ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - ... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 382,303 items from Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
382,303 results
LOWER Goes All FRUGAL! Economies without Tears [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

LOWER Goes All FRUGAL! Economies without Tears By L. W. LOWER, Aus- tralia's foremost   humorist In these times of domestic dolor and financial misery it seems incumbent on me to issue a couple of clarion calls. What the earnest young housewife must do is ECONO- MISE. THIS may not have struck the young housewife before. Let it strike her now, while the iron is hot and the clothes are damped. A considerable amount of spendthrift-   ishness (try that on your husband next lodge night) is going on. Not only going on, but encouraged by certain scurrilous journals purporting to have the common weal at heart. It was but a little while back that I saw upon the billboards, "HOW TO KEEP A FAMILY OF SIX ON £3 A WEEK." This may be all right at Government House, but for the general public it savours too much of self-indulgence. Now, I have worked out a method of keeping a family of 12 on somewhere about 10/- a week. Food, of course, is the main item, and I have drawn up...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

Princesses, duchesses, marchionesses, patrician leaders of society . . . share one birthright of race and breeding . . . beautiful skin, flawless as gem-cut diamonds . . . To these women, to all women, as Lady Violet Astor says, "Pond's have done a wonderful service for they have put in our hands the means of looking younger and younger each year.". . . Mrs. Morgan Belmont says, "Pond's carries off I Pond's Cold Cream is the first step in the Pond's |2 A smooth, well-bred finish adds so much to one's poise. Method. Generously apply as often as needed during the |Smooth on a dainty film of Pond's Vanishing Cream before day, always after exposure. Let the fine oils penetrate |you powder-face, neck, shoulders, arms ... It gives pro- every pore and float the dirt to the surface. At bedtime |tection from sun and wind, keeping your skin smooth, and be sure to repeat this all-important cleansing to remove |makes your powder cling for hours . . . Marvelous to keep the day's accumulation of ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
What the UNIVERSITY OFFERS Careers for Women.. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

What the   UNIVERSITY OFFERS A girl student in the laboratory By OUR Special Commissioner Every year that passes sees more and more University trained women taking their place in the professional, commercial, and industrial world. Even though the opportunities for women have been reduced by the general slump in employ- ment, each year proportionately more women graduates are ab- sorbed, and proportionately more jobs offer themselves. What training does the Uni- versity offer women?   FIRST, women may enter any de- partment within the University and take any course of study given there. Women are no longer debarred by their sex from becoming doctors or engineers, as they were in many coun- tries a few years ago. By University study women may train to become: A doctor or surgeon. A dentist. A barrister or solicitor. An engineer (in any branch). An architect. A pharmacist or dispenser. An industrial chemist. A teacher in secondary schools (in a great variety o...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
As A Woman Sees DIVORCE [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

As A Woman Sees DIVORCE By MRS. L. P. LITTLEJOHN "Seventy-five per cent. of the divorces are due to bad house- keeping." This statement was made at a recent conference, and was the opinion of a magistrate in another State. It brought forth a voice of protest from all concerned. Since then a mayor, to make it more "thrilling" in quoting it, raised the percentage to 90, but I suppose an inaccuracy of 15 per cent. must not be cavilled at! But is there any truth in either statement? LET us look at the question sanely and fairly. For every effect there   must be a cause. Therefore, for every divorce there must be a cause. Since marriage must take place to make a divorce possible, we must begin at marriage, see why people get mar- ried, and then see if they get divorced because they did not get what they ex- pected. I recently conducted a competition on "What is the Main Reason Why Women Marry," An overwhelming majority of those who competed said: "Because women wanted a home...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

GILBEY SUGGES-GINS SUGGEST that on their arrival you greet your guests with a potation of GIL- BEY'S in cocktail form. They will be less likely to criti- cise your party after   their departure.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
NEW BOOKS AT A GLANCE NERVES—all about them Book reviews the Cause and Effect [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

NERVES—all about them Book reviews the Cause and Effect IT is a long while since we have come across a book that has impressed us so much as "Outwitting Our Nerves." This book by Dr. Josephine Jackson and Helen Salisbury has just been pub- lished in a second edition by Angus and Robertson. Every woman knows what it is to suffer from "nerves." The nagging head- aches, that jaded feeling, impaired di- gestion, listlessness—every patent medi- cine advertisement is full of the symp- toms, and yet probably not one woman in a thousand reading those knows any- thing basically about the malady known as "nerves." As a matter of fact, the actual nerve fibres are not affected at all. The con- dition is one of disturbance of the vari- ous functions of the mind and body. Its treatment has in recent years be- come highly specialised and highly effi- cient. The treatment is known as psycho-therapy, which is the use of the mental measures of psycho-analysis and re-education. Medical science learnt ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
CLEVER IDEAS HINTS FROM READERS [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

