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Title: Land, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 504,191 items from Land, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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MIMOSA. [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 17 February 1911

MIMOSA. Upwards of 100 farmers and land holders filled the Teinora School of Arts, to the doors on February 4th, to discuss the demands of the Rural Workers' Union. It was pointed out that no farmers begrudged a fair thing to the workers, but what got theii; backs up 011 many occasions was the sarcastic way in which the man on the land was referred to by the farm labourers. The appella tion of "cockie" was a very common one now. If a farmer was to be bound down to discontinue work at a given time, it would very often mean serious loss and inconvenience. It might come at a time when it meant all to the farmer, and was a matter of comparative indifference to the man working. The farmers must fight the question of hours to a finish, and the eight-hour principle as ap plied to the harvesting season of the year was an impossibility. It was a duty the farmers owed to themselves to work as hard themselves as pos sible at the busy time of the year, while the 48 hours could easily be ad here...

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LOCKWOOD-CRANBURY. [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 17 February 1911

LOCKWOOD-CRANBURY. Wage rates are approved as fol lows:-Threshing machine men, 9d per hour; binder and harvester driv ers, 7s per day of 0 hours, 54 hours per week; general harvest hands, 6s per day of nine hours (54 hours per week) while occupied at unskilled labour, £1 per week; ploughmen and drill drivers, 25s per week of 54 hours; drivers in all cases to look after their own horses-over and above the hours mentioned. Time of starting work to commence when the drivers leave the stable "or camp" to the time work is finished in the field. It was decided that improvers or learners be paid 25 per cent, less than the full wage, and that the full wage only apply to skilled labourers, cer tified to as such by the union, and endorsed by last employer. We oppose any interference with a farmer and his family in any way, on the ground that any outside inter ference hampers the efforts of the whole family.

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
YERONG CREEK. [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 17 February 1911

YERONG CREEK. The president of this branch writes: "At a largely attended special meet ing of this branch held here on Sat urday last, to consider the demands of the R.W.U., it was unanimously decided to enter a solid protest," re ports the secretary. "The limitation of liours and tlie rate of pay, if such became law, would be a direct blow at the foundation of the wheat-grow ing industry. It was argued that the State was experiencing a widespread wave. of prosperity, and farmers en gaged in the production of wheat and hay had had bountiful harvests for a number of years, with good prices. During this period high wages had been paid to all workers. But it was pointed out that thin years would have to be faced sooner or later, and consequently the farmers' profits would be small. In such circumstan ces, the increased expense in produc tion consequent ? upon this union's claim, (if allowed) would mean "the swallowing up of all the profits, and the probable abandonment of an in dustry ...

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
RINGWOOD. [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 17 February 1911

RINGWOOD. The secretary, Mr. N; Tait, reports that the branch was of general opi nion that it was 'impossible to fix a* rate of wages to suit the whole Com monwealth: "For instance, writes the secretary, "men would sooner work for 5s per day, in closely settled dis tricts, where there are more conveni ences than in districts less favourably situated. And again the majority of farm - labourers are unskilled. On these grounds we ask your executive to oppose any fixed pay. "If; their demands are granted by the court, then Ave submit the fol lowing scale of wages and conditions as affecting our district, which is purely wheat-growing and slieep raising. The rates suggested are: Threshing machine men, 8d per hour; chaffy, 9d. Binder and Harvester Drivers: 42s. per week of 54 hours. General Harvest Hands: 35s per week of 54 hours. Ploughmen and Drill Drivers: 25s. per week of 48 hours. While occupied at unskilled labour in slack time of year, 20s per week. Drivers in all cases to look aft...

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Personal [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 17 February 1911

^5 Personal At the meeting of tlie Executive of the Farmers and Settlers' Association, much regret was expressed at the ill ness of the President, . Mr. Robert Patten. . An attack- of' gastritis has' confined Mr. Patten to his home for the. past fortnight, but he is now recovering. This week, Mr. C. E. Rennie was appointed Under-Secretary for Lands in succession to Mr. Robert M'Donald, while, as predicted, Mr. Poate has been gazetted to the revived office of Surveyor-General. As to the latter's appointment, there seems to be gene ral acquiescence, but several Parlia mentarians are promising a hot time to the Government over the selection of Mr. Rennie, whom they regard as an "inside man," too severely "offi cial", in'his ideas of land administra tion. ' The new Under-Secretary, however, has now the opportunity of proving whether this criticism is just. Mr. A. H. E. McDonald, who has been appointed an inspector of agri culture in succession to Mr. Fry, who was well known in the Liver...

