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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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FOR EXAMPLE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

FOR EXAMPLE. "What is a conjunction?" asked the school- mistress. "That which joins together," was the prompt reply. "Give an illustration," said the schoolmis- tress. The up-to-date girl hesitated and blushed. "The marriage service," she said, at last.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HAIR BLEACHED BY NERVE SHOCK. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

HAIR BLEACHED BY NERVE SHOCK.     Nerves play us strange tricks. We read in   the "Lancet" a case in which, as the result of a   severe injury to the head, the right half of the   sufferer's brown moustache and beard became   blanched so as to be almost white. The hair of   the scalp was not affected. The change was   watched during life and carefully noted after   death. It was like that which has been described   as the result of profound emotion, but it was due   here to a physical agency. It can only be ex-   plained by assuming that the disordered nerves   so changed the secretion at the roots of the hair   as to produce a material capable of ascending the hairs and discharging their color. But after   death another thing was noticed; the very grey,   almost white right hal...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FREDDY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

FREDDY. Once there was a little boy named Freddy,     little more than seven, and very very good when   out of mischief.   He kept his aged mother, too, which is quite   rare among little kiddies; he kept her "on the   jump," as rude little boys say, and if he did not   make her living he at least made it lively for   her. Often Freddy's mother would take her little   son on her knee, and pat him so much, that he   could not help crying. Sometimes the patting   was done with a slipper, at which times Freddy   often wished his mother had not so much s0le.   One day Freddy saw a very little chap with   a pocket-knife in his hand. Being a humane boy,   our hero volunteered to take care of the knife   until the owner was big enough to use it with-   out cutting himself....

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE KAISER'S FAVORITE DRINKS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

THE KAISER'S FAVORITE DRINKS. The German Emperor has a magnificent wine cellar, containing precious brands from all parts of the globe. Each brand has its separate en- closure shut in by iron railings, with a tablet affixed giving name, age, price, and number of bottles. The head butler is an American. No flasks or decanters are ever placed on the Im- perial table, but the wine is poured out by the footmen from the original bottles. The Em- peror William's favorite liqueur is Kirschwasser, while he is also fond of American whisky.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CONTEMPT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

CONTEMPT. Bob: Come on, Bill. 'Taint no good waitin'.   There'll be no "butt" here. He'll chew what he   can't smoke.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
EXPLAINED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

EXPLAINED. Mrs. Peck (reading): "It says here that the man who wrote 'Home, Sweet Home' never had   home." Mr. Peck (moodily): "Of course not. That's what made him take such as optimistic view of the subject."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ABSENCE NO HINDRANCE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

  ABSENCE NO HINDRANCE.   The telephonograph is an improvement upon   the telephone, and is coming into use on the   Continent. When a person speaks through a   telephone fitted with the new attachment and the   person with whom he desires to communicate   is absent, the message is printed by a tape ma-   chine, and the other may read it on his re-   turn.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Complete Short Story. ON THE PROMENADE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

Complete Short Story. ON THE PROMENADE.       The "turn" of the evening was over. The jaded enthusiasm of the music-hall aud- ience had feebly revived at the body contortions of "La Manuelerro," only to sink into redoubled apathy when the programme intimated that the "Comyns Canine Can-Can" would be the next item. Esmond Iles turned his back upon the stage, and lit a fresh cigar, listlessly eyeing, mean- while, the turbid muddy stream of humanity pursuing its wearily jocund course along the promenade. He yawned, and thought contentedly of the smooth-haired wife at home, who, with the lamp- light streaming down upon her bowed head would be doing some useless graceful needle-work to while away the hours till his return. He yawned again, a more prolonged yawn, and came to the conclusion, as he gazed on the hol- low familiar scene, and the hollow familiar faces, that the monotony of vice was far more boring than the monotony of virtue. The one, he ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MRS. ROOSEVELT ON DRESS. FASHIONABLE APPEARANCE ON £60 A YEAR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