CLEVER IDEAS —   HINTS FROM READERS WHEN MAKING pastry, mix enough to last a week but do not wet it. The mixture will then be ready always when wanted in a hurry. It improves with keeping.—2/6 to Mrs. A. Wheeler, Joseph Street, Rydalmere. THIS WINS 10/- A BOOT-SCRAPER for wet weather can be made from the lid of a butter box and about 35 metal tops from soft drink bottles. Turn them upside down, and nail them on the lid. Put the box lid in a place where it will stand firm, and make the family scrape their feet on it.—Mrs. Lindeman, Station Street, Leura. BROKEN CHINA can often be mended and cracked china preserved, by boil- ing in milk. If broken see that pieces are quite clean, fit together, and bind tightly with thread. Boil slowly in enough milk to cover the article.—2/6 to Mrs. A. E. Jeffery, Crown Street, Parramatta. A NOVEL BATH mat can be made by folding a chaff bag in four and sewing a piece of waterproof material to it for a base. Work a design in rough wool on ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
ROMANCE AND ROYALTY [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

ROMANCE AND ROYALTY By ETTA COWAN PRINCE WILLIAM, of Prussia, has just married (against his family's wishes) the beautiful Dorothea von Sal- viati. His bride is not really a commoner for she is a descendant of the Princess Salviati, and to this day the Palazzo dei Salviati still stands in the Via dei Serragli, in Florence. So she really is of a family as old as his. The palace is no longer the abode of princes. It has been turned into apart- ments. Two little Australian girls, whose father had just taken an apartment in the old palace, were told its ghost story by the Italian servants, who, in fear and trembling, with frequent crossing of themselves, poured out this story to the enthralled little listeners. Prince Salviati saw and fell imme- diately in love with Caterina Canacci, a beautiful red-golden haired daughter of the people. But it was necessary for him to marry one of his own class—and the daughter of a noble family became his bride. But word came to the Princess that the P...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

HORACE LINDRUM Australia's Boy Wonder Billiardist, and Holder of the World's record Snooker Break, praises HEENZO the famous money-saving family remedy for COUGHS COLDS, BRONCHITIS & 'FLU COSTS 2/- — SAVES £'s For the last twenty years millions of Australians have saved much money by making their own family cough and influenza remedy with HEENZO. It is so easy to add a two-shilling bottle of concentrated HEENZO to sweetened water, and thus make a large supply of cough remedy equal in quantity and superior in quality to about £l's worth of the best of the ready- made-up remedies for chest and throat ailments. The purity of HEENZO makes it an ideal cough remedy for babies as well as adults. should be used in every home HEENZO

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

THERE WOULD be no trouble in Mrs. Henry Berger's home on wash- ing days. She is the champion women's buck saw contestant of America. Mrs. Berger sawed through an eight-inch log in 23.5 sec., break- ing all women's records for this event at the Third Annual Wood-Chop- ping and Sawing Contest, held in that country quite recently.

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
The DEATH Scream [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

The DEATH Scream AS Cory read these in- dications of emo- tional undercur- rents, young Harri- son Berkely hastily returned to say that Dr. Westfield would come at once. The investigator nodded. But Ber- kely's reappearance reminded him of someone else: and he asked Professor Lacombe: "By the way, where is your Arab?" "Haj Ibn Mayyud?" The professor looked slightly surprised by the query. "Why, he was here a few moments   ago. I—I sent him down to the museum." "The museum— —-??" "We have many valuable objects—" "With a des- perate criminal around," quickly By OSCAR SCHISGALL interrupted Dr. Kyne (too Quick- ly, thought Cory), "we decided we'd better be sure the museum was locked and untouched. After all—" He got no further. His words were suddenly, eerily, shattered by a piercing scream that leaped from somewhere far out in the fog! A crazy, gleefully exultant: "Ayeee . . ." Dan Cory caught his breath in amazement. And Professor Philip Lacombe, whirling around with his ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
COCKTAILS at Flat No. 7 Mrs. C.W. Marsden's Bright Gladswood Party [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

