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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1989

Vol. 48, No. 6 n % ■ I 1 J k W| *** ggp I BPHfc i MM I % m*> A J ■ Jam^M I MMB| SK X \ vßf 181 , ,>"■■!■ s *■ > - !rti | *k,'^.y ~ »—■»• —«t„ ■ Yeutter, Chesterfield Extension featured Secretary of Agriculture Clayton Yeutter credits the 4-H program in his Nebraska hometown with sparking his interest in agriculture. He appeared on a national satellite broadcast by USDA May 8 with Extension Information Director Janet Foley. The program marked Extension's 75th anniversary. During the broadcast, Chesterfield County's Cooperative Extension Service was honored as one the of the most innovative services in the country. Several of its community volunteer programs were cited, including help to people in debt. (USDA photo) Rural areas get help in planning By GREG HICKS VFB Communications Director During the early 1980s, a typical Virginia farmer's income was at its lowest point since the Great Depression. Grain producers saw corn and soybean prices fall throu...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1989

2 Higher minimum wage threatens us all The business of farming brings with it a lot of risks, many of which are uncontrollable to the farmer. Things like droughts, floods, extreme hot or cold weather and public misconceptions about food safety place a strain on the producer's livelihood. Now, another risk is threatening our livelihood. It is a proposed increase in the federal minimum wage. Both the U.S. House and Senate have proposed an increase from the current $3.35 an hour to $4.55 by 1991. That's a major increase. But the minimum numbers here fail to offer a real insight into the problem. Most Virginia farmers already pay a wage much higher than the actual minimum. For example, many farmers competing for workers in places of high migrant labor use, such as the Winchester area, Southside Virginia and the Eastern Shore, are paying H-2A workers a $4.27 wage now. By law, alien workers are guaranteed more than the minimum wage. The "adverse wage" provision requires Guard against guar...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1989

June, 1989 Gypsy moth moves caravan through state By MELISSA PHILLIPS Special to VFBF News The gypsy moth is on the increase again in Virginia this year, threatening to leave in its wake an even greater number of bare-limbed trees in the state's back yards and woodlands. The insect is expected to defoliate about a half-million acres in Virginia this year, a 250-percent increase since last year, said William Ravlin, entomologist with the Virginia Cooperative Extension at Virginia Tech. In 1988, about 200,000 acres were defoliated. The first gypsy moths came down to Virginia from the Northeast around 1980, and the infestation now covers the area from Northern Virginia into the Shenandoah National Park to Charlottesville, from there east to just south of Richmond, and then southeast into Tidewater. It's only a matter of time before the pest spreads across the entire state, Ravlin said. Already, a few male moths have been spotted in Southwest and Southside Virginia, and an isolated infe...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1989

4 REAP brings economic potential closer (Continued from Page 1) Other areas of study include clean water and air and the impact of Virginia's increasing population on rural economies. Although the financial crunch of the early '80s appears to have eased, Bell warned that the 1987 Farm Census has some revealing data. While non-farm populations in rural areas remained steady over the past five years, farm numbers tumbled from 51,859 in 1982 to 44,799 in 1987. "The number of farm operators fell by 13 percent," he noted. "And land in farm acreage dropped 8 percent." Harvested land, in that same period plunged 13 percent, he said. On a brighter note, Bell alluded to the Futures Study that shows 22 percent of Virginia's Gross State Product is related to food and fiber. The GSP is the gross value of all goods and services in Virginia. "It includes primary and secondary processing. Not all are from Virginia products and they are not always produced processed in rural areas," he said. For ex...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1989

June, 1989 J.E.B. Stuart family visits Farm Bureau By KATHY B. SPRINGSTON VFBF News Editor Maj. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart died 125 years ago in a house that stood where the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation home office is today, at 200 West Grace Street in downtown Richmond. On May 11, three descendants of the Confederate general unveiled an historic marker recognizing the place where the wounded Stuart was brought from the Battle of Yellow Tavern in Henrico County, facing death as bravely as he faced war. J.E.B. Stuart 111 sat tall in his wheelchair to loosen the marker's covering, as his son, Ret. Army Col. J.E.B. Stuart IV, and grandson, John Alexander Stuart, other family members and many history enthusiasts anxiously watched. The spacious brick home where Gen. Stuart died May 12, 1864 belonged to his brother-in-law, Charles Brewer, a doctor. It sat between the Farm Bureau's present parking entrance and front door and was demolished in 1893. Farm Bureau has had offices on the site since ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1989