MRS. ROOSEVELT ON DRESS.   FASHIONABLE APPEARANCE ON £60   A YEAR.       Women generally, and fashionable women par-     ticularly, were aghast recently when the cable   fiend informed them that Mrs. Roosevelt spent only £60 a year on dress.   This report of a chat with the wife of the     American President may elucidate what the cable-   man left out. The report in question says:—   Mrs. Roosevelt (according to a New York   writer) has been receiving her friends informally   for the past two weeks every Friday afternoon.   All the ladies in high official rank and the per-   sonal friends of the mistress of the White House   have been bidden to pay their respects on these   occasions. Naturally the subject of dress was   intro...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MYSTERIOUSLY WEIRD. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

MYSTERIOUSLY WEIRD. The "Singing Well" of Texas is one of Nature's curiosities. It is stated that in calm weather a sound like that of an Aeolian harp comes up through the tangle of creepers which cover the walls of the well below. At times the sound seems clear and near, then it recedes, as if far away, and reaches the ear very faintly. The well is believed to be about sixty feet deep. An attempt was made some years ago by the owner of the well to fill it up, but after two men   had been shovelling earth into it for two weeks   the effort was abandoned, as the depth of the well did not seem to be reduced. The water is clear and palatable.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A FAIRY PALACE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

A FAIRY PALACE. The King of Siam is an ingenious as well as a luxurious monarch. He has lately designed a wonderful palace of glass, which floats, when not in use, in the middle of a large lake, reached only by boats. When his Majesty wants to escape from the torrid atmosphere of his native country he goes aboard his palace with his suite. Heavy weights are attached to the floor of the house, and the whole sinks to the bottom of the lake. There the King remains until he is tired of his surroundings, when the weights are removed,   and the palace floats to the top again. Air is pumped into the rooms through pipes while the palace is under water.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BATTLE OF LANGUAGES. VICTORY PRACTICALLY WON FOR ENGLISH IN MALTA. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

BATTLE OF LANGUAGES. VICTORY PRACTICALLY WON FOR ENGLISH IN MALTA. Reliable advices from Malta are very en- couraging as to the state of affairs in the island. The taxes are being collected without difficulty, and the Italian agitators have split among them- selves. Taxation is an accomplished and recognised   fact, and as the language question was only brought into prominence by pushing to the front the alleged prospective financial burdens—which are proving to be utterly exaggerated—the bulk of the people have ceased to feel keenly on the matter. The primary schools are working the new sys- tem of free choice with great success, and, in spite of all influences—ecclesiastical and poli tical—the preponderating majority of parents elect for the English language, instead of the Italian, to be taught their children. The battle of the languages is practically won, and His Majesty's Government are to be warmly congratulated on their firmness in introducing and resolutely bac...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TEA AND VACCINATION. NEW FORM OF FASHIONABLE "ENTERTAINMENT." [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

TEA AND VACCINATION. NEW FORM OF FASHIONABLE   "ENTERTAINMENT."   "Tea and conversation" used to be the for-   mula for afternoon "at homes." The satirical   suggestion that "tea and vaccination" should be   substituted appears to have been taken in   earnest by hostesses who wish to be "in the   movement["] (says a London daily).   "Lady Blank—To meet Dr. Blank. Inoculation   at five," is the form which is now being used by certain West End ladies in search of a new dis-   traction. The ladies meet at four o'clock for tea, and to discuss the question of vaccination. At five they submit themselves to the ministrations of the doctor. Some days later the party re- assembles to meet the doctor again and com- pare notes. Meanwhile, the public authorities responsible for the health of London in the early weeks of November were optimistic about the present &...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
KNOCKED OUT IN ONE ROUND. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