COCKTAILS at Flat No. 7 Mrs. C.W. Marsden's^ Bright Gladswood Party A charming study of Mrs. C. W. Marsden at the beautiful bronze gates of the lounge. MRS. U. W   MARSD E N'S guests were invited to a cocktail party at her new flat to celebrate her home- coming, so a police- man had a busy time outside No. 7 Gladswood Gar- dens, regulating the traffic. A very delightful lounge divided by bronze gates, with cushions and comfy seats in jade bur- lap of a new shade. hand-weft, was the background. A bal- cony which jutted out over the blue waters of Double Bay showed electric blue, spangled with lights, and the cocktails were in keeping with the hour. Delicious drinks Of "Pussy Foot and tomato juice were labelled non-alcoholic. Subtle and potent cocktails were carried to and fro with savories of caviare. An American frozen savory was most appealsome. Thick slices of pale green colored cucum- ber with a scoop-out which was filled with cream cheese and chopped up gherkins, th...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
SYNOPSIS OF "THE DEATH SCREAM" [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

SYNOPSIS OF "THE DEATH SCREAM" Katherine Lacombe is the niece of Professor Philip Lacombe, and is stay- ing with him. The professor is an Egyptologist and has an extensive pri- vate museum of ancient tomb relics in charge of an Arab servant, Haj Ibn Mayyud. Guests of the professor are   Dr. Kyne and Stewart Merriton, who have been helping him for a fortnight to catalogue some recently acquired re- lies. Harrison Berkely is the professor's assistant. The household is awakened late at night by an unearthly scream. Katherine, who has been terrified by these screams before   hurries from her bed to phone Dan Cory a young student, the son of Police-Sergeant Cory, who is laid up with a broken ankle.   On her way to the phone she overhears a conversation between her uncle, Dr. Kyne and Stewart Merriton. They refer to the awful cry as "The Death Scream," a Bedouin battle-cry which means death to all who   hear it. They discover her presenc...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
Prizes On Every Page [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

Prizes On Every Page There is still another £80 waiting to be won by readers of The Australian Women's Weekly who like to put them- selves on our outside "staff" and send in letters, ideas, jokes, and paragraphs to the many features in this paper for which prizes are offered. Full details of this week's prize- winners are given in their respective fea- tures, but here is a summary of how the first £20 was distributed. In all £100 will be paid: For the best letter telling what readers like best, the first prize of £5 goes to Miss L. Mackenzie, "Varni," Blair Street, North Bondi. Eighteen prizes of 5/ each have been awarded for other letters, de- tails of which will be found on Page 2. The £5 prize for the best recipe was won by Mrs. W. Thomson, 45 Fletcher Street, Campsie; and six other prizes of 5/ were awarded. See this feature for details. The best "Clever Idea" was sent in by Mrs. Lindeman, Station Street, Leura. She wins 10/, and four other readers win 2/6. Miss E. Esme Williams...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
WEDDINGS [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

Curtis-Wallington     One of the many interesting weddings solemnised during the week was   that of Miss Marjorie Wallington second daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S. E Wallington, of Hurstville. The bride- groom was Mr. S. Curtis, second son of Mr. W. Curtis and the late Mrs Curtis, of Bega. The ceremony was performed on Monday June 12, at St. Mary's Basilica   which was decorated in a graceful floral scheme for the occasion. The Rev Father Kenny officiated. The bride wore a gown of white satin classically trained and a flowing veil secured about the head with a coronet of orange blossoms Her bouquet followed the popular floral muff idea, and was composed of hyacinths and delicate fern fronds. Her sister, Mrs. J. Hunter, acted as matron of honor, wearing a frock of white angel skin, finished with squirrel fur, and a small cap of tulle. She carried a floral muff of crimson roses and fern fronds. Miss Mollie Walling- ton, another sister, w...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
MAKING GOOD CITIZENS of the FUTURE [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