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Notes of the Week. The Inconsistent Conference. [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 17 February 1911

Notes of the Week. The Inconsistent Conference. The Labour Conference was de cidedly unificationist, as some of the .State Labour.' Party found to their cost. The majority in favour of the referenda included many who disapprove altogether of State Par liaments, and those ^wlio do not go so far nevertheless are taking a practical step towards unilication by voting for tne destruction of State rights. The contemptuous; and oc casionally violent treatment accorded at the proceedings of the Conference to Messrs. Holman, Nielsen, Kelly, and others, displayed in no equivocat ing way the hostility of the numeric ally dominant section towards the Parliamentary Labour Party of tin* State. Their political fate counts for nothing in the judgment of the iinificationists, to whom the Federal Parliament is the ideal legislative chamber. If unification is to take the place of the existing federation, State Legislatures are naturally doomed. Their place may be taken by some form of provincial counc...

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Commonwealth Burden. [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 17 February 1911

The Commonwealth Burden. Two recent items of news picturesquely and dramatically illustrate how spacious and unfrequented are large divisions of the territory over which the Commonwealth is the overlord.' In one instance we read that Captain Barclay has gone out on an exploring venture in the Northern Territory, the party being equipped with camels, while, in the second case, it is reported that- Staniforth Smith, the Administrator of Papua, has been lost in the wilds of that little known region. Captain Barclay has not much to fear, seeing that his chief peril, the chief peril indeed of .all Australian explorers of the past, want of water, is minimised by his troop of camels; The natives of the N-orth of Australia are fierce enough in some parts, but a well-armed party has less to fear from them than the solitary prospector or wandering cattleman. The position of Mr. Smith is rather more serious. Having located the coal mine discovered1 by McKay and Little on their exploration jour...

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE LAND. "Nations may battle and the world rock with revolution but the land will care for him who cares for it." Telephone 2843 City. Telegrams, "The Land," Sydney Offices 3 Spring Street, Sydney. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1911. Leasehold and the Belting of a Minister. [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 17 February 1911

THE LAND. " Nations may battle and the world rock with revolution but the land will care for him who cares for it." Telephone 2843 City. Telegrams, "The Land," Sydney Offices 3 Spring Street, Sydney. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1911. Leasehold and the Belting of a Minister. ? The proceedings of the recent Labour Conference are par ticularly interesting to country men, in so far as they reveal the true attitude of the men behind the gun in the Labour Party towards land tenures. First of all the Conference, after an acrimonious discussion provoked by the desire of some long headed country delegates to cloak the dagger, re-affirmed its undying attachment to the principle of land nationalisation as one of the goals of the party's endeavour. And then, as if to make it quite clear that this declaration of principle is some thing more than a mere mouthing of hollow words, the Con ference, at a later stage, brought the Minister for Lands, Mr. Nielsen, before it and nearly belted the political soul...

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The F.S.A. Planks. [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 17 February 1911

TheliF.S.A. Planks. cc - 1. Railway Extension, including the opening of new ports, ex tension and duplication of railways, improvement in tran sit facilities generally; the linking up of existing systems and connecting of border lines. 2. Land Settlement to be para mount over revenue: (a) Resumption of improve ment leases, scrub leases, and 18th section leases suitable for residential Settlement. (b) Resumption of large es tates .for purposes of closer settlement. (c) Provision for Work« men's Blocks. 1 3. Freehold tenure, as opposed to , nationalisation of land. 4. The choice of tenure to appli cants under Crown Lands Act. 5. Permanent right of re-appraise ment on application of all land held under residential settle ment conditions. 6. Limitation of Transfer to pre vent the accumulation of large estates. 7. Administration of the depart ment of Lands by Commis sioners. 8. Lay members of local land boards to be clected. 9. Bulk handling of grain. 10. Water conservation and irriga ti...

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 17 February 1911

An Absolute Gift! 8 miles Rail. 20 miles Tamworth, 6000 Acres 100 Acres Freehold 1137 Acres C-P. 1150 Acres C.L. Balance Improvement Lease, 13 years to run. Inexhaustible water supply, well fen ced, 7 paddocks. Champion AVOOI growing and grazing country, heavy carrying. 30/ per acre F.H., C.P., and C..L,; I.L. given in. £800 cash, bal ance for a term. Apply quickly, W. HUBAND-SMITH & CO., Stock and Station Agents, Tamworth. ? FULL PARTICULARS Send your address and we will for ward full particulars, and a few hints about fencing, and why KING-LOG DROPPERS ARE SO GOOD. First Awards Sydney and Brisbane Shows. OVER 2000 TESTIMONIALS. SOLE SELLING AGENTS: NOYES BROS, (SYDNEY) LTD. 109 PITT STREET Merchants Manufacturers Importers WE SPECIALISE IN Mantelpieces, Overmantels, Register Grates, Verandah Tiles, Kerbs and Irons, Art Gasfittings, Sanitary Ware, Gas Appliances, Electric Ware, Enamelled Baths, Gal'd Windmills, Windmill Pumps, Sheep Troughing, Plumbers' Supplies, Engineers'...