KNOCKED OUT IN ONE ROUND.   At the Zoo in Central Park, New York, there   was a fierce and bloody fight the other day. The outcome, it is feared, may prove fatal to the male eagle, who provoked the battle. No one knows just how it started, but it may have been a scurrilous remark about the personal appear- ance of his mighty mate that drew down her wrath upon the luckless male—anyway, they fought. Loud screams and angry thrashings in the cage first drew the keeper's attention, when he discovered a frightful mix-up. The great curved beaks tore, the fearful talons struck and cut, the powerful wings beat and pommeled as the pair rolled in conflict on the floor. There was a brown nimbus of down and feathers in the air about them.   The female is a much larger and more power- ful bird, and at last succeeded in vanquishing her partner. He, poor, battered, featherless wretch, presented a pitiable sight when rescued by his keeper; though his eyes still...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Driven Mad. BY DIVORCE PROCEEDINGS. FALSE ACCUSATIONS. UNBALANCE A WOMAN'S MIND. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

Driven Mad.           BY DIVORCE PROCEEDINGS. FALSE ACCUSATIONS. UNBALANCE A WOMAN'S MIND. "This woman is falsely accused, and this     trouble has unbalanced her mind," said Lawyer   Abraham Levy to Justice Clarke in the Supreme   Court of the United States a short time ago,   when he announced that Mrs. Anna Theresa   Lang Behlen, a pretty harpist, whose husband is suing for an absolute divorce, had become a   raving maniac from worry over the accusations   against her. Mr. Levy asked for a postponement   of the hearing.   He produced an affidavit made by Mrs. Beh-   len's mother, Mrs. Margaret Lang, of Wheeling,   W, Va., who swore that her daughter had gone   insane, and is now confined in an asylum at Columbus. O., and that the physicians agree it ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
RUSSIAN AND TELEPHONE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

RUSSIAN AND TELEPHONE.   An American humorist says that a druggist in the heart of the Russian colony in Chicago the other day had a telephone instrument installed in his place for the accommodation of his patrons. The minute the first user of the 'phone began to   talk Russian into the receiver, the wire kinked into small knots, like a tensely-twisted string. They couldn't do a thing to meet the emergency until one of the telephone linemen, who had once attempted to do missionary work in a Russian settlement in Minnesota, replaced the smooth in- sulated copper strand with the ordinary barbed     wire." This proved a perfect means of trans- mission for Russian speech.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
North Sidney Water Famine. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

North Sydney Water Famine. PRESIDENT GARRARD LOOKING FOR A CHANGE.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHAT AN EMPEROR READS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

WHAT AN EMPEROR READS. The German Emperor is an omnivorous reader of the newspapers, and is particularly careful to acquaint himself with everything that is written about himself in the press. Articles and para- graphs commenting upon his Majesty are cut out and preserved in a scrap-book kept for the pur- pose.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE NEWEST FAD OF THE AMERICAN GIRL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

THE NEWEST FAD OF THE AMERICAN GIRL.   Lace-making is the newest fad of the American   girl. To follow it requires more skill and pa-   tience than most fads demand, but the American girl is not discouraged, and the lace she has so   far produced is distinctly worth while.   With dexterous fingers she unites the threads,   and forms exquisite copies of the old patterns of   Chantilly, Valenciennes, and point de Venise, for   collars, cuffs, and boleros, and several ambi-   tious young women have spent much of their   time for the last two years in weaving long lace   curtains. Many young girls in New York gain   a livelihood by making lace and selling it to   shopkeepers, for this is a lace season, and even   with the thrift of the busy young women added   to the quantities of imported and m...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOW TO WASH THE FACE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 4 January 1902

HOW TO WASH THE FACE. Everybody washes their face, but very few   people do it properly—that is, thoroughly. First   you require warm water, or tepid, at any rate.   Cold water, or even cold soft water, never   cleanses. Warm rain water is a treat. Then you   require a mop of some kind, not a sponge. The   sponge is useful simply for laving the face and   body, and should never be soaped. Some people   prefer a bath glove, others a loofah for this pur-   pose. I pin my faith to a piece of flannel, old   and soft. Well seeped, well rubbed on, it acts as   a magic cleanser. You can watch the crop of   blackheads springing black and thick and flourish- ing luxuriantly in the favorable soil in the faces   of elderly and old people who are not very par-   ticular about their toilette. Blackheads are di- &...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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