ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Pacific Rural Press Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
252,578 results
HOW TO MAKE A LAWN. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 February 1871

HOW TO MAKE A LAWN. The ground should be entirely free from •tagna&t water. It must be trench plowed to the the depth of eighteen or twenty-four inches. A week of hot, dry weather will be sufficient to dry up the grass on a thin soil, a whole month' of drought would fail to destroy the verdure. The depth, whatever it may be, should be uniform, for if it be deeper in some places than in others, the deep places will settle and make the ground uneven. Unevenness of surface is of great importance. Ido not mean level, for an undulating surface is quite as desirable tor a lawn as a level one, but whether level or undulating it must be free from even the smallest stones, as these interfere with the operations of the mowing machine. Bed-top is the best grass for a lawn, about fifty or sixty pounds will be sufficient if the seed be clean and and good, which it seldom is. Some people recommend white clover, say one-fourth, to be mixed with red-top, and this does very well, but 1 p...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
TREE CULTURE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 February 1871

TREE CULTURE.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
A NEW METHOD OF PLANTING TREES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 February 1871

A NEW METHOD OF PLANTING TREES. The accompanying illustration rejn'esonts a tree 1, as set for standards, on a new principle, as adopted by myself. This method applies to those soils and localities which by long continued heat and drouth of summer become parched, hot and dry, as most of the valleys, prairies and agricultural lands of this state do; and are hence not as well adapted to the growing of trees, shrubs and vines, under the old established and common practice of transplanting. The advantages to be gained by following out this method, are at least four fold. [Written for tho PBEM.] Moisture is retained in and around the tree, three or four times as long, under the same amount of irrigation. The land does not dry up on the surface, and downwards, and thus prevents water from entering and settling immediately around the roots; six times the quantity of water maybe taken Up in the same space of time, and settle directly around the roots. The heat of the earth outside the linin...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE SAN JOSE BEET SUGAR ENTERPRISE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 February 1871

THE SAN JOSE BEET SUGAR ENTERPRISE. Editors Press: —As much interest is felt among the people as to what has been and is being done in the Beet Sugar business, in San Jose. I will give such information as I have obtained from a short interview with the Secretary, Mr. Tyler Beach. The capital stock is divided into 2,000 shares of $100.00 each, and amounts to 8200,000. $40,000 of the stock has already been subscribed, and outside parties stand ready to take the remaining full amount; but it is the expressed desire of the company to obtain the balance of controlling interest among home subscribers. The company feels tlie fullest confidence in succeeding in the business, and is in earnest in every resj)ect. They have not yet purchased the necessary lands, nor decided where they will establish the factory; but is figuring for something favorable. To rush up a mill at once they regard as poor policy. Able, active, yet cautious men have the management now, and they will bring matters to a ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
ORNAMENTAL AGRICULTURAL GROUNDS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 February 1871

ORNAMENTAL AGRICULTURAL GROUNDS. Editors Press: —I am informed by Mr. Tyler Beach that the Santa Clara County Agricultural Society are improving their tine Fair Grounds by setting out some lines of shade and ornamental trees through the park. The grounds belonging to the society lay on the south side of the famous Alameda, about half way between San Jose and Santa Clara. The Alameda, by the way, is one of the finest drives in the state, and is lined on each side with grand old willows, near a hundred years old, that were planted by the old mission fathers. These, in some places, meet over head and form a complete shade to the street, which sweeps on in a great curve through the midst of villas and fields and gardens. The agricultural grounds consist of 7G acres of level land, inclosed with a high, tight board fence. The race track, cattle sheds, exhibition grounds, etc., are here conveniently arranged. And now the place is to be beautified with sheltering evergreens and shady forest...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
CALIFORNIA AGRICULRURE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 February 1871

CALIFORNIA AGRICULRURE.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE FOR 1870. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 February 1871

REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE FOR 1870. [Concluded from page 57.] Sheep Husbandry. This is another industry well adapted to our climate, and one that has proved very successful and profitable here. The seasons are so mild and favorable that the increase is very rapid, and the ranges have been generally so good heretofore that flocks have not required any additional food. The wool has, as a general thing, considerably more than paid all expenses of keeping, herding and shearing the flocks, while the increase of sheep, with good care, has averaged at least 75 per cent, per annum. Those who ten years ago started in the business with a few hundred head of sheep and have remained in it, can now count their flocks by the thousands and tens of thousands. Of late years, however, a considerable difficulty has been experienced by the owners of large flocks to secure sufficient pasture for them. The ranges have been curtailed by the appropriation of the public lands for other agricu...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Mount Rainier Firing Up. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 February 1871