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 17 February 1911

ATTENTION is directed to the fact that "The Land" is the only Journal entitled to speak officially on behalf of the Farmers and Settlers' Association of New South Wales, It is commended by the Executive of that Association to .the sympathy and support of Members and of countrymen in general. \ . It is a Journal owned and controlled by primary producers. It belongs to the country and exists to reflect country opinion. Get into touch with it ! Send your suggestions for increasing its interest and usefulness CIRCULATION CERTIFICATE. The Managing Editor, " Tlie Land" Newspaper Co., Ltd., Sydney. Dear Sir,- , I hereby certify that I have inspected the necessary books and documents relating to the circulation of "The Land," and that at least eighteen thousand (18,000) copies of the issue of the 27<&i January, 1911, were printed and distributed. Yours faithfully, Sydney, 2nd February, 1911. ALBERT E. BARTON, F.I.A.V., A.C.P.A., Incorporated Accountant, Challis House, Syd...

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CULTIVATING WITH DYNAMITE. [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 17 February 1911

CULTIVATING WITH DYNAMITE. An American farmer lias gone in for ploughing, if it can be so termed, with dynamite. He wanted to loos en the sub-soil in clay ground thor oughly, and din't consider the plough did the work well. A subsoil plough, working a foot from the surface gave better results, but not enough to jus tify the cost of using it. As he had noticed that where stumps had been pulled out or excavations made for any purpose, and filled up, the crops grew better on the patches, he tried the dynamite.-; He found by experi ence that once the clay, even at a great depth, had been disturbed, it never packed back to its original con-, dition. A trial was made by explod ing a stick of dynamite in each of his water-melon hills, and the crop yield increased thirty-three per cent. Two . acres for cotton were then charged with 75 pounds of dynamite to the acre, the cartridges being placed in rows about four and a-half feet apart. Four rows were fired at a time, and afterwards, accordin...

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 17 February 1911

W. S. KEIK - Land Agent 56 PITT STREET, SYDNEY will attend Land Courts as follows: - NARRABRI.-20th February. .MUDGEE.-4th to 6th March. GULGONG.-7th and 8th March. SCONE.-14th March. BOGGABRI.-21st March. GTJNNEDAH.-22nd March and fol lowing days, and other courts by arrangement.

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
RESTORING HUMUS TO THE SOIL. [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 17 February 1911

RESTORING HUMUb TO THE SOIL. Humus is that important mellow surface of mould which all soils have, more or less in their virgin condi tion, and which proper tillage and rotation methods tend to conserve. Tlie minus quality of the average soils lies not so much on the chemi cal side of the soil as Upon the poor physical condition induced through the lack of any attempt to return to the soil this vital attribute which makes for productiveness, and, to gether with rational -tillage and use of manures, constitutes-the best key for unlocking the storage of latent plant" food contained in the soil. Failure*®to realise the- importance of this question, the Restoration of humus, is . responsible .. for lessening . the retentiveness of the soils for moisture, especially, in,the upper-lay ers, a serious matter in a climate of fickle rainfall;' a" lessening "of"the available plant "foodV the making of the soil colder, and the increase of the cementing action in the case of heavy soils, and inc...

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Local Government Elections. (Continued from Page 9.) [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 17 February 1911

Local Government Elections. (Continued from Page 9.) The following have also been elec- '. ted as presidents of shires and mayors of country municipalities respective ly: PRESIDENTS. ABERCROMBIE.-H. Mcintosh (al lowance £30). BAULIvHAM HILLS.-C. Cranston. COBBORA.-J. M. Whiteley. COllEEK-J. Lonsdale. GOSTWYCK.-Cr. Crapp. HASTINGS.-Jas. Gamack. HORN SB Y.-L. L. Ramsay. IiYEAMBA.-E. A. Fitzgerald. MACLEAY.-P. Knaver. MEROO.-0. D. Cox. : MITCHELL.-A. Hurst. MURRUNDI -G. B. White. ORARA.-Cr. Mulquiney: ; TALBRAGAR.-W. W. Baird. TINTENBAR.-F. II. Bartlett (al lowance £50); . . TUMBARUMBA.-Cr. McMeelcin. WANGOOLA.-L. Purcell. WUNNAMURRA-P. Corinell. MAYORS.' . CASINO.-G. J. Mortimer (allowance £52). ' ' . ' . CUDGEGOFG.-E. Hughes. CUDGEGONG.-E. Hughes. GERRING ONG.-J. B. Taylor. HAY.-J. E. McMahon. KEMPSEY.-S. L. Rudder. NARROMINE.-W. H. Hogan. NOWRA.-Aid. Willis. WALLENDBEEN.-G. F. Sackett. SHIRE COUNCILLORS. (Additional). COPMANHURST.-W. Boorman, A. H. Doust, Baillie, Baker, Bassetti an...