6 American Farm Bureau opposes Alar ban By NORM HYDE VFBF Staff Writer RlCHMOND—Virginia Sen. John Warner introduced a bill in Congress May 17 to immediately ban Alar, an organic growth regulator used on apples, and sometimes on peanuts (as Kylar), because of alleged links between the substance and cancer. American farmers need swift action to prevent more economic losses, Warner said. He said he feels sure shoppers would buy poorer quality apples in exchange for more peace of mind. "I feel the American consumer will be glad to accept an apple which is not as pretty, and may not be stored for such an extensive period of time," he said. The Environmental Protection Agency announced May 13 official plans to cancel the registration for Alar, also known as daminozide. Alar is used to produce a better-looking apple for consumers and increase its storage life. Warner said his bill would accomplish in one day what could take the Environmental Protection Agency 18 months to do: restore cons...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1989

June, 1989 /' *'< " I>l T r j flBL| Potti and Marty Goettler have had success with Ivan and other horses by giving them a variety of experiences. (Photos by Kathy B. Springston) Horses prepared for anything By KATHY B. SPRINGSTON VFBF News Editor WOODFORD—Patti and Marty Goettler of Dark Star Farm in Caroline County are communication specialists when it comes to horses. These Farm Bureau members devote a lot of time and care to seeing that each horse they train or show listens to what the two-legged creature on its back tells it to do at the moment. That way, when an unexpected obstacle is met on the competition trail or even on a leisurely Sunday ride, the rider who communicates properly with his horse can safely and smoothly get through, over, under or around the challenge. "People think when you ride a good horse you do well, but the rider actually takes the horse to the rider's level," said Goettler (pronounced Get-ler). "What you demand of the horse is wha...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1989

8 Policy Development This is your opportunity to develop Farm Bureau policies affecting agriculture. This member questionnaire appears as an insert in the June issue of the Virginia Farm Bureau News. It should help you assess the issues important to Farm Bureau members in your county. It is designed to be returned to your county resolutions committee. Please complete the questionnaire and return it to your county office as soon as possible. Purpose The purpose of Farm Bureau's policy development Farm Bureau is your voice! Farm Bureau policy is your policy! The policy development process begins July in counties across the Old Dominion. To help your county Farm Bureau develop policies on issues that affect you, take a few minutes to look over these issues of importance to agriculture. The following questions pertain to such vital topics as agricultural research, biotechnology, import quotas, land use, zoning, and many others that affect farmers in indirect ways. Your needs and opinion...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1989

June, 1989 En forming VFBF policies co, Flue-Cured Tobacco, Forestry, Dairy, Livestock, Peanut, Soybean and Feed Grains, Labor, Education, Rural Health, Natural Resources, Women's and Young Farmers. County Farm Bureau Local Action County Resolutions Committees encourage the opinion of individual producer members and other county Farm Bureau committees on local, state and national issues. These Committees draft proposed resolutions on major concerns of the producer member. County Farm Bureaus then establish annual meeting dates for producer members to discuss and vote on proposed resolutions and to initiate resolu- m ilep. Lewis F. Payne. 6. Would you support the automatic appropriation of funds by the government to buy private lands without the approval of the landowner? Yes No Miscellaneous 1. Would you support voter registration: a. On the same day elections are held? Yes No b. Thru the DMV office as drivers' licenses are granted or renewed? Yes No Spending & Taxes 1. ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1989

10 Next farm bill under way WASHINGTON—U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Clayton Yeutter warned of increased budget cuts April 19 during the first Senate Agriculture Committee hearing on the 1990 Farm Bill. President Bush's 1990 budget calls for $1.9 billion less in farm spending, although analysts say only about $600 million will be in real spending cuts. Debate is already heating up on how to make those cuts. Yeutter said April 24 he felt the concept of "triple basing" would be more politically acceptable than cutting farm subsidy programs. Under triple basing, farmers in government programs would have three categories of land in production: 1. acres on which program crops like corn are raised and subsidies are paid; 2. acres on which program crops were raised in the past, but are no longer eligible for payments; and 3. idle land, or acres in a program through which farmers are paid not to use. In return, farmers would be allowed to plant non-program crops like oats to sell on the ope...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1989