Mount Rainier Firing Up. Many of our readers will remember that, in the graphic account published by us of the ascent of Mount Rainier, by Messrs. Stevens and Van Trump, in August last, it was stated that they slept near the summit on a sheltered spot which was warmed by the tires of a nearly extinct crater, and they saw steam issuing from the crevices in the rooks. However incredulous others may have been of the existence of smouldering fires in the mountain, these gentlemen saw enough to remove any doubt foom their minds. Since winter set in, with its rains on the plains and its snows on the mountains, people living within daily view of Mount Bainer have observed strange and unusual sights on its ragged sides. One day it is seen covered, apparently at great depth, with snow from the summit to the base; the next day not a vestige of snow is visible. And so it is alternately white and gray from day to day; while some persons allege that they can plainly see smoke and steam ascend fr...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
July 4, 1876. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 February 1871

July 4, 1876. Hon. John Bigelow has written a letter with regard to taking steps for an appropriate celebration of the 100 th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence. He proposes that preparations should be commenced at once, that we may be able to give an adequate expression of our patriotism. The celebration should be national and universal, and the participation of foreign countries might be invited to some extent. As a commencement he makes several suggestions: The completion of the Washington Monument, of the Capitol buildings, and, as far as possible, of projected railway, telegraphic and other public works throughout the country; the restoration of the gold standard of values; re duction of the national indebtedness; mak* ing geological surveys in states which ye lack them; taking an extra Federal census in 1875. These may or may not be associated with the celebration. He also proposes for consideration several ways of celebrating the day: coining a complete set of gol...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
POPULAR LECTURES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 February 1871

POPULAR LECTURES.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Vaporization and Elastic Force of Steam. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 February 1871

Vaporization and Elastic Force of Steam. [Prof. John LeConte before the Mechanic Arts Colleok, Mechanics' Institute Hall, S. F. Reported expressly for the Press.] Steam Undrr Pressure. Lect. IV. Feb. 4. I have before treated, said the lecturer, of the laws of the elastic force of vapor below the boiling point, and of boiling under the ordinary pressure of the atmosphere. I have now to speak of the laws under pressure greater than that of the atmosphere. When a liquid is converted into vapor, its volume is very greatly increased. For instance, one cubic foot of water has a volume of 1,698 cubic feet when converted into steam. This occurs under the ordinary pressure of the atmosphere; and, with this condition, steam (not in contact with water), or any vapor, if subjected to further increase of heat, takes a corresponding increase of volume. If, however, we heat the vapor in the presence of the liquid, which we can do by heating it in a closed vessel, the elastic force increases more r...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The "Novelty" Lantern. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 February 1871

The "Novelty" Lantern. The accompanying illustration shows sufficiently well the constiuction of a claimant for popular favor. It is so simple that a detailed description is not necessary. But the shape of the chimney may be remarked on. Instead of a round or pearshaped globe, an ordinary straight lampchimney is used, -which can be procured at any country store for about fifteen ceiits. This is one of the great advantages of this contrivance which -will be easily appreciated ; for while the breakage of the glass renders the common lantern useless, this is not the case with the "novelty." The chimney is secured against all ordinary accidents, and can easily be replaced should it happen to get broken. The lantern is said to give an excellent light, not to smoke the chimney, and to be particularly good in respect to not getting out of order. It answers the purpose of a house lamp or an out-door lantern, not being affected by wind or motion. A patent has been granted for it to Mr. A. Wi...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
OUR WEEKLY CROP. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 February 1871

OUR WEEKLY CROP. Our new short-horn cattle arc getting along finely, and ' Dairymaid " has taken upon herself to stand at the entrance of our farm to greet our visitors, while she apparently turns away in displeasure from the sheep engaged in a Novel Fanning operation. We leave her to her meditations, sweetened in hope by the Crop Prospects, and look over our library of Mechanical and Scientific Progress in order to keep up with the times. We read notes of Travel in Stanislaus County, take a glance at Chicago, and. perchance, try a hand at tiling Saws. Then we listen to Dr. Thomas who dwells, in an interesting manner, on Ancient Agriculture, glance through the powerful telescope of the PftMS, at Farming operations in San Diego, and calculate the enormous possible Product of a single Weed. Walking across the Lawn, we visit the grove and see a new method of Tree Culture, with an example of Ornamenting Agricultural Grounds. We take a little taste of Beet Sugar, to sweetour path of life...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
HARD TIMES AND HIGH PRICES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 February 1871