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PLENTY TO THINK ABOUT. [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 17 February 1911

PLENTY TO THINK ABOUT. There is 110 class of labour that needs thinking about like farm work (says a writer). It has to do with the deep forces' of Nature, as: no " other work lias. Tending >a. machine .all day in a factory, or, doing any mechanical labour is not to be com pared with the labour attendant up on growing .crops. First, there is' the preparation of that wonderful mys tery, the soil. Plenty of room; for thinldng there. Next there is : the sowing of the seed, with all the deep lessons that it implies. Then comes the harvest, and finally another great field of thinking for the dairy farmer, in the conversion of fodder into animal life. Every step in this wide range of labour calls for. an ac tive, well-stored, thinking brain. Agriculture, in every branch needs so greatly, men who think, and the men who think need the processes of education to help them think, and show them IIOAV to think. Comeback wheat is rapidly coming into favour in the South West. The average return...

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Old Time Racing. [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 17 February 1911

Old Time Racing. Some observations by an Upper Hunter correspondent upon early racing in New South Wales, suggest the reproduction of some remin iscences of the late Sir John Lackey, on the same subject. Sir John Lackey's reminiscences were put on record nearly 'twenty years ago, so that when he Speaks of "thirty years ago," we must turn our minds back fifty years. "Thirty years ago," (wrote Sir John-then Mr.-Lackey) "I had the opportunity, through my official con nection with the Parramatta races, as steward and treasurer, of having placed in my possession the official records of the races which took place in that town as far back as the year 1841. I often think of them, and bring before my mind some of those, now long passed away, who were, as racing men, the founders of the sport in Australia; and to those who maintain the beneficial influ ence upon society of a sympathy with a thorough sporting character, it will be gratifying to "know that some of the best men in; the colonies ...

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NOTES. [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 17 February 1911

NOTES. Corn, sorghum, and lucerne crops promise big returns up Canowindra way; Tiimut maize growers anticipate a record yield this year. The maize from that part has the virtue of, being weevil resistant; the effect of the bracing climate, which, hardens the shell. Potato crops in New England; on low-lying land, are rotting through the excessive moisture. There have been some good results* from rape growing in Riverina. One place was running seven sheep to the. acre for a month without making any impression on the crop. Every wheatgrower will find it pro fitable to run sheep, and in doing so ; to put in these rotation"crops. They are a profit in themselves, while im proving the land; for the next wheat crop! - ? ??? ' Pumpkin and melon crops, promise to be heavy this year. Some idea of what farming in Scot land means can be gathered from the fact that one member of the Scottish Agricultural Commission that recent ly visited us, lias been paying £40 per week rent for a farm for over ...

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE NUTRITIOUS WALNUT. [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 17 February 1911

THE NUTRITIOUS WALNUT. ' Walnuts .are easily grown in many parts of New South Wales, but chief ly on the tablelands. They are a very valuable food. History reveals the interesting fact that the ancients held the "wal nut in such high esteem that they classified it as food oniy for the gods. Mortals could, and did, exist on acorns, but walnuts were so delicious in taste and flavour, so palatable, and so nutritious, that thejr were rever ed as food only for the gods to dine upon. Modern investigation and modern customs have popularised the uses of the walnut to such an extent that it is now regarded not only as a luxury, but as a food of great nu tritive value. A chemical analysis of the nut, made by a Chicago physi cian, shows that it is six times as nutritious as meat. No A'egetable or fruit, with the possible exception of the olive, can be compared with the walnut as a strength-giving and fat producing food. All nuts are posses sed of elements of nutrition, but the highest in rank ...

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Cultivation THE ELEMENT OF LUCK. [Newspaper Article] — The Land — 17 February 1911

D(? ^ Cultivation -?» THE ELEMENT OF LUCK. Granted that the good farmer should eliminate the element of luck as much as he can from hi» work, it is there all the same. Take this wheat season, for instance. It is now evident that the heavy constant rain the last few weeks is going to mean a lot of loss to growers. Some of the crops were very late, and could not be shifted before the rain came along!1 Now, a lot of them will not be worth? 'shifting. Taken all together they might- not make much difference to the general yield in the State".' But that is lib consolation to the men that"own them. They will feel the difference. Adverse reports come along from different parts. It is bad luck, all right. As an example,, owing to storms and rain one grower up Gundagai way, has had to turn the pigs into a paddock that it was reckoned would go ten bags. That is the sort of experience on the land that has. to be set off against the glowing recommendations and ac counts of some well-meaning,, bu...

Publication Title: Land, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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