Elm St. Graham, N.C. 27253 I am hoping to find a book on the Cundiff family genealogy. I would appreciate any information about it as my grandfather was a Cundiff from Franklin OLD DIXIE COUNTRY HAM COUNTRY HAMb other"times WE ARE LOCATED MILES NORTH OF MABRY MILL AT MEADOWS OF DAN, VA. GOING NORTH, TURN LEFT 3/10 MILE AFTER MILEPOST 172 ON THE BLUE RIDGE PARKWAY, THEN LEFT ON DIRT ROAD. GOING SOUTH, TURN RIGHT 7/10 MILE AFTER MILEP...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1984

Page 22 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1984 The Mail Box Eighteen Months ago we printed o\ ir very first Mountain Laurel. We began with no prior publishing, printing or writing experience. Our assets were our love and appreciation of the Blue Ridge Mountains and mountain people. Over the last year and a half, we've niade a lot of mistakes while learning this new (to us) line of work. You, our readers, have been understanding and supportive beyond belief. The letters we have received from you over the last 18 months have meant more to us than our words could ever convey. Your words of encouragement often relieved fatigue and always renewed our hope and dedication to preserving the everyday memories of people who witnessed the dramatic transition from ox yokes to space shuttles. As we sat around 'the kitchen table that morning in March of 1983 and opened our day's mail, we found the following first letter: Mountain Memories, Fifty-three years ago in the winter of 1930, my brother Lather a...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1984

Continued from previous page. son, worked and worshipped. I'm proud to have roots in the best two states in the U.S. If you ever extend your territory, please include Pulaski County. There is so much history there, as are in surrounding counties. Mother and I have been doing research for three years now into our families. We have discovered some wonderful things and connections. One highlight for me was to finally see "The Long Way Home", the outdoor drama about Mary Draper Ingles. Enclosed find two checks for 2 subscriptions for mother and Ruth. We will enjoy reading the forthconming issues. Sincerely, Joy L. Maner Norwood, N.C. Dear Editors: I picked up your fine paper in Wytheville at the Howard Johnson's this past June. I really enjoy reading it all. My family has roots in Wytheville, Pulaski, and Hillsville areas; so we are familiar wich the area and have traveled around some of the backroads. It would have been nice to have had your paper on our initial trips! I look forward t...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1984

Page 24 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1984 THE MAN WHO KNEW HIS WAY It was the second week of January 1935 and the air was colder than the brass tips of a blue nose Tibetan ox. Ice forming along the protruding rocks of Little Ivy Creek stilled its usual gurgle to make it run silent. The rhododendron leaves were curled like green uncured cigars hanging stiffly along the banks giving litle evidence that they would ever regain their cheerful sheen. And icicles along the road banks pushed up the red clay and held it there in grim testimony to the lowest temperatures of several years. Up ahead, a man bundled against the cold walked briskly along the single vehicle trail, his long blue overcoat striking the red top woolen socks extended above his high laced leather boots. A 1933 Ford pickup pulled alongside the pedestrian, stopped and the driver invited him inside. The walker recognizing the driver quickly accepted and inside the cab - warmer but not warm at all - he wiped away a drop of wat...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1984

WANTED: 5 GOOD NEIGHBORS The Mountain Laurel is looking for five (5) neighbors. Folks who appreciate nature's wonders enough to want to preserve them. The old two story farm house which serves as our home and office is situated on 58 acres of land. We rent the place at present, but wish to buy the house and 5 acres. Trouble is the owner wants to sell the entire property. We want to remodel the garage into an office, but can't afford to make the necessary improvements and buy the whole tract. So, like I said, we' re looking for five neighbors. Our idea is to sell 5 tracts containing 5 acres each and keep 5 acres for The Mountain Laurel, then dedicate the balance of 28 acres into a nature preserve which would be owned jointly by the owners of the five tracts. There will be no hunting, no cutting of trees, no herbicides or pesticides and no reriioval of wildflowers, shrubs or trees allowed on the reserved area. On each 5 acre tract, the removal of trees will be restricted to those nece...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1984

Page 26 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1984 (Editor's Note... This story was written by E.J. Cooley, probably in the early 1930'5. Both E.J. and E.M. are deceased, but this story illustrates the life of "turn of the century" college freshmen. E.M. went on to become Carroll County's first Superintendent of Schools. Their grandfather, Benjamin Cooley, had been the first Sheriff of Carroll County. ) We were born just twelve years after the close of the Civil War in 1865 and the public school system in Virginia was in its infancy. The first school we attended was known as Possum Hollow, located almost a mile from our house. It was a one roan log school house with a wide chimney at the south end, a door with only a latch to close it in the east side, one small window on the east and west sides and a one small pane window extending most of the way across the north end of the house. Some of the seats were made of slabs without backs except the walls of the house. The men and boys would take tu...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1984

Continued from previous page. Oak Hill, in sight of the present city of Galax (which was not dreamed of then) and boarded in the elegant home of John B. Caldwell at five dollars per month, while E.M. picked Forest Oak, some two or three miles from Woodlawn. The next spring, we returned to Woodlawn Academy and there, a burning desire to go to William and Mary College was inspired by our principal, Professor E.E. Worrell, an alumnus of the second oldest college in America, William and Mary. Our biggest problem was finances. There were no outlets for our pent up energies in the way of employment except at harvest time at the price of fifty cents a day of ten hours. Brother George had saved up from his meager salary as teacher a small amount of surplus cash and he cheerfully agreed to stand by us in this worthy ambition to raise the clouds of ignorance from our minds. Aunt Julia Price and the members of our immediate family fully agreed it was a good move on our part provided we did not...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 September 1984

Page 28 MOUNTAIN LAUREL SEPTEMBER, 1984 It'll soon be fall in the John Hayes Hollow. Since I was born in the John Hayes Hollow, I never realized or even thought about how beautiful that place was - just a little valley at the foot of towering mountains on all sides with a rippling stream running along one side. There was only one was out of the hollow (if you didn't want to climb a mountain) and that was to follow the stream. There was a narrow wagon road following the stream. The first house down the road V 2 mile from ours was another log cabin. My daddy's oldest brother, his wife and daughter lived there. Another half mile farther on was Grandpa's, my daddy's father, and his youngest brother. There was the main road which went over the mountain and to town, which was ten or fifteen miles away. I had heard my elders speak of town and wondered what is town? I knew it was a place where Daddy went to get us new shoes for school in the fall if he had the money. If he didn't have money...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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