HARD TIMES AND HIGH PRICES. If there be anything especially notable, at this time it is dearth of occupation. We have in San Francisco alone, ten thousand persona struggling against the force of a downward pressure, which may have long continuance. Small shopkeepers, innumerable, find business departing and high rents eating them up. Lodging houses numbered by thousands are half empty. A large army of speculators is sorely oppressed with homestead lots, falsely, so called, that show no prospect of having any value in our time. It is time that such people be-think them selves about the future. Large numbers of people now in tliis city, would probably leave it, if they could be brought to see that their available money "will be all spent in holding on for the expected revival. For four years past we have done little but pun" up the bladder and admire its apparent increase of dimensions. We have been preparing for a rush of strangers eager to buy at any price. Our largel land owners ha...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
FARMERS GARDENS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 February 1871

FARMERS GARDENS. Having: prepared the soil, as indicated in our last article on this subject, mid properly enclosed the spot selected for the garden, the next step is selecting: good seed. We presume that most farmers will, "when they have fairly initiated the garden system in this state, raise and save garden seeds for their own use. It will pay them to do so; provided they understand the true principles of reproduction, and exercise the necessary care and patience to practice upon them. In the animal kingdom it is a well established rule, and one that is generally understood, especially by stock growers and farmers, that "like begets like." This rule holds equally good and is equally important in the vegetable kingdom. In selecting the vegetables from which seed is to be saved for replanting, care should always be had to choose only the very best samples. For instance if you propose to save beet seed, you should select the best shaped and best grown beet, one possessing all the ch...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
SUMMER FALLOWING. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 February 1871

SUMMER FALLOWING. All the grain to be sown this season will now soon be in the ground; and if the same system of grain farming that has heretofore prevailed in the State, is to be continued in the future, then the hurry of the plowman will be at an end for the season, and a time of leisui'e for man and beast is close at hand. If, on the contrary, we are to adopt a better, more certain and more profitable system of grain farming in the future, than we have been pi'acticing in the past, then there is an important work in the way of plowing for our farmers to do yet this season. We refer to the preparation of the soil for the grain ci-op of next year by summer /allowing the land then to be sown. It is universally agreed that summer /allowing is the true system of grain farming in California. Land plowed up in the spring and allowed to remain exposed to the action of the sun and air during the summer, can be sown in the fall before any rain comes, thus giving the grain the benefit of al...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Fulton Plow. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 February 1871

The Fulton Plow. From St. Helena, in Napa County, there conies a new one-horse plow, which has a number of points deserving the attention of the farmer; for the inventor claims for it certain advantages, which, if substantiated, will make it a most useful agricultural implement. In the accompanying illustration, A is the beam, attached to the handle in the ordinary way, and E, the plowshare, connected with the beam in a peculiar manner. For the standard, B is bent, inclined or attached to the plow in such a way that its upper end will be to the right, or aAvay from the land-side. This upper end is provided with a plate, G. in which is a slot, D, through which passes the bolt securing the standard to the beam. A great variety of forms may be given to the standard, B, and the position of C may be varied according to the requirement* of the case. Moreover, the slot, D, may have any length required for the purpose of adjusting and setting the beam at any desired angle. The peculiar bend...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
DEEP VS. SHALLOW PLOWING. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 February 1871

DEEP VS. SHALLOW PLOWING. Editors Press:—Probably there is no question which at this time requires so much consideration as the subject of plowing; or one to which so little attention is paid. There seems to be a desire on the part of the farmers to cultivate large tracts of land, no matter how the work is done, so that they accomplish this particular end. Some three or four years ago, I wrote a lengthy article ujion this question, in which I stated that if one-half of the land was well plowed, and the same amount of labor put upon it, as was usually expended upon the whole, the results would be beneficial. I contend that when the Avork is well done it is twice done. No man that plows from two to three acres a day, merely turning the to]> of the ground can never succeed in farming. Let the farmer take the same team and plow six to eight inches, and he will get his return; but no, he prefers to show to the world a large area of land, that has been srinned over —the stubble...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
THE HOME CIRCLE [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 February 1871

THE HOME CIRCLE BY OUU LADY EDITORS.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
"A Soft Answer Turneth away Wrath." [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 11 February 1871

"A Soft Answer Turneth away Wrath." NELL VAN. [Written for the Pkf.ss.] What more pleasing sight than to see a little brother and sister, hand in hand, tripping along to school, chatting together in kindly tones till, lost in the crowd of school children, they separate, and each goes its way to spread peace and good will among those with whom it comes in contact? And how natural the conclusion that such little ones are brought up in au atmosphere of affection, and receive in their homes something more essential to their growth than the mere food and clothes uusually considered the only necessary care. These were my reflections as such a pair emerged from a neighbor's house, one glo- j rious morning last summer, when I was spending a fow weeks in the pretty village of N . Let us retrace their steps and see if we can discover the secret spring, from whence flows such a wealth of love and harmony. As we approach the house, the shrill voice of a woman, past the meridian of life, is hear...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
x
Loading...
x
x