June, 1989 JUNE DAIRY MONTH Milk is Virginia's number two commodity. The Virginia Agricultural Statistics Service's 1988 records show that about $263 million in cash receipts was generated in the state by an average of 143,000 dairy cows. Top dairy counties to date are: Rockingham with 23,700 cows, Augusta with 11,300, Franklin with 11,000, Fauquier with 6,500 and Washington with 6,000. Virginia 4-H leaders study teen problems MANASSAS—Six Virginia 4-H members studied problems of drug and alcohol abuse, illiteracy, depression, teen pregnancy, school dropouts and unemployment among American youth during the National 4-H Conference April 9-15. "We concluded the kid next door could be involved in just about anything," said J.R. McMillan, a Manassas 4-H student and member of the 4-H Ambassadors group. 'The key to solving these problems is education and prevention, along with concurrent programs to treat those people already involved in drugs," he said. McMillan said the conference recom...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1989

12 r a I - I «■» fIV W *H| I 0 JbS fIE I « if *1 u J 818 iH HA ill— —^^ Enjoyable conference, picnics, more planned Our State Young Farmer Committee, at a recent meeting in Lynchburg, made several plans for upcoming events. Mark your calendars for Jan. 27-28 and make plans to attend the 1990 Statewide Young Farmers Conference at the Roanoke Marriott. We are planning some special activities to make your time at this conference educational and enjoyable. You might pull out your Polaroid now and get ready to take some snapshopts that you feel represent the theme, "Young Farmers Live." We thought a photo contest with this theme would be a fun way to show that Young Farmers are alive and doing things in Virginia. Your district chairman will be in touch with you later to share details on this contest. State chairmen urged to talk issues, facts Laura Stanley, vice chairman of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Women's Committee, and I recently attended a meeting of all state Women's chair...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1989

June, 1989 Wet spring has stalled growth BLACKSBURG—The wettest spring in half a century is stalling the growth of popular local fruits and vegetables and have some Virginia farmers postponing or canceling crop plantings. More than 20 inches of rain has fallen this year in Tidewater, according to Virginia Tech's Agricultural Experiment Station in Suffolk. Rainfall in March and April was at its highest level since 1933. That rain, coupled with below-average temperatures, may hinder growth of strawberries, asparagus and other Virginia-grown produce. "In the raw weather we've had the first part of May, bees can't pollinate, so we can't get the fruit set," said Charlie O'Dell, vegetable production specialist with the Virginia Cooperative Extension. 'The young strawberries that are out may be weighed down by the rain and hit the ground," he said. Asparagus is "just not coming along" because it isn't getting the sun it needs, O'Dell said. Coldness and wetness also will delay just about an...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1989

14 What's cooking? Note: At the request of several of our readers, the Farm Bureau News presents this cooking corner. Each month, we'll share seasonal recipes and tips from the Farm Bureau Women's " What's Cooking in Farm Bureau Kitchens" cookbook. The recipes are truly from Virginia, both old and new. Take note of the cooks who submitted the recipes. They're your neighbors across the state. June is Dairy Month in the Southeast. It's also time for a cool, refreshing drink that won't keep you from getting into that new bathing suit. And for the June wedding, here's a pretty punch that's sure to please. Both treats use dairy products. Diet Milk Shake 1 cup skim milk 1/3 cup dry powdered milk 1 t. brandy extract 2 drops yellow food coloring or vanilla 11/2 cups ice cubes Dash of salt Nutmeg to taste 3 pkgs. Sweet and Low Put all ingredients in a blender and blend well. Serve immediately. Mrs. F. E. Smith Rockingham Strawberry Punch, simple and easy 2 p-kgs. strawberry Kool-Aid 3 qts. w...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1989

June, 1989 Bulls, Registered Angus -12 - will rent or sale. Box 115, Goochland, Va. 804-784-5145. Registered Angus Bull, A.I. Sired, Performance Tested, 950 pounds. $850. Grayson County 703-773-2262. For Sale Registered Limousin Bulls. Red or Black. $600 up. Phone 606-573-1817. Registered Polled Hereford Bulls. Ernest W. Morris, Kents Store, Va. 23084. Angus Bulls, 500 lbs., $450. Call 804-899-6171 evenings. Registered Polled Herefords - Shoestring Farm, Rt 1 Box 191, Damascus. 703-475-5266. For Sale: Registered Texas Longhorn Bull. 9 months old. Red and white. Pure Butler Longhorn. 703-579-7652. Registered Polled Shorthorn Service Age bulls. Also a few bred heifers. 703-825-0590. Registered Angus Bulls, Pine Drive Big Sky Bloodline, $800. Amelia, Va. 804-561-2490. Registered Angus Bulls. 17 Angus Bulls; aged from 11 months to 2+ years. Priced from $700 to $1,750; Sired by Pine Drive Big Sky, Old Dominion, Broadway, Tehama Bando 155, W.H. Big Sky SO4B, W.H. Geronimo ROO3, and White ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 June 1989