MAKING GOOD CITIZENS of the FUTURE To be a centre which will provide varied training—afford suggestions for the profitable use of leisure time, and the teaching of self-control, obedience, loyalty and cleanliness—is the ideal of each of the 16 Free Kindergartens of the Kindergarten Union of New South Wales. In the congested districts where the Free Kindergartens are established, there is often a lack of opportunity for self-expression and normal development along healthy lines and it is for this pur- pose that Free Kindergartens are estab- lished and maintained by public-spirited citizens. The work done is entirely for the young children, but, because their welfare can- not be established without the co-oper- ation of all who come in contact with them, the Kindergarten director must be in touch with the fathers, mothers, elder brothers and sisters of their little charges. Behind every game played at the Kin- dergartens, every little duty performed, and every story told there is the ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
The Social Round. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

Hinkler—a solemn and unforgettable scene. Nelson Cox, an analytical chemist, is engaged in his profession with an Anglo-American firm in Flor- ence, and the couple live in Via Torna- buoni, one of the principal streets of the lovely town. * * * THE MISSES Hort-Brown will dodge the rest of the winter, as they are leav- ing for a tour of the East shortly. * * * THURZA WHITNEY, whose station home is near Woodstock, leaves for Eng- land on June 24 in the Otranto. She will be accompanied by her friend, Mrs. Raymond Laurie, who is joining her military husband in Ireland. Lady Mait- land, who has been staying with the Whitneys for a fortnight, has now re- turned to Sydney. * * * SIR WALTER and Lady Leitch (she was Bertha Maine), arrived in Mel- bourne from England last week and were entertained at a large dinner party. One of the guests was an old friend of Sir Walter—-Mr. J. J. Rouse, of Sydney, * * * WARRINGAH HALL, Neutral Bay, was uncomfortably overcrowded by the record attendance at t...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
The Siren The longshore rat had boasted that he would have the last laugh and he certainly looked like getting it. [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

The Siren   The longshore rat had boasted that he would have the last laugh and he certainly looked like getting it. —Illustrated by Syd. Miller AFTER fourteen months of soul- deadening mono- tony inadequately described in the   charter-party as "a voyage to Aus- tralia and trading P a c i fi c," the Maple Grove was safely moored alongside Ballan- tyne Pier in her home port of Vancouver. Home with over a year's pay to draw . . . It was the nearest concep- tion of Heaven that a deep-water sea- man could imagine. Previously advised by wireless, the shipping master came aboard before noon, and within a couple of hours the crew were paid off and wending their several ways into the city. They were free men after long months of sea-conflnement; their scanty wages heavy in their pockets, and each with nothing now to do but fulfil individual desire. But "paying off" after a long blue water voyage must be experienced to be appreciated. In the little cabin he shared ...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
THEATRE REPLACES CHURCH [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

THEATRE REPLACES CHURCH HERE once stood a small church at the corner of Brown and King   Streets, Newcastle, now a bright little theatre has been constructed. For the past month the premises have been a hive of industry with all mem- bers busily occupied with the paint- brush and tools converting the interior into a modernistic hall designed by Mr. L. Arthur Clack, business manager. The colors chosen for the decorations are grey, blue, black, and maroon. The movement has been fortunate in securing the support of Miss Ermyn Hookway as the producer. Miss Hook- way will be remembered by her success- ful productions at the Community Play House, Sydney, last year, which included the three-act comedy, "Augustus Does His Bit," by G. B. Shaw; "The Roman- tic Age," another three-act comedy by A. A. Milne; and a series of one-act plays, the most outstanding of which were "Phipps," "Defeat," and "The Man in the Bowler Hat."

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
POLO AT COBBITTY [Newspaper Article] — The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982) — 17 June 1933

POLO AT COBBITTY A cheery prelude to the big polo matches of next week was the opening at Cobbitty on Saturday of a week's tournament, with the Gilbulla Cup and W. H. Anderson Cup as trophies. THOUGH the afternoon was showery, some hundreds of women collected to watch the chukkers. During sunny in- tervals they congregated in groups on rugs or around picnic tables, or parked themselves on the running boards and bonnets of their cars. Everyone was warmly wrapped, and some smart spectator sports clothes graced the occasion. Suzanne Crookston, a simple little black and white check shirt topping her riding outfit, looked the picture of grace, as she fulfilled her duties as linesman for the afternoon. With her red gold hair glinting in the sunshine, she rode up and down the lines in perfect style. Among others who were in riding kit were Phyllis Skene, who, like Suzanne, is a polo enthusiast. Phyllis acted as groom for her father, Mr. Curtis Skene, and brother Bob, who was hurt during th...

Publication Title: Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: National, Australia
x
Loading...
x
x