If your insurance program hasn't been reviewed in the past two years you probably don't have the coverage you think you have. n| |H: WB Hi MEW? * IF v 118 i % v v V* . " / / r . . . • , t - : : " m hi" ' i 8 am I^miii * §11 j> 1 g, < » »*' ■«* ■ ji§»JMHfeLv * ■• *t *f ] **$ r# 11 I STX'm ■ 5 «{■ —. * SpEr* *• **•• -i • I I «< ui Tnli *••> . : g Vol. 48, No. 6 THE VOICE OF VIRGINIA'S AGRICULTURAL .JWie, 1989 It Can Keep You From Wasting Money Your insurance advisor may discover that you 're paying for coverage you no longer need. Or if you do need additional insurance he can show you how consolidating your insurance might save you money. But at the very least he can keep you from suffering a financial loss because you're under-insured. Call your insurance Advisor today and ask for the annual check-up. It's another Blue-Ribbon service from the down-to-earth people at Virginia Farm Bureau Mutual. You're entitled to a free check-up Every year ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1989

Farm Bureau Vol. 48, No. 7 Commitment to boy calls on everyone Note: This month, the Farm Bureau News begins a two-part series on efforts to clean up the Chesapeake Bay and protect other waters. This segment is an update of the goals, progress and new steps being taken, particularly in agricultural nutrient management in Virginia. Next month's segment will focus on regulations set by the Chesapeake Bay Local Assistance Board for bay areas. By KATHY B. SPRINCSTON VFBF News Editor By the year 2000, Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania and the District of Columbia have the awesome job of reducing by 40 percent the life-stifling nutrients entering the Chesapeake Bay. The four jurisdictions committed themselves to this task in the 1987 Chesapeake Bay Agreement and, in 1988, set long-range strategies. The goal calls for cooperation from farms, factories, cities, suburbs, government — everyone. "Probably, so far, with all efforts, we've reached about 10 percent reduction — the easy fourth,"say...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1989

2 Farm Bureau was built on unique services Critics sometimes falsely charge that Farm Bureau is nothing but a big insurance company. In a recent editorial in his state Farm Bureau publication, Andrew Whisenhunt, president of Arkansas Farm Bureau, confronted that allegation, labeled it false and explained his pride in offering members a valuable, necessary service. Whisenhunt, citing devastating ice storms that have hit Arkansas in each of the last two winters, said,' Those storms made me think just how lucky we all are to belong to an organization like Farm Bureau." He said storms that struck the southern portion of the state a year ago last January damaged farm buildings, particularly poultry houses, with losses totaling more than $10 million. Then, just a few months ago, winter's icy fist struck again, this time in Northwest Arkansas. Through March 20, those claims amounted to more than $11 million. Whisenhunt praised the Farm Bureau Insurance Co. for its fast action in handling t...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1989

July, 1989 Ag in Classroom is 'essential' these days (Continued from Page 1) "I saw a situation [in Vietnam] where people never really got enough to eat. They always had a gnawing hunger," he remembers. He said the American soldiers were afraid to eat or drink from the local water and food supply because they feared disease. When he returned to the U.S. and saw the abundance of healthy food on grocery shelves he was struck by the contrast. "I guess for the first time I realized how fortunate we are in this country." Game Department now leases dove fields RlCHMOND—Virginia farmers will have a chance to make some extra money off their crop stubble this fall under a new program of the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. The department will lease dove hunting fields from Virginia farmers in counties surrounding the metropolitan area of Richmond, Norfolk, Northern Virginia, Staunton/Charlottesville, Roanoke and Bristol. The department will seek bids from farmers to enroll c...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 July 1989

4 Tobacco: rich history and strong future By GARY OAKES Midwest Young Farmers From John Rolfe's first experimental crop in the Jamestown Colony in 1612 until the present, the history of Virginia and the history of tobacco have been intertwined. No other resource has had a greater effect on the growth of any colony, state or nation. Money generated through the tobacco industry has been responsible for the building of hospitals, churches, schools, and universities (such as Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, and the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg). The cities of Richmond, Petersburg, Danville and Fredericksburg developed around tobacco warehouses, and tobacco trade was responsible for turning Norfolk, Alexandria and Dumfries into major import/export centers. Today, the tobacco industry continues to have a profound effect on the economy of the United States, as well as on the economy of Virginia. Tobacco is the sixth largest cash crop in the U.S. In 1987, the U.S. D